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  #2921  
Old Posted Feb 21, 2011, 12:44 PM
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Most likely taken from the roof of the Town House

LAPL http://jpg3.lapl.org/pics37/00068483.jpg
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  #2922  
Old Posted Feb 21, 2011, 1:29 PM
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Google Street View

A moody morning shot of one of the Town House's second-floor Juliet balconies...
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  #2923  
Old Posted Feb 21, 2011, 7:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by austlar1 View Post
I believe that might be the Westwood Manor, with a few additions, just to the left of the monstrously ugly apartment building at the center of your photo. That looks like the Del Capri(Sp?) Hotel on the corner at the left, and the Westwood Manor occupied the middle part of that same block.

The intersection at roughly the center of the photo is Wilshire & Warner. The church to the right (Westwood Methodist) is still there, as is the "monstrously ugly" high-rise (might have been "modernized" to make it even more monstrously ugly). The interesting aspect of the photo is that it shows the pre-Canyon Wilshire Blvd.

BTW, I grew up in Austin and Ft. Worth, but have lived in LA for going on 17 years.
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  #2924  
Old Posted Feb 21, 2011, 7:38 PM
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This is a sensational site!

It's almost addictive. Hell, it IS addictive. Good job, guys.

PS. I don't know how "noirish" it is, but one of my favorites in L.A. is the former I. Magnin store on Wilshire at New Hampshire. It dates from the mid-late 30s. It is now a Korean mall, but many of the details are intact, including some on the former main floor. You can get a sense of how grand it must have been when it was I. Magnin.

Last edited by jg6544; Feb 21, 2011 at 8:38 PM.
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  #2925  
Old Posted Feb 21, 2011, 9:14 PM
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Interesting pictures

and from one of my favorite films of the forties, but even more interesting, since the first picture is doctored. From the house that was used, and the physical address of the house, you cannot see Malibu Pier, as it is tucked behind two points of land. Also the shape of the coast in the first picture is not what you would see from this address. I wonder how they did it (pre-photo shop) and why. I guess the image of Malibu Pier gave them an atmosphere that the simple coastline would not, still for the time kind of an interesting special effect for little more than atmospherics. In the second shot, the coastline appears to be the genuine article and you'll notice no pier (and distinctly different bluffs and palisades).

Quote:
Originally Posted by sopas ej View Post
Speaking of "Mildred Pierce," the beach house in the film was located at what is now 26652 Latigo Shore Drive in Malibu. The beach house scenes for the film were shot here in December 1944. Here are some cheapie pics I took off of my computer monitor from the "Mildred Pierce" DVD.





Ever notice in movies of that era, that the passenger gets into and out of a car on the driver's side? And, if the car is parked at the curb, the driver will enter/exit the car from the passenger's side? I always thought that was weird.

The house was destroyed after a powerful storm in 1983.

Latigo Shore Drive branches off from PCH just west of Corral Canyon Drive and parallels the shoreline, while PCH continues west, ascending a bluff. But originally, PCH (back then called Roosevelt Highway, which opened in 1929) followed what is now Latigo Shore Drive. In the later 1940s when PCH was rerouted over the bluff, Latigo Shore Drive was turned into a private street, and today the street's name changes as you move from east to west; the street branches off from PCH and is called Seagull Way, then becomes Latigo Shore Drive, and then becomes Malibu Cove Colony Drive: 26652 Latigo Shore Drive, Malibu
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  #2926  
Old Posted Feb 21, 2011, 9:16 PM
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I. Magnin, by way of illustration:

LAPL http://jpg2.lapl.org/pics49/00059118.jpg

Per LAPL: "...the interior of the first floor of I. Magnin & Co. department store at the corner of Wilshire Blvd
and New Hampshire Ave.... 'walls are of Rose de Brignolles marble'.... 'Here are exclusive Magnin accessories,
with individual salons for gifts, negligees, lingerie and corsets, shoes, luggage and leather goods.'... The
store received an award in 1939 from the Lighting Fixtures Industries of Southern California for best lighting
installation. Designed by Myron Hunt."


LAPL http://jpg2.lapl.org/pics49/00059142.jpg


LAPL http://jpg3.lapl.org/pics23/00061256.jpg
Per LAPL: "A two-story Mission Revival residence at 685 South Vermont Avenue, Los Angeles, in the early
1900s. It later became the I. Magnin store parking lot."
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  #2927  
Old Posted Feb 21, 2011, 10:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelRyerson View Post
and from one of my favorite films of the forties, but even more interesting, since the first picture is doctored. From the house that was used, and the physical address of the house, you cannot see Malibu Pier, as it is tucked behind two points of land. Also the shape of the coast in the first picture is not what you would see from this address. I wonder how they did it (pre-photo shop) and why. I guess the image of Malibu Pier gave them an atmosphere that the simple coastline would not, still for the time kind of an interesting special effect for little more than atmospherics. In the second shot, the coastline appears to be the genuine article and you'll notice no pier (and distinctly different bluffs and palisades).
I'm very sure they used a matte; it's an old movie trick. Matte shots were even used during the Silent era, I believe. Sometimes I'll watch an old movie where they use an outside shot of a real building downtown or somewhere else that I know exists, but then surrounding buildings are different (because it's supposed to be set in New York or Chicago or something); then I know that it's a matte shot. This is also how early filmmakers created fictional settings by combining backlot sets with mattes.
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  #2928  
Old Posted Feb 21, 2011, 10:42 PM
jg6544 jg6544 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GaylordWilshire View Post
I. Magnin, by way of illustration:

LAPL http://jpg2.lapl.org/pics49/00059118.jpg

Per LAPL: "...the interior of the first floor of I. Magnin & Co. department store at the corner of Wilshire Blvd
and New Hampshire Ave.... 'walls are of Rose de Brignolles marble'.... 'Here are exclusive Magnin accessories,
with individual salons for gifts, negligees, lingerie and corsets, shoes, luggage and leather goods.'... The
store received an award in 1939 from the Lighting Fixtures Industries of Southern California for best lighting
installation. Designed by Myron Hunt."


LAPL http://jpg2.lapl.org/pics49/00059142.jpg


LAPL http://jpg3.lapl.org/pics23/00061256.jpg
Per LAPL: "A two-story Mission Revival residence at 685 South Vermont Avenue, Los Angeles, in the early
1900s. It later became the I. Magnin store parking lot."
Thanks for posting those pictures, GW. (I need to learn how to post pictures on this site.) The exterior of the building is pretty much the same and the bas-reliefs at various points are alone worth a look-see. The chandelier (or a replica) is still there. I believe it is a Orrefors crystal custom-design for Magnin's. The rose de brignolle marble walls are still visible, too, as are the elevator doors, but the space has been chopped up for small selling spaces. I have read that the upper floors are completely unrecognizable. There are two excellent books about the I. Magnin chain, each full of wonderful photos of the L. A. store. They are, I. Magnin & Co.: A California Legacy, Devin Frick and A Store to Remember, James T. Mullane. Until Federated began to ruin the brand in the '80s, I. Magnin, along with Bergdorf Goodman and pre-expansion Neiman-Marcus genuinely set themselves apart as retailers. Not at all like today when you can't tell Sears from Saks.


P.S. I. Magnin and Bullocks Wilshire were among the first retailers anywhere to recognize the importance of the automobile. Their "main" entrances both consisted of porte-cocheres on the parking lot, not the sidewalk, side of the stores.
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  #2929  
Old Posted Feb 21, 2011, 10:45 PM
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I'm sure a matte process was the only thing they had

for this effect but it's kind of unusual to use it in this sort of a setting and then to forget they needed the pier in subsequent shots from similar angles. Matte shots are usually good for a 'castle' on the hill above a village. Still love these pictures.


Quote:
Originally Posted by sopas ej View Post
I'm very sure they used a matte; it's an old movie trick. Matte shots were even used during the Silent era, I believe. Sometimes I'll watch an old movie where they use an outside shot of a real building downtown or somewhere else that I know exists, but then surrounding buildings are different (because it's supposed to be set in New York or Chicago or something); then I know that it's a matte shot. This is also how early filmmakers created fictional settings by combining backlot sets with mattes.
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  #2930  
Old Posted Feb 21, 2011, 11:32 PM
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hiddenlosangeles.com
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  #2931  
Old Posted Feb 22, 2011, 5:11 AM
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Ah, Gaylord. Great moving gif. I love those Acme semaphore signals. And the one from "Sunset Boulevard," the intersection of Sunset and and Bel Air Road/Beverly Glen Blvd., no less.

Which is why it pains me to see this:


USC Archive

Some guy (or woman) took out an Acme semaphore! In 1952, at the corner of 23rd and Figueroa, according to the caption.
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Last edited by sopas ej; Feb 22, 2011 at 5:53 AM.
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  #2932  
Old Posted Feb 22, 2011, 5:37 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GaylordWilshire View Post
I. Magnin, by way of illustration:

LAPL http://jpg2.lapl.org/pics49/00059118.jpg

Per LAPL: "...the interior of the first floor of I. Magnin & Co. department store at the corner of Wilshire Blvd
and New Hampshire Ave.... 'walls are of Rose de Brignolles marble'.... 'Here are exclusive Magnin accessories,
with individual salons for gifts, negligees, lingerie and corsets, shoes, luggage and leather goods.'... The
store received an award in 1939 from the Lighting Fixtures Industries of Southern California for best lighting
installation. Designed by Myron Hunt."


LAPL http://jpg2.lapl.org/pics49/00059142.jpg


LAPL http://jpg3.lapl.org/pics23/00061256.jpg
Per LAPL: "A two-story Mission Revival residence at 685 South Vermont Avenue, Los Angeles, in the early
1900s. It later became the I. Magnin store parking lot."
I like to go in here after a long day, descend three stories, and partake of the boiling mineral waters and frigid plunge in the Korean-run baths. Plus a nap on one of the beds in front of the giant weird-Korean-show-blaring TVs. Still, it's the three-hour equivalent of 36 hours at a fancy spa: trust me.

Then, back upstairs. Absolved of sin and devoid of poisons, wandering about after (with a polite nod to the security guard) in splendid isolation, taking in the wonders of the largely intact Moderne interior, soothes the soul all the more.
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  #2933  
Old Posted Feb 22, 2011, 5:52 AM
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I. Magnin

The photographs of the interiors when it was I. Magnin are spectacular (all in black and white; I wonder what the colors were like). I'll have to see about going to the upper floors of there are remnants.
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  #2934  
Old Posted Feb 22, 2011, 5:52 AM
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520 North Rossmore, 1936:

USC Archive

520 North Rossmore, Monday, Feb. 21, 2011:

Photo by me

This building has a plaque in front of it, calling the building The Mauretania--"Original moderne-art deco. Built in 1934 by Milton J. Black, architect for Jack Haley - the Tin Man in the Wizard of Oz. Los Angeles residence of President John F. Kennedy. Home to many of L.A.'s illustrious stars and families. Owned at one time by the Ahmanson Family. Part of the preservation of Rossmore Avenue and the Larchmont area."

Apart from the landscaping and the addition of that (unnecessary) fountain and the letter "M"'s, the building looks just like in the old photo, basically. I'm not sure if that's its original color, though. I wish the guy wasn't there playing with his dog, but I wasn't gonna tell him to get out of the shot.
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  #2935  
Old Posted Feb 22, 2011, 6:28 AM
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I can't imagine anyone on this thread isn't familiar with Mackenzie's The Exiles. The film has comparatively recently become famous as one of the Great Lost Documents about Old LA, specifically highlighting maginalized peoples downtown in the late 50s. Its release on DVD might have passed some folk by, in part because, well, it wasn't cheap. It wasn't cheap I'm guessing because (while it would be worth it at twice the price) it included about 9,000 amazing extras. One of which being Mackenzie's 1956 short he did while at USC called, what else, Bunker Hill 1956.

Point being, I'm going to swipe a bunch of screen captures from that DVD extra and put them up here, in slavish worship to its greatness. Now, if you good folk at Milestone, who own the copyright, take issue, I understand. Please send a note and I will remove this post. On the other hand, what I am telling the untold, unwashed masses reading this: your eyes have been blessed with a tiny smidgen of BH56 which is worth one of your fingers in trade. The rest of http://www.exilesfilm.com/ you can judge for yourself.



The criminally underphotographed Down Third From the Other Direction --



There's a nice turn of camera across 144 South Grand, as fetishized over here http://onbunkerhill.org/georgemann#comment-347


Here's 510 +1/2 W 3rd


...which again, in the canon on BH, is an underphotographed structure. That was a taste, anyway. Go here for more.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/3930393...th/5432990786/

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  #2936  
Old Posted Feb 22, 2011, 9:18 AM
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No film I've ever seen more poignantly illustrates 'the vanished city' than Bunker Hill 1956. Watching it mesmerizes me, and breaks my heart, too. Truly a must-see for anyone interested in L.A. history.

-Scott

Last edited by Los Angeles Past; Jun 12, 2012 at 10:03 PM.
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  #2937  
Old Posted Feb 22, 2011, 1:42 PM
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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2tHIN...eature=related


A remnant in plain sight? "Mysterious stairs" behind McKenzie, Brackman, Chaney and Kuzak (ok, 444 S. Flower) in this youtube video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2tHIN...eature=related


Are these stairs a remnant of old Bunker Hill? It looks it on film, but I can't really tell if the concrete is definitely older than the newer construction. Anyone have any ideas of where they may have once led? (Btw--there are no clues on the big 1931 map of downtown....)
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  #2938  
Old Posted Feb 22, 2011, 5:37 PM
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Residential remnant of old Figueroa

Quote:
Originally Posted by sopas ej View Post


Ah, Gaylord. Great moving gif. I love those Acme semaphore signals. And the one from "Sunset Boulevard," the intersection of Sunset and and Bel Air Road/Beverly Glen Blvd., no less.

Which is why it pains me to see this:


USC Archive

Some guy (or woman) took out an Acme semaphore! In 1952, at the corner of 23rd and Figueroa, according to the caption.

Well, I do kind of like seeing the Acme mechanism revealed... and if the Plymouth hadn't taken out the signal, street changes due to the Harbor coming through would have soon enough. The car lot is gone, of course; in its place is a charter school--the brick building in the Google Street View below. Notice the corner of the house to the far left in the vintage shot--it's still there--the Colonial house below--and is now part of the charter school. A new street called Figueroa Way is in front, but the house retains its orientation to Figueroa Street, just slightly east.


Google Street View

Last edited by GaylordWilshire; Feb 22, 2011 at 10:03 PM.
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  #2939  
Old Posted Feb 22, 2011, 10:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sopas ej View Post
520 North Rossmore, 1936:

USC Archive

520 North Rossmore, Monday, Feb. 21, 2011:

Photo by me

This building has a plaque in front of it, calling the building The Mauretania--"Original moderne-art deco. Built in 1934 by Milton J. Black, architect for Jack Haley - the Tin Man in the Wizard of Oz. Los Angeles residence of President John F. Kennedy. Home to many of L.A.'s illustrious stars and families. Owned at one time by the Ahmanson Family. Part of the preservation of Rossmore Avenue and the Larchmont area."

Apart from the landscaping and the addition of that (unnecessary) fountain and the letter "M"'s, the building looks just like in the old photo, basically. I'm not sure if that's its original color, though. I wish the guy wasn't there playing with his dog, but I wasn't gonna tell him to get out of the shot.

This is an excellent before/after photo sopas_ej. I hope you do more of them!

p.s. I like the kid and his dog.
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  #2940  
Old Posted Feb 22, 2011, 10:58 PM
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Just like we've been doing on this thread...

____________________


Larry Harnisch over at latimesblog found this small blurb from 1908 about homes sales
in the Westlake district. So he googled the address 690 Burlington Ave.



latimes



Surprise! It's still there.


google street view



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He did the same with this ad.


latimes





The same building today over a hundred years later.


google street view
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