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  #42001  
Old Posted May 21, 2017, 11:27 PM
Tourmaline Tourmaline is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Martin Pal View Post

A couple things for argument's sake, what is making the marks in the road that cars have traveled over. There's definitely some reason for the dark areas where the tires have driven over and the light areas that weren't.

Also, look at where the P.E. tracks are below the car that's at center left. Doesn't that look like something, whatever it is, is pushed out into the road?
I'm inclined to agree with the others regarding the exposure of the image creating the snow effect. For all we know, it might have been one of the hottest days of the year.

If I am not mistaken, the streets in the photo were light-colored concrete rather darker asphalt laden macadam. The light colored streets would have thrown off most light meters, assuming one was even used. The dark areas appear to be contrasting dirt, rubber and oil tracking, which was pretty common for traffic patterns of that period and cars that dripped as much as they drank. If it were snow, or even freaky cold weather, background vegetation does not seem impacted, e.g., plenty of leaves.
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  #42002  
Old Posted May 22, 2017, 2:00 AM
Martin Pal Martin Pal is offline
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HossC indicates he traced the photo to:


Quote:
Originally Posted by HossC View Post
I traced the photo to Mary Austin & Scott on Flickr. It's dated 1943, and there's no mention of snow in the description. While I can see that the lighter areas look like they could be snow, the lack of any visible snow in the park or on the roofs (as mentioned by Earl) makes me doubt that theory.
I'm dubious of dates on things, but there was snowfall in 1944...so that might be one thing. Regarding visible snow in the park, I was looking up snow photos posted on NLA today and there are some photos where the road/roadside is snowy, but the hillsides are not.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Earl Boebert View Post
Can anybody figure out where the photographer was standing?
Cheers,
Earl
I'm 99% sure the photo was taken from a window or the roof of the Marquis Movie Theatre building, AMPAS took it over in 1946. This is the outside:

Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
Academy Award Theater, 9038 Melrose Avenue, circa 1951

ebay
__
It's on the bottom right of Dennis Hoppper's Double Standard photo.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Tourmaline View Post
I'm inclined to agree with the others regarding the exposure of the image creating the snow effect. For all we know, it might have been one of the hottest days of the year.
When I first looked at the photo that's what it reminded me of. A very hot day. But, then, I always ask, too, what would be the purpose of taking that photo, otherwise?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tourmaline View Post
If I am not mistaken, the streets in the photo were light-colored concrete rather darker asphalt laden macadam. The light colored streets would have thrown off most light meters, assuming one was even used. The dark areas appear to be contrasting dirt, rubber and oil tracking, which was pretty common for traffic patterns of that period and cars that dripped as much as they drank.
Here's a photo of the Cahuenga Pass, February 16, 1943, with similar road markings and white areas that would look more pronounced if over-exposed.

USC Digital Libraries

Unless we had weather reports each day from the L.A. Times or Herald, I don't want to erase the possibility!
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  #42003  
Old Posted May 22, 2017, 2:14 AM
Martin Pal Martin Pal is offline
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Well, since I've been searching NLA for snow posts and googling photos and past weather information and such,
here's a few more snow related photos from Los Angeles and environs that I didn't see posted when I
searched the forum.

It's HOT in L.A. today and (it was 94° yesterday) so maybe that's why I'm interested
in snow today.


1932

North Curson Street, between Sunset and Hollywood Blvd.
(The date on top is the magazine publication.)


Harry Vallejo


Judith Wood, Paramount screen player who is recovering from an automobile accident, forgot the doctor’s orders and
dashed out into the storm shortly after five o’clock. (photo – Paramount, January 15 1932)



Paramount


1932- Hollywood, CA - View of Hollywood Blvd at dawn in the recent snow storm.


Getty Images


1932, Snow in Silverlake on Allesandro Ave.
(Futterer, Holyland Exhibition, 1932. From the Holyland Exhibition, facing the Whitmore Red Car Trolley Stop on Allesandro Ave.)


Corralitas Red Car Property
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  #42004  
Old Posted May 22, 2017, 2:15 AM
Martin Pal Martin Pal is offline
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1948

Universal Studios after a 1948 snow storm.


Security Pacific National Bank Collection – LAPL


North Hollywood after a rare snowfall in 1948.


LAPL


1948, Greenleaf and Van Nuys – Sherman Oaks


Museum of the San Fernando Valley


Snow blankets the San Fernando Valley in 1948. Looking south on Lindley Avenue from Nordhoff Street.


Water & Power Associates
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  #42005  
Old Posted May 22, 2017, 2:17 AM
Martin Pal Martin Pal is offline
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1949

The following three photographs are attributed to 1949 by their owner, but the title of the blog post is:
MORE PHOTOGRAPHS OF THE GREAT SNOW OF 1949 or was it 1948


Atoll Street, North Hollywood, 1949.


Museum of the San Fernando Valley


Same house, Atoll Street, North Hollywood, 1949.


Museum of the San Fernando Valley


Looking down Atoll Street, North Hollywood, 1949.


Museum of the San Fernando Valley


Welcome to Irvine, 1949.


Irvine Historical Society


Central Avenue, Irvine, 1949.


Irvine Historical Society

A commenter, Bill Scott, writes: "That particular picture looking down Central Avenue towards the general store
and blacksmith shop , was photographed from in front of the Irvine Bean and Grain Grower’s Association warehouse
manager’s home. Although the snow is long gone, the home was saved and relocated to the Duck Club for use by a
24/7 Water District employee thanks to the efforts of the Irvine Historical Society and the Irvine Water District. This
picture was one of many taken by my mother that morning."



The San Gabriel community of Monterey Park after a 1949 snowstorm.


Monterey Park History Collection, Monterey Park Bruggemeyer Library


The 1949 snow storm transformed the San Fernando Valley community of Canoga Park into a winter wonderland. (Love this large evocative photo.)


USC Libraries – Los Angeles Examiner Collection


Canoga Park High School, 1949 view looking north. Topanga Canyon Blvd is the road on the left side.


Canoga Park High School


Snow on Lake Avenue, Pasadena, 1949.
This picture was taken from the Santa Fe railroad track crossing between Maple and Curson,
in what is now in the middle of the 210 Freeway, looking north to Maple, with the original
Lake Avenue Congregational Church on the Northwest corner of Maple and Lake, with its
steeple hidden in the low lying mist.
(There's much more location detail at the link.)


Avenue to the Sky


Rocky chaparral foothills stand above a snowy Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena/La Cañada Flintridge, 1949.


NASA/JPL Archive
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  #42006  
Old Posted May 22, 2017, 2:18 AM
Martin Pal Martin Pal is offline
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1953

A San Bernardino snowman in 1953.


USC Libraries - Los Angeles Examiner Collectio

Last edited by Martin Pal; Aug 5, 2018 at 7:53 PM.
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  #42007  
Old Posted May 22, 2017, 2:19 AM
Martin Pal Martin Pal is offline
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1962

Headlines!


Los Angeles Times


David and Bob Naranjo drag a toboggan down a Tujunga street after the snowstorm of 1962.


Valley Times Collection – LAPL
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  #42008  
Old Posted May 22, 2017, 2:20 AM
Martin Pal Martin Pal is offline
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2007

Snow in Malibu

Jamuary 17, 2007


Malibu Surfside News

Video Link
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  #42009  
Old Posted May 22, 2017, 3:06 AM
Earl Boebert Earl Boebert is offline
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^^^ Can somebody who knows how those streets run tell us whether that is a morning or afternoon shadow?

Cheers,

Earl
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  #42010  
Old Posted May 22, 2017, 3:24 AM
tovangar2 tovangar2 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Martin Pal View Post

1932- Hollywood, CA - View of Hollywood Blvd at dawn in the recent snow storm.


Getty Images
Wow, gorgeous shot.

That's the Hotel Regent (6162 Hollywood Blvd, built by the Christies) in the distance backed by the Taft Building.

Looking the other way, soon after the 1925 Regent was built:

historic hotels of hollywood and los angeles

( the Music Box/ Pix/ Fonda Theater is east of the Hotel Regent across El Centro. A tiny bit of it is visible in the quoted photo too)

Last edited by tovangar2; May 22, 2017 at 4:08 AM. Reason: add link
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  #42011  
Old Posted May 22, 2017, 4:11 AM
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ethereal_reality ethereal_reality is offline
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re: 'mystery' fire location #2

Quote:
Originally Posted by Flyingwedge
Here's the Burlington in a 1915 advertisement. It's unfortunate that the porch along Burlington hasn't survived:

The people sitting on that side porch you mentioned FW, would have been looking at this beauty across the street...



https://www.flickr.com/photos/33756661@N07/

"Exterior front corner view of the Victorian Shingle style residence of wholesale grocer Hans Jevne at 849 South Burlington Avenue, on the northwest corner
of 9th Street and Burlington Avenue, Los Angeles, circa 1890. Three women are standing in the doorway. Samuel and Joseph Carter Newsom were the architects.
The house was finished in 1887 at a cost between $10,000 and $12,000."
-ozfan22
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  #42012  
Old Posted May 22, 2017, 5:05 AM
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And if they looked a little to the left, they would have seen the house across the street on the SW corner at 903 S. Burlington:



William Reagh (1968) at CA State Library


There are building permits to repair chimneys at this house not only in 1933 (April 3) but also 1920 (August 25), apparently
due to damage from the June 21 earthquake in Inglewood that year. The demo permit for this house is dated March 16, 1971.
I wonder if the chimney on the left side of the house survived the February 9, 1971, Sylmar earthquake?

Last edited by Flyingwedge; May 22, 2017 at 5:31 AM. Reason: rhetorical question
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  #42013  
Old Posted May 22, 2017, 5:07 AM
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ethereal_reality ethereal_reality is offline
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I believe we may have another mislabeled photograph. (also a mystery location)


"St. Francis, Gas Station and City Hall" – Los Angeles, 1956, Robert Frank


Museum of Fine Art Houston https://www.mfah.org/art/detail/6530...ank%26page%3D7

First of all, I don't believe the statue is St. Francis. It's the statue of Father Serra, right? (now residing in Father Serra Park across from Union Station)
And as you can see, the building described as City Hall is actually the Hall of Justice.
City Hall isn't visible in the photograph.

So where was the Father Serra statue located in 1956? (the year the photograph was taken)
I realize that is Fort Moore Hill at far right, but I can't pinpoint the exact location of the statue.
__

Last edited by ethereal_reality; May 22, 2017 at 5:22 AM.
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  #42014  
Old Posted May 22, 2017, 5:21 AM
tovangar2 tovangar2 is offline
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Hans Jevne residence

Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post

https://www.flickr.com/photos/33756661@N07/

"Exterior front corner view of the Victorian Shingle style residence of wholesale grocer Hans Jevne at 849 South Burlington Avenue, on the northwest corner
of 9th Street and Burlington Avenue, Los Angeles, circa 1890. Three women are standing in the doorway. Samuel and Joseph Carter Newsom were the architects.
The house was finished in 1887 at a cost between $10,000 and $12,000."
-ozfan22

As oldstuff once noted, by 1920 the Jevnes had moved to 910 S. San Rafael Avenue, Pasadena:


google maps


.................................................................


Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post

"St. Francis, Gas Station and City Hall" – Los Angeles, 1956, Robert Frank


Museum of Fine Art Houston https://www.mfah.org/art/detail/6530...ank%26page%3D7

So where was the Father Serra statue located in 1956? (the year the photograph was taken)

__
It's extremely hard to get one's bearings anymore. Spring and Arcadia looks a little close to the Hall of Justice and Sunset too far, but Calisphere says Sunset and Broadway:

google maps


baist 1921 plate 3

I'm guessing (what's now) Chavez and New High, b/c gas station, but the roads are so reconfigured it's hard to tell:

lanopalera



On the MFAH copy signed and titled by the artist, it says "City Hall, Los Angeles 1956", nothing else.





ETA:

FWIW, this says the statue was "in the middle of Sunset Blvd":


Los Angeles Plaza, Sacred and Contested Space, Wm David Estrada



And this 1937 Herman J. Schultheis shot (looking west) does make it look as though it's out in the road
(there is a traffic island in the historic shot above. I can't tell if the statue is on it.):

lapl

LAPL also says Sunset and Broadway.


lapl (detail)

And there's still a traffic island in approximately the same place. So, looks like a possibility (but it's not "Sunset & Broadway" like the libraries say):

gsv

See also: "Monument statue of Father Junipero Serra on the corner of Sunset Boulevard and Spring Street in Los Angeles" from USC DL




.

Last edited by tovangar2; May 22, 2017 at 8:05 PM. Reason: try to answer e_r's question
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  #42015  
Old Posted May 22, 2017, 7:35 AM
Martin Pal Martin Pal is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Earl Boebert View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Earl Boebert View Post
^^^ Can somebody who knows how those streets run tell us whether that is a morning or afternoon shadow?
Cheers,
Earl

Earl, I was on that corner yesterday. I'm saying that the shadows in that photo are probably around noon.
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  #42016  
Old Posted May 22, 2017, 4:25 PM
Paul C. Koehler Paul C. Koehler is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HossC View Post
It's the Subway Terminal Building.


www.martinturnbull.com

Still there minus the blade sign.


GSV
I believe that the upper picture was taken after rail service ended. The surface yard just south of the building looks to be a parking lot.

Paul C. Koehler
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  #42017  
Old Posted May 22, 2017, 4:52 PM
Paul C. Koehler Paul C. Koehler is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
If you glance out the driver's window as you travel south on the 405 to LAX you'll notice what looks a bit like a water tower
with cascading water in front of it.


GSV




It turns out the mysterious edifice is Al Jolson's final resting place (built in 1951 and designed by architect Paul revere Williams)



ebay




google_earth




http://www.paulrwilliamsproject.org/...morial-shrine/





http://www.paulrwilliamsproject.org/...morial-shrine/




http://www.paulrwilliamsproject.org/...morial-shrine/
__





ianefriedman





Al with a rather striking car with a front fender that resembles a cattle guard.

http://myloveofoldhollywood.blogspot.com/

I'm not sure what that is near the front entrance....it looks like a 'guess-your-weight' machine.

__
The bottom photo is a picture of a "Bruster" custom body and it could be on any manufactures chassis. A lot were done on Ford chassis.

Paul C. Koehler
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  #42018  
Old Posted May 22, 2017, 5:28 PM
BifRayRock BifRayRock is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Martin Pal View Post
Well, since I've been searching NLA for snow posts and googling photos and past weather information and such,
here's a few more snow related photos from Los Angeles and environs that I didn't see posted when I searched the forum.


Judith Wood, Paramount screen player who is recovering from an automobile accident, forgot the doctor’s orders and
dashed out into the storm shortly after five o’clock. (photo – Paramount, January 15 1932)



Paramount





January 9, 1930 - Pico Blvd. (formerly Street), east of Union Avenue. (1500 block of Pico Blvd.
http://hdl.huntington.org/cdm/single...0coll2/id/3685


Contemporary
GoogleSVU








Notice the snow chains.
1913 - at or near Winston Street Garage (122-124 Winston Street) (Source suggests this is in Long Beach. )
http://hdl.huntington.org/cdm/single...coll2/id/13445


126-122 Winston Street
GoogleSVU



I include this image since, at first glance, one might argue the ground looks like it is deceptively covered in slush.



In case you are wondering, it is from this familiar1912- image of the Hotel "Snow."
http://hdl.huntington.org/cdm/single...coll2/id/12562

http://www.skyscraperpage.com/forum/...ostcount=21501




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  #42019  
Old Posted May 22, 2017, 5:28 PM
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odinthor odinthor is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tovangar2 View Post
[...]
This area is interesting too, to me anyway, because of the fascinating, but unsolvable mystery of the location of the previous Plaza (there may have been more than one according so some accounts).

Here's one guess:

nopalera
From my notes on the Plaza: “The location of the [original 1781] public square would nearly correspond to the following lines: The southeast corner of Upper Main and Marchessault streets for the southern or southeastern corner of the square; the east line of Upper Main street, from the above named corner, one hundred varas in a northerly direction, for the east line of the square; the eastern line of New High street for the western line of the square; and the northern line of Marchessault street for the southern line of the square” (Centennial History, p. 21); Narciso Botello, an 1833-1834 arrival, and, with only short interruptions, continuously in L.A. thereafter until his death, rented a structure in 1834 from Jonathan Temple, which structure he stated to have been on the old Plaza, north of the church (Narciso Botello's Annals, my translation and edition, paragraph 12), which agrees with the information supplied in the Centennial History; Ygnacio Garcia, eventual centenarian who first came to L.A. in 1825, stated that the previous Plaza lay southwest of the present one (article in Los Angeles Times, April 23, 1896; likely this was just a slip for northwest); “The new Plaza was laid out at the present site on Main Street in 1818” (Hafen & Hafen, Old Spanish Trail, p. 35); one could guess that it was the new church’s being put into service in 1826 which, because it faced on the new Plaza, reinforced the new Plaza’s importance and thus sent the old Plaza into its final decline (I don’t know of any references to its existence continuing after 1834, the year Botello refers to), and the site of the new Plaza had apparently remained unbuilt-upon because it was used, or intended for use, as a cemetery: “The present plaza was first used as a cemetery” An Illustrated History of Los Angeles County California, 1889 or perhaps 1891, p. 50 footnote.
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  #42020  
Old Posted May 22, 2017, 5:33 PM
Paul C. Koehler Paul C. Koehler is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HossC View Post
The whole movie was uploaded to YouTube last week - I don't know how long it will stay there. It's ages since I watched a hour of silent comedy, but it was very enjoyable, especially the mirror scene near the start.

YouTube link: Seven Years Bad Luck

The mystery house only appears in the last five minutes, and there's no context to give a clue to its location. I didn't spot the mountains either. Here's a couple of close-ups which appear to be taken on the steps in front of the house. NB. I've grayscaled all the screengrabs and tweaked the levels in an attempt to make them clearer.





More risque bathing beauties! It looks like the house had a pool and gardens.



Other locations were easier to spot. All insets are from the 1921 CD at the LAPL.

The A Brownstein & Co. building means that this is La Grande Station.



The Egbert Brothers building was on the corner of Buena Vista Street. The old courthouse would've been just off the left of the picture, but is never seen in the movie. It looks like they used the real county jail (behind the camera).



The sign is a little blurry, but appears to say Mansheffer Drugs. These buildings have now gone.



I couldn't read the sign on this station. I wonder if anyone recognizes it.

I also can not read the sign, but I will say its a Southern Pacific Train. Also the station sign on the end of the building is typical of Southern Pacific Signs. In further studing the picture, there is a third track. Its possible the station is "Tropico" now known as Glendale.

Paul C. Koehler

Last edited by Paul C. Koehler; May 22, 2017 at 5:50 PM.
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