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  #7701  
Old Posted Today, 1:44 AM
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Originally Posted by Flavius Josephus View Post
Per Eater, it lost a lot of money. http://la.eater.com/2013/10/1/636128...tly-last-night. That's not unusual for bars and restaurants anywhere - it's a tough industry, and there's a lot of competition.

But it's good news that, on a macro level, DTLA seems to still be seeing net growth in the number of places to eat and drink. Suggests the fundamentals are still very strong, even if individual businesses sometimes fail.
Anecdotally, there are a ton more people walking around on any given night than in previous years. I can remember taking out the dog and not seeing another person at all just three or four years ago. That never happens any more. And where I live, that's not a result of new residential I think - just more people coming in for nightlife.
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  #7702  
Old Posted Today, 2:00 AM
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Originally Posted by brudy View Post
Anecdotally, there are a ton more people walking around on any given night than in previous years. I can remember taking out the dog and not seeing another person at all just three or four years ago. That never happens any more. And where I live, that's not a result of new residential I think - just more people coming in for nightlife.
I have to say that even though I really liked the atmosphere at the Parish...and I used to frequent Angelique Cafe (before they closed), I was not big on the menu at the Parish. The building is beautiful and I cannot wait to give the new restaurant a try.
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  #7703  
Old Posted Today, 3:36 AM
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Neon being added to the facade of cliftons.
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  #7704  
Old Posted Today, 5:37 AM
Docjalby Docjalby is offline
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Originally Posted by brudy View Post
Anecdotally, there are a ton more people walking around on any given night than in previous years. I can remember taking out the dog and not seeing another person at all just three or four years ago. That never happens any more. And where I live, that's not a result of new residential I think - just more people coming in for nightlife.
So right now we have 57,000 residents in DTLA. 5 years ago it was about 48,000. With what is under construction right now we will have enough housing to fit about 70,000 by 2017. We will probably hit 100,000 in 2020 to 2022 assuming that there isn't another recession and the buildings stop building.
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  #7705  
Old Posted Today, 6:08 AM
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Trust me, 100k by 2020 would be amazing but as of right now the population is roughly at 54k at most. If we somehow managed to double our population in 5 years then we would need about several dozen onni sized towers.
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  #7706  
Old Posted Today, 6:46 AM
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Few pics from today. More to come tomorrow.











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  #7707  
Old Posted Today, 2:14 PM
Flavius Josephus Flavius Josephus is offline
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Originally Posted by Mojeda101 View Post
Trust me, 100k by 2020 would be amazing but as of right now the population is roughly at 54k at most. If we somehow managed to double our population in 5 years then we would need about several dozen onni sized towers.
54k is the DCBID Q3 2014 estimate. But getting to 100k need not mean 50 story towers - when you look at NY neighborhoods like Greenwich Village or Williamsburg, most of the density comes from a TON of low-to-mid rise building, with very few skyscrapers. Same for most European cities. Perhaps parking requirements and disability access regulations may make it uneconomic to build like that in DTLA, but if not, then DTLA could add a huge amount of population by replacing smaller parking lots and single story commercial buildings with that type of construction.

We've gotten used to block-sized projects, be they high rise or stucco box. But even when suitable sites for those run out, there's a lot of opportunities left for smaller-lot projects.
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  #7708  
Old Posted Today, 4:00 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brudy View Post
Anecdotally, there are a ton more people walking around on any given night than in previous years.
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Originally Posted by Mojeda101 View Post
Neon being added to the facade of cliftons.
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Originally Posted by DTLAdenizen View Post
Few pics from today. More to come tomorrow.
I like these type of postings! They help give everyone a better sense of what's going on in dt, of changes to it, in both words & pics.

LA has long needed....desperately so....an urban hood that was more than one street wide, one street long, & in a mainly burban context, like Samo with its pier & 3rd st promenade, or old town pasadena, or venice or manicured devlpts like the grove or americana in glendale. So to see the pieces of the puzzle being fitted together is way overdue & a quite a relief.

clifton's page at yelp listed a reopening in december 2014, but was removed a few months ago. A yelper posting there says she called cliftons & was told the opening has been pushed forward to march. however, the owner must be really struggling with both the budget & logistics of the proj. I hope the delay after delay in getting that restaurant open....at least a yr or two longer than what was originally predicted....isn't a sign he's gotten way more than he bargained for. The success of such a proj is a too crucial for broadway, so failure is not an option.

more food news.....

Quote:
10 great places for food lovers in the Downtown Arts District




By S. Irene Virbila


For those who don’t live downtown, Saturdays are a great day to visit the sprawling Downtown Arts District. There’s a lot happening and much of it is walkable once you find a parking spot for car or bike or jump off the bus. On Saturdays, two of the best food trucks also park in front of Blue Bottle Coffee and Stumptown, respectively. Art galleries are generally open, quirky shops and boutiques too.

Every third Sunday, you can pop into Artists & Fleas on Mateo Street. That’s the L.A. version of the flea market that started out in Brooklyn. It’s mostly crafts and vintage clothing, but you can find hand-made cutting boards or indigo-dyed napkins too. Some great food trucks are usually parked out front.

As rich as the Arts District is, especially in terms of world-class coffee, more is to come in the first quarter of 2015. The One Santa Fe complex will include the high-end GROW market from Manhattan Beach, yet another Café Gratitude and BOL, an Asian spot from Andrea Uyeda, former COO of Border Grill. To add to the impressive ice cream choices in L.A., New York-based Van Leeuwen Ice Cream plans a shop there too.



Bestia in the Arts District
The rough industrial chic exterior of Bestia in the Arts District
Fred Seidman Photography


Bestia — In a sprawling loft complex is the wildly popular Italian restaurant Bestia, from Ori Menashe and his wife, pastry chef Genevieve Gergis. After more than two years, Bestia is still one of the toughest reservations in town. That’s because the menu isn’t the same old generic Italian you see all over L.A... With its high energy and fashionable crowd, Bestia feels more like something in New York’s meatpacking district than anything we’ve experienced in downtown L.A.

Blacktop Coffee — Tyler Wells, one of the Handsome Coffee Roasters founders, peeled off to do his own project, the tiny Blacktop Coffee next to Wurstküche on East 3rd Street. Blacktop feels personal and inviting, just the place to pop by for an espresso made from San Francisco’s Sightglass Coffee beans. The cold brew is terrific. And if you’re into mochas, he makes his with real chocolate.

Blue Bottle Coffee Co. — Blue Bottle is the San Francisco phenom. They have a cafe in Venice, but last year the pioneering coffee company bought out Handsome Coffee Roasters, bringing some of the staff on board... The place is always almost bursting with downtown types sipping the only-for-L.A.



The goods at Bread Lounge in the Arts District
There's always a line for pastries, sandwiches and
freshly baked loaves at Bread Lounge in the Arts District.
Fred Seidman Photography


Bread Lounge — Ran Zimon’s pointy baguettes, made with just flour, water and salt, are some of the best in town. Zimon uses his own natural yeast, and the process from mixing the dough to pulling the loaf from the oven takes 48 hours. Small wonder that there’s always a line at the retail bakery... There’s borek, focaccia, quiche and sandwiches both hot and cold, and a constant parade of people picking up big lunch orders to go.

Cerveteca — Oscar Hermosillo has brought his Cerveteca concept to the former R23 space on East 3rd Street, making this the place for oysters, ceviche, Peruvian tiradito — and Baja fish tacos. He’s got barbacoa and vegetarian versions too. At dinner, all that, plus platos grandes such as churrasco ribeye steak, red snapper a la Veracruzana and a board piled with housemade sausages, bacon — and sauerkraut.



Church & State, a French Bistro in the Arts District is packed
on a Saturday night in 2014.
Barbara Davidson / Los Angeles Times


Church & State — Just across 7th Street in the old Nabisco Biscuit Co., the French bistro Church & State draws a Francophile crowd. It looks like a party with piazza lights strung across the ceiling and tables of exuberant diners toasting each other with Champagne or rosé.



The Factory Kitchen in the Arts District
Wine is poured in the main dining room at Factory Kitchen,
a minimally redecorated loft space in 2013.
Ricardo DeAratanha / Los Angeles Times


The Factory Kitchen — Ex-Valentino chef Angelo Auriana came back to L.A. to open this soulful Italian restaurant on the edge of the Arts District. The space is brick-walled, industrial, with simple tables and chairs and a menu of Italian specialties. There’s a lovely calamari salad, steamed clams with garbanzo beans, and chicken liver crostini with crushed pistachios to start.

The Springs — Inside this vegan-themed business, which includes a yoga studio and wellness spa, is an organic juice bar and raw vegan restaurant. The space is open and light-filled, a great place to sit down with a glass of cold-pressed organic juice or a smoothie.

Stumptown Coffee Roasters — It’s hard to snag a table on the sidewalk veranda in front of Portland-based Stumptown Coffee Roasters, especially on Saturday when the Free Range food truck is parked out front serving up fried chicken and egg dishes. Stumptown takes coffee seriously, without being twee about it.

Urban Radish — One block over from Church & State is the stealth gourmet market Urban Radish. The name is painted on the side of the building, but there’s no real sign. What a surprise then when you pull into the parking lot and see a cook barbecuing outside on the weekends. Inside is a full-fledged market for people who actually cook. The prices are fair, and they’ve got just about everything you need, even a meat counter with an in-house butcher and organic chickens, grass-fed or grass-finished beef, pasture-raised pork and lamb, and handmade sausages.

^ seeing signs of life springing up in pockets of the gritty east side of dt....which originally was as dormant as any hood could possibly be....is a good example of where there's a will, there's a way.
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  #7709  
Old Posted Today, 4:14 PM
citywatch citywatch is offline
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Originally Posted by Flavius Josephus View Post
when you look at NY neighborhoods like Greenwich Village or Williamsburg, most of the density comes from a TON of low-to-mid rise building, with very few skyscrapers. Same for most European cities.
exactly! that's why the desire of the city council member in dtla or other ppl to ban more lowrise apt devlpt always puzzles me. for one thing, there's no guarantee that demand for more housing in the hood will be strong enough during the next 50 yrs to allow anything & everything to be built...including very tall residential towers.

for another thing, there still is a HUGE number of sites throughout dt that need to be filled in. that's why when ppl like jose Huizar or others start complaining about a new devlpt being too short, I wonder if they're dealing with the same dtla that I'm aware of, or if they spend much time there at all. I know whenever I drop by the hood, all the locations that desperately require new devlpt never fail to pop up at me at the last minute & catch me off guard.
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