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  #11801  
Old Posted Jan 23, 2013, 12:44 AM
tovangar2 tovangar2 is offline
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sorry, double post

Last edited by tovangar2; Jan 23, 2013 at 2:07 AM.
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  #11802  
Old Posted Jan 23, 2013, 12:45 AM
DouglasUrantia DouglasUrantia is offline
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Nostalgia...1966

Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
I thought this 'modern' Egyptian Theater was a different theater than Grauman's original Egyptian until I noticed the 'Pig N' Whistle'
building on the right. (the slide is dated 1966)


slide/ebay







The Egyptian Theater is at the extreme left in this view. (also from 1966)


__
Thanks for posting....they really take me back to my youth. I used to have weekends off in my Navy days. Hollywood in 1966 was one of my targets.

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  #11803  
Old Posted Jan 23, 2013, 12:48 AM
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You're welcome.
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  #11804  
Old Posted Jan 23, 2013, 12:53 AM
tovangar2 tovangar2 is offline
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Westmoore/Westmore Hotel 7th & Francisco

Quote:
Originally Posted by AlvaroLegido View Post
I guess you are suspecting right, Ethereal.
If we look to the Fremont Hotel (1880's) and then to the Bradbury Building (1893), we notice that the simplification of lines increases every ten years (to the 1970's I guess). The Westmore looks simpler than the Bradbury. So I'd say it was built in the 1900's.
It was there for sure in 1909 near that group of 8 or 9 churches that had migrated to this area from Pershing Square and environs:

http://www.bigmapblog.com/2011/birds...f-los-angeles/

There was a fashion for the classical just after the turn of the twentieth century: Angel's Flight Station House, The Pacific Mutual Building and (stretching it a bit) Central Station.

But anyway, I thought the Alexandria stole every other hotel's thunder when it was built in 1905.
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  #11805  
Old Posted Jan 23, 2013, 1:13 AM
malumot malumot is offline
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I think they have it OK on the map there, Tov.

Appears Francisco had something of a slope south of Seventh, so you get one of those "4 stories in front/6 in the back" set-ups we are familiar with.

Not unlike - but cannot hold a candle to - The Sawyer. (Was looking for a pic of the REAR of the Sawyer....what was it......8 stories for sure.....maybe 9) And a very nondescript 3 stories in front.




Here we go. The Sawyer, in rear, with the Richfield tower seemingly sprouting from its roof. And down Hope....look who's poking its head out.....but the LA Library....



Quote:
Originally Posted by tovangar2 View Post
It was there for sure in 1909 near that group of 8 or 9 churches that had migrated to this area from Pershing Square and environs:

http://www.bigmapblog.com/2011/birds...f-los-angeles/

The hotel supposedly built in 1880 was only four stories. The one in the photos may have been a replacement on the same, or a nearby, site. There was a fashion for the classical just after the turn of the twentieth century: Angel's Flight Station House, The Pacific Mutual Building and (stretching it a bit) Central Station.

But anyway, I thought the Alexandria stole every other hotel's thunder when it was built in 1905.

Last edited by malumot; Jan 23, 2013 at 1:28 AM.
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  #11806  
Old Posted Jan 23, 2013, 2:28 AM
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ethereal_reality ethereal_reality is online now
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Former site of the Hotel Westmoore at the southwest corner of 7th St. & Francisco. Hmmm...what's behind those trees?








A massive garage! A garage so huge it gives me the creeps.


google aerial
__

Last edited by ethereal_reality; Jan 23, 2013 at 2:42 AM.
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  #11807  
Old Posted Jan 23, 2013, 2:47 AM
Chuckaluck Chuckaluck is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rcarlton View Post
We haven't touched on the mysterious case of Thomas Harper Ince yet.
. . . . . . .
Rumor also has it that Hearst paid off Ince's mortgage on his Château Élysée apartment building in Hollywood.

Wikepedia

. . . . . . .
Apologies if these are second run.

Built in '29 by Eleanor Ince, widow of prematurely dead pioneer film producer Thomas H. Ince. Designed as a luxury hotel/apartment house. In '51 the building was converted to Senior living and operated as the "Manor Hotel." The building is currently owned and occupied by the Church of Scientology.

1929




1951
All from Lapl
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  #11808  
Old Posted Jan 23, 2013, 3:00 AM
Chuckaluck Chuckaluck is offline
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Country Club Manor, 316 N. Rossmore Built in 1926. Obviously a very popular style.

1927




From Lib.Ca.Gov
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  #11809  
Old Posted Jan 23, 2013, 3:28 AM
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I have an old KHJ recording I was given and decided to look it up and listen to it while looking at the Egyptian photographs ER posted. So many great posts today!
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  #11810  
Old Posted Jan 23, 2013, 3:35 AM
tovangar2 tovangar2 is offline
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Country Club Manor

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chuckaluck View Post
Country Club Manor, 316 N. Rossmore Built in 1926.
Yet another building I'm extremely familiar with (you lot aren't following me around, right?). The units actually aren't much. Windowless kitchens and baths. Pretty cramped. Original(?) elevators with gates are very slow. Higher units look down on the Wishire CC parking lot. Afternoon sun is relentless in summer.
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  #11811  
Old Posted Jan 23, 2013, 4:26 AM
BifRayRock BifRayRock is offline
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Cudahy Meat Packing. Yes, same family named the City of Cudahy.


Circa 1900 - Cudahy Meat Packing
Lib.Ca.Gov

1928


From Lapl

1930 - Cudahy Packing 803 S Macy Street
Lapl

1939 - Cudahy Packing 803 Macy Street, LA
Lapl

Macy Street Overpass - Cudahy Packing in background


1933
USC Digital

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  #11812  
Old Posted Jan 23, 2013, 4:29 AM
BifRayRock BifRayRock is offline
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More Cudahy - related?

Interesting writeup about the "Jinx" mansion formerly at 7269 Hollywood Boulevard (Fuller and Hollywood). Read about it and the bad luck that seemed to afflict some of its occupants here : http://articles.latimes.com/2006/sep/03/local/me-then3 and here: http://allanellenberger.com/hollywoods-jinx-mansion/

Built by George Ralphs, (the grocery store chain) and lived in owned or rented by Hollywood notables, including Louella Parsons, Doug Fairbanks, Jos. Schenk and Mrs. Norma Talmadge Schenk. Some Noir'ers may find noteworthy the shotgun suicide of Meat Packing Heir, alleged mental patient, ne'er-do-well and model citizen, Jack Cudahy(yes, the City of Cudahy is named after the family. ). There is also mention of a peripheral suicide-by-scissors. Home was eventually replaced in or around 1940 by the Peyton Hall apartment complex. Of course, this being Los Angeles-Hollywood, the complex was raised in the early '80s and replaced with something far more nondescript.

http://allanellenberger.com


http://flapperdays.blogspot.com

Last edited by BifRayRock; Jan 23, 2013 at 4:40 AM.
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  #11813  
Old Posted Jan 23, 2013, 7:17 AM
tovangar2 tovangar2 is offline
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Architects' own houses/Irving Gill/the Mann Act

Its interesting, and sometimes instructive, to see where architects choose to live (and helps get one's mind off slaughterhouses):

Paul R Williams Residence (1952) 1690 S Victoria, Los Angeles (Karen E Hudson, William's granddaughter, lives there now):

wiki

Stiles O Clements Residence (1935) 708 N Linden Dr, Beverly Hills

gsv 2011

(If I didn't know better, I would have mixed them up.)

Irving 'Jack' Gill (1870-1936), a personal favorite, was notoriously focused on his work and uncaring about where he lived in the 10 years or more he was in Los Angeles. His practice remained throughout at 913 S Figueroa (a house owned by CS Fout, then converted into offices and lodgings, now a parking lot), across the street from the 1900 Friday Morning Clubhouse (later below, as viewed from Gill's offices) later replaced by Allison & Allison's Variety Arts Building (I'm sorry Gill didn't get the commission, he was an unflagging supporter of progressive causes and a champion of women's rights) and up the block from the future site of the YWCA Hotel (now the Figueroa). Gill planned for offices in the then-new Parkinson and Bergstrom 1912 building (now the Rowan) at the NE corner of 5th and Spring for the Torrance project, but I cannot confirm he ever moved there:

baist 1910, plate 8


Islandora cc pierce

Gill first lived in the Van Nuys Hotel (Morgan & Walls, 1896, 4th & Main), now the Barclay:

water and power.org
(I'm forever amazed at how many of our skyscrapers had awnings.)

A writing corner in the Van Nuys Hotel main lobby:

lapl

He later moved to a room at 1406 Alvarado Terrace (built 1902, sale pending at $475k}:

gsv

№ 1406 has a bit of a pedigree. Built on spec, the first owner was Manuel Riveroll, son of the Governor of Baja California. This image of the Riveroll home is from ca 1904:


uscdl

Then Gill moved to a room at 1353 S Burlington. That 1906 house, and its next-door twin, were moved to 1149-1153 Queen Anne Place (just east of LAHS) in 1923. The Swedish Lutheran Angelica Church by Gustav S Larson, was built on the original site in 1925.

The former 1353 Burlington (right), now 1149 Queen Anne Pl:

gsv

Gill also lived at Sullivanesque 1507 S Hoover. It was demolished in 1967 and replaced by an apartment building:

lapl

The three addresses immediately above are within a couple of blocks of each other and all were an easy commute to his office.

Gill may have also rented in Santa Monica (or he may have just stayed there with friends) while he supervised the building of Horatio West Court. There's very little documentation on Gill's life and work. When he closed his LA office he sent "ten truck-loads" of papers, correspondence and drawings to a friend for storage. After Gills death, no one remembered who the friend was. Gill's papers have never been found.

In 1928 Jack married Mrs. Marion Waugh Brashears, a beautiful, though domineering, divorcee and heiress, whom he had known for 10 years. They lived in the Palos Verdes Estates (PV had been designed by Gill's friend, Frederick Law Olmsted) at her home, 2325 Via Pinale (below). Although Marion had known Jack for six years at that point, she commissioned David Witmer (1888-1973) of Witmer & Watson to design the PV home in 1924. Gill designed the gardens. Witmer, like Gill, also built in reinforced concrete and integrated the homes he designed into their gardens (but, IMHO, exhibiting much less intelligence and intellectual rigor). In 1928 Witmer co-designed, with a host of others, the Architects Building on the SE corner of 5th and Fig (816 W 5th). It fell with the Richfield in favor of ARCO Plaza. He went on to design the Pentagon in 1941.

Gill didn't move his offices to the Architects Building, maybe because Elmer Gray kept his practice there (Gray had called Gill's work "dangerous"). I don't know if the rift between Gill and Gray and Goodhue ever healed after the San Diego Panama-Californian Exposition (1915-1917) debacle. (But every time I see Central Library I swear I can hear Gill laughing in amusement.)

2325 Via Pinale



3 of 14 images of the "Brashears Residence" @ http://www.flickr.com/photos/pvlocal...n/photostream/

Just look at the stair rail in the last pic. No wonder Gill had a heart attack. Sheesh.

2325 Via Pinale (July 2011)

gsv

The egalitarian Gill disliked PV, stuffed, as it was, with Marion's society friends, saying it was "too fancy" for him. In any case, Jack's health failed in less than a year and he went to live, alone, on a small avocado ranch Marion owned in Carlsbad, later moving to Oceanside for some civic commissions (City Hall, a fire station, the Americanization School, etc) and then back to Carlsbad where he died in Carlsbad Hospital in 1936 from his second heart attack, Marion and Louis Gill (Jack's nephew and former partner) were with him at the end. Gill gave his profession as "laborer" when he was taken to Carlsbad Hospital. That designation was transferred to his death certificate. His ashes were scattered.

Jack Gill consistently stressed three basic concepts: honesty, simplicity and democracy. He asserted that the architectural ideal of the West should be realized in the small home.

The Walter Dodge House (1914-16), callously destroyed in Gill's centenary year, is rightly known as Gill's masterwork. But Gill actually liked more modest houses. Two bed/one bath Morgan House (1917), below, was a favorite of his (and mine). He never built a home for himself, but did try on occasion living in small homes he designed for working-class families to see if they were truly "livable".

Morgan House (1917), 626 N Arden Street, Los Angeles (south facade):

LAcurbed

(That's not pea gravel, it's decomposed granite)

Looking NE:

yorgos


Gill's simple fireplaces were often surrounded with Batchelder tile. Floors were stained and polished concrete as here at Morgan House:

spin LPs/flickr

Inside, looking out:

spin LPs/flickr

Morgan House in the 1970s at its nadir (although at least the red and white striped, metal awnings had been removed):

via Marvin Rand

Morgan House 2011:

flickr

Morgan House, as viewed from the road, in 2016

gsv


Also see John Crosse for a write-up on another extant small home by Gill, the Adelaide Chapin House in Silver Lake.


Most info from:
Irving Gill and the Architecture of Reform by Thomas S Hinds, 2000, Montachelli Press
-and-
Garden Cities at Risk CHAPTER TWO: The Wyvernwood Architects – Witmer & Watson by Steven Keylon
http://baldwinhillsvillageandthevill...apter-two.html


Not forgetting this is noirish Los Angeles, there is a bit of a noiry story in here somewhere. Maury Diggs, a friend and former important member of Gill's staff got himself arrested under the Mann Act the same year that Gill moved to Los Angeles. The story hit the LA papers and Gill was mentioned in a sensational article on the front page of the Times (not the intro to LA Gill was looking for). It seems that Diggs (then a well-known architect in Sacramento working for the State, he later designed the Fox Theater in San Francisco and co-designed San Quentin of all places) and his pal Farley Drew Camenetti (the son of a former state senator), both in their mid-twenties, took their "society-girl" mistresses across state lines to Reno, Nevada (they'd missed the train to LA, which is where they really wanted to go). Tipped off by the wives (who complained loudly of their husbands' "champagne orgies"), the cops nabbed Maury and Drew and hauled them to San Francisco to stand trial. Diggs was adamant that the Mann Act shouldn't apply, "I am not guilty of being a white slaver. If every man that committed the same crime was put in jail there would not be many people out of doors."

Jack Gill, who never thought ill of a friend and was genuinely sympathetic to human weakness, gave a statement in Digg's defense:

"Maury Diggs is as fine a specimen of young manhood as one ever meets and one of the best young architects in the country...Mr. Diggs is a handsome, moody, young romancer, a type of whom women, particularly young women, are prone to make a shrine, a man who's moods demand sympathy, who works overzealously...becomes depressed, goes out, meets a sympathizer, pours imaginary woes into her ear and then - the inevitable"

That didn't help. The men were found guilty. Diggs got two years, Camenetti 18 months. The appeal went all the way to the US Supreme Court (the newspapers fanning the country-wide "white slavery" hysteria the whole time) which upheld the verdict in 1917. While waiting out the appeal, Diggs divorced his wife and married his mistress before doing time (and then going back to being a successful architect).

Gill was flummoxed, but then he was a man "every woman wanted to marry" (men liked him too). Gill may not have cared where he lived but he was always beautifully dressed in custom clothes and shoes of the finest materials and workmanship. He had gorgeous, thick, black hair, a beautiful voice, an extremely engaging, truly shining intelligence, boundless enthusiasm and bags of genuine charm. He seemed to think that, where women were concerned, certain men were helpless sitting ducks who could not be blamed for the "inevitable" consequences of their attractiveness.

Forever after, even if people could no longer quite remember the details of the Diggs/Camenetti "white slavery" case, a slight aura of noir surrounded Gill.

More info on the case plus everything one ever needs to know about the Mann Act:

http://www.insidebayarea.com/oakland...ws/ci_13869441
http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive...DA415B858DF1D3
http://www.pbs.org/unforgivableblack...kout/mann.html


James Robert Mann (1856-1922):

library of congress



(Thx to GW for the corrections and pix:
http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...ostcount=11817
http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...postcount=2139)



UPDATE: The Irving J Gill Foundation was formed in 2015.

Last edited by tovangar2; Jun 16, 2017 at 10:00 PM. Reason: New pix & corrections
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  #11814  
Old Posted Jan 23, 2013, 7:42 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
The multistory The Players Supper Club on Sunset Boulevard.


http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...&postcount=926


The Players building today.


gsv

__
Regarding the construction of The Players, here's a quote from Between Flops: A Biography of Preston Sturges by James Curtis [Harcourt Brace Javonovich 1982]:

"Above Sunset . . . was a home that had belonged to the father of actor Chester Morris. That home, now a wedding chapel, for some indefinable reason, formed the basis for what Sturges ultimately designed. He pictured three stories, three separate operations. On the street level, a drive-in with counter service. On the second level, an informal restaurant for sit-down dining. The top – the house itself – would be strictly formal, a coat and tie required at all times. Sturges decided to leave the old Morris house where it was and, instead of building on top of it, directed that the hill be dug from underneath and that The Players be built from the top down. It was costlier that way – much more expensive than demolishing the old house and building from scratch – but Sturges couldn’t be budged."

Not the best picture, but the only one I could find. I guess most of the old house is hidden behind the 2nd story of The Players. The tile roof is the only clue:

LAPL http://photos.lapl.org/carlweb/jsp/F...Number=5126385
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  #11815  
Old Posted Jan 23, 2013, 2:09 PM
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GaylordWilshire GaylordWilshire is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tovangar2 View Post
Its interesting, and sometimes instructive, to see where architects choose to live


[Re Irving Gill] 1507 S Hoover:

gsv

In 1928 Jack married Mrs.Marion Waugh Brashears, a beautiful, though domineering, widow and heiress, who he had known for 10 years. They lived in the Palos Verdes Estates (PV had been designed by Gill's friend, Frederick Law Olmstead)

Interesting post, tovangar, just two tiny things. That's not 1507 S Hoover, but rather 1513/1515. The apartment building numbered 1501/3/5 now sits on the site of 1507, which is pictured, in part, here: http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...postcount=2139


Also... it's Olmsted, not Olmstead. I know that may seem picayune, but followers of his work go ballistic with the all-too-common misspelling. (Something learned the hard way working for a shelter magazine in my youth.)
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  #11816  
Old Posted Jan 23, 2013, 8:12 PM
tovangar2 tovangar2 is offline
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Irving Gill

Quote:
Originally Posted by GaylordWilshire View Post
Interesting post, tovangar, just two tiny things. That's not 1507 S Hoover, but rather 1513/1515. The apartment building numbered 1501/3/5 now sits on the site of 1507, which is pictured, in part, here: http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...postcount=2139


Also... it's Olmsted, not Olmstead. I know that may seem picayune, but followers of his work go ballistic with the all-too-common misspelling. (Something learned the hard way working for a shelter magazine in my youth.)
Thank you so much GW. Not picayune at all. "Olmstead" was a stupid typo, I'm kicking myself.

Last edited by tovangar2; Jun 2, 2017 at 8:32 PM.
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  #11817  
Old Posted Jan 23, 2013, 10:36 PM
Lwize Lwize is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chuckaluck View Post
Whatever happened to Love's on Pico?
google
I grew up around the corner from it. My friends and I used to ride our bikes through the site while it was under construction around 1971/72.

I miss their amazing BBQ beans and Texas beef ribs.
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  #11818  
Old Posted Jan 23, 2013, 11:11 PM
DouglasUrantia DouglasUrantia is offline
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Doll House Dinners

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lwize View Post
I grew up around the corner from it. My friends and I used to ride our bikes through the site while it was under construction around 1971/72.

I miss their amazing BBQ beans and Texas beef ribs.
I agree, their food was quite good and well prepared. But they had one big problem...the portions were child size. Any restaurant chain that's chintzy on portion size, is doomed to eventual failure.
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  #11819  
Old Posted Jan 24, 2013, 6:04 AM
Godzilla Godzilla is offline
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Wilshire and Cloverdale. 5401 Wilshire. Building contours retained over the years. Previously featured here and other places:
http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...postcount=7169

1939

http://www.ilovelabut.com


1978 seems like yesterday.

Lapl


http://www.you-are-here.com/modern/sontag.html

http://www.ilovelabut.com


1940 with more detail.
USC Digital
Is that a clip-on?



1939
USC Digital


We Must Take C Of O??




1938 - Another Sontag on Brand in Glendale
Lapl

Last edited by Godzilla; Jan 24, 2013 at 6:14 AM.
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  #11820  
Old Posted Jan 24, 2013, 7:27 AM
Chuckaluck Chuckaluck is offline
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11739 Victory Blvd, North Hollywood - Originally built in '41. Interesting detail. Could window dissymmetry be original?

google]



Heywood Wakefield
google
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