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  #11621  
Old Posted Jan 17, 2013, 4:35 PM
BifRayRock BifRayRock is offline
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Originally Posted by GaylordWilshire View Post


This is the northeast corner of Wilshire and La Brea... I think the arrow is pointing in the right direction.

Absolutely correct. Occasionally, one gets pleasantly lost in the minutiae and forgets that the E Clem Wilson building is a relative newcomer to the neighborhood (1930).

Flickr



1928 - Northeast corner of Wilshire and La Brea
USC Digital

Circle Theatre. It would seem that the right weather conditions (Santa Ana winds) and excessive use of the fireplace connected to the chimney at right, might result in a potential Herald Examiner headline.


Function of the divot in the street? Vent? Is the large building with the prominent fire escape the Pacific Telephone Exchange?



Name of the coffee shop - steak house next door to Harbold Bros shop?





1928 (Are there any better posts of the building/cafe that preceded Tilford's (at left)?)
Lapl

Tilford's
http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...postcount=6842



What a difference in a few years. Divot is still there and the Pacific Telephone Exchange building (or what later became the PTEB) is still at three stories.
USC Digital






Last edited by BifRayRock; Jan 17, 2013 at 5:36 PM.
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  #11622  
Old Posted Jan 17, 2013, 4:58 PM
BifRayRock BifRayRock is offline
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1938 - Santa Anas
lapl
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  #11623  
Old Posted Jan 17, 2013, 5:46 PM
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GaylordWilshire GaylordWilshire is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BifRayRock View Post
1928 (Are there any better posts of the building/cafe that preceded Tilford's (at left)?)
Lapl

http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...postcount=6838

http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...postcount=6842


BTW--I am NOT a fan of the revamped USC Digital Library site. In addition to having seemed to have rendered all previous direct links to its photos void--I was able to fix two of the three in the link to post 6838 above--I find it incredibly cumbersome and slow. Not that I'm a computer graphics wiz, but zooming is available on any computer, and cropping is easy with any number of other programs. Also...the USC site seems to have more pages of old USC Trojan newspapers than pictures.... (Just my 2¢.)
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  #11624  
Old Posted Jan 17, 2013, 5:48 PM
BifRayRock BifRayRock is offline
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"Ice Cream," "Radio," "J.J. Newberry's - on both Wilshire and La Brea" and "Owl Drugs." Bank and Theaters around the corner! (Not sure what business is to the right of Newberrys on La Brea.) (Where are all of the paper airplanes from the open windows nearer the sky?)

1930s (?)







All from USC Digital

Last edited by BifRayRock; Jan 17, 2013 at 6:09 PM.
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  #11625  
Old Posted Jan 17, 2013, 6:03 PM
BifRayRock BifRayRock is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GaylordWilshire View Post
http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...postcount=6838

http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...postcount=6842


BTW--I am NOT a fan of the revamped USC Digital Library site. In addition to having seemed to have rendered all previous direct links to its photos void--I was able to fix two of the three in the link to post 6838 above--I find it incredibly cumbersome and slow. Not that I'm a computer graphics wiz, but zooming is available on any computer, and cropping is easy with any number of other programs. Also...the USC site seems to have more pages of old USC Trojan newspapers than pictures.... (Just my 2¢.)
+1 Very frustrating, especially when searching for what may have been once familiar images. Maybe things will improve as monitor resolutions improve. Definitely not smart phone friendly!
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  #11626  
Old Posted Jan 17, 2013, 6:17 PM
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GaylordWilshire GaylordWilshire is offline
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Originally Posted by BifRayRock View Post
Function of the divot in the street? Vent? Is the large building with the prominent fire escape the Pacific Telephone Exchange?

The bump may just be a lane marker; there were some of these around L.A. that had raised letters reading "STOP" facing the traffic flow, presumably from before electric signals. As for the Southern California Telephone Building at 666 S La Brea... I wondered why a brick building that didn't look all that old would have been replaced by a Deco-ish structure, but these article explain what happened... (note the error in directionals)...


LAT
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  #11627  
Old Posted Jan 17, 2013, 6:36 PM
tovangar2 tovangar2 is offline
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Colima Restaurant

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Originally Posted by MichaelRyerson View Post
Photograph of the exterior of an adobe built by Francisco Manza at 412 Sunset Boulevard, Los Angeles, ca.1925. The adobe, built in 1865, is pictured here from the side; a small brick kiln and a collection of other yard items stands with a small palm tree alongside the house.
Thank you MR. Excellent.

Here's a little overhead shot of the site taken from the top of the hill from an earlier post:

nopalera

http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...ostcount=10391

(BTW, re the quoted caption above, that's a yucca, not a small palm)
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  #11628  
Old Posted Jan 17, 2013, 7:03 PM
tovangar2 tovangar2 is offline
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Carthay Apartments Shops

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Originally Posted by GaylordWilshire View Post
Thank you GW and BRR for reminding me once again of the commercial development in front of the Carthay Building. When intact, the black glass facade was exceedingly norish and glamorous. So striking and evocative. It got inundated with signage and eventually stuccoed (I think not until the '90s)
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  #11629  
Old Posted Jan 17, 2013, 8:22 PM
malumot malumot is offline
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Looks like regular old pea gravel.

Makes a nice crunching noise underneath your tires.

Back in the days before every community became so anal about paving everything, pea gravel was widely used for parking lots, alleys, driveways - it was cheap and made an "all-weather" surface (i.e. it didn't turn to mud when it rained, and it mostly kept dust down).

When it starts wearing thin? - bring in a couple more truck loads!

Sadly such an effective and low-tech approach is not even considered anymore.


Quote:
Originally Posted by BifRayRock View Post
Time to gas up?



Undated ('20s?) and unknown location Interesting Pavement. Sawdust?
USC Digital


More interesting pavement, dirt?
USC Digital


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  #11630  
Old Posted Jan 17, 2013, 8:28 PM
BifRayRock BifRayRock is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GaylordWilshire View Post
The bump may just be a lane marker; there were some of these around L.A. that had raised letters reading "STOP" facing the traffic flow, presumably from before electric signals. As for the Southern California Telephone Building at 666 S La Brea... I wondered why a brick building that didn't look all that old would have been replaced by a Deco-ish structure, but these article explain what happened... (note the error in directionals)...


LAT
Interesting that the Phone Company planned for substantial expansion. Wonder if eventual construction resulted in lengthy service interruptions. Of course at that time there were relatively few customers in the area and complaints to a monopoly probably fell on deaf ears.

Telegram to Mayor Shaw: "What happened to my party line. Stop. Now have no dial tone! Stop"
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  #11631  
Old Posted Jan 17, 2013, 8:51 PM
tovangar2 tovangar2 is offline
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The crunch of gravel

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Originally Posted by malumot View Post
Looks like regular old pea gravel.

Makes a nice crunching noise underneath your tires.
Yes. Gasoline and sawdust isn't a combination I'd care to brave.

You brought this to mind:
"Rich the makes of motor whirring
Past the pine plantation purring
Come up Hupmobile, Delage
Short the way our chauffeurs travel
Crunching over private gravel,
Each from out his warm garage."

(John Betjamin - Indoor Games Near Newbury)

One doesn't see many Hupmobiles, or Delages for that matter, at the local gas station these days.
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  #11632  
Old Posted Jan 17, 2013, 9:21 PM
BifRayRock BifRayRock is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by malumot View Post
Looks like regular old pea gravel.

Makes a nice crunching noise underneath your tires.

Back in the days before every community became so anal about paving everything, pea gravel was widely used for parking lots, alleys, driveways - it was cheap and made an "all-weather" surface (i.e. it didn't turn to mud when it rained, and it mostly kept dust down).

When it starts wearing thin? - bring in a couple more truck loads!

Sadly such an effective and low-tech approach is not even considered anymore.
On my low-tech monitor the second photo looks more like lumpy beach sand!

I fondly remember the sound of gravel under my tires too. I recall a station owner who tried virtually everything short of paving to reduce constant spillage near his pumps. This included clay, gravel and some mixture of sticky wood shavings - all of which turned to muck when it rained. In retrospect the station probably had leaky storage tanks, bad plumbing or bad luck.

Unfortunately, low tech gravel has a few cons. It provides limited traction for drivers that tend to race to the pumps. And some of the station's windows and station attendant's teeth may suffer when cars leave the premises in a hurry looking for the real Don Steele's father.

Circa 1920 - More gravel at 618 South Figueroa St.
lapl


1938 - Santa Anita's Gravel-covered parking lot.
lapl

Undated and unknown gravel road
lapl


Last edited by BifRayRock; Jan 17, 2013 at 9:31 PM.
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  #11633  
Old Posted Jan 17, 2013, 9:26 PM
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GaylordWilshire GaylordWilshire is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by malumot View Post
Looks like regular old pea gravel.

Makes a nice crunching noise underneath your tires.

Back in the days before every community became so anal about paving everything, pea gravel was widely used for parking lots, alleys, driveways - it was cheap and made an "all-weather" surface (i.e. it didn't turn to mud when it rained, and it mostly kept dust down).

When it starts wearing thin? - bring in a couple more truck loads!

Sadly such an effective and low-tech approach is not even considered anymore.

Dear malumot... have you ever had a gravel driveway? They're a lot of work to keep neat and expensive to maintain & replenish. And a gas station would get hundreds if not thousands of times more use than a private driveway....
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  #11634  
Old Posted Jan 17, 2013, 9:44 PM
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FredH FredH is offline
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Brand New Parker Center - about 1955

Sorry about the lousy photo quality. I took these pictures of a printed poster with my cheap camera and zero photography skills.


Earl Witscher, Modernage Photo Service


Earl Witscher, Modernage Photo Service


If my dumb question allowance for the month has not been used up...what are these rows of markers up where the DWP building is now? Looks like a graveyard.


Earl Witscher, Modernage Photo Service
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  #11635  
Old Posted Jan 17, 2013, 9:45 PM
tovangar2 tovangar2 is offline
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Lots

The oddest surface I've ever seen was a parking lot on the old MGM studios lot, at the corner of Washington & Overland (later replaced by the Producers' Building where e_r worked).

It was oiled dirt. The lines marking each parking space were made of lengths of old fire hose spiked into the earth. Just weird.
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  #11636  
Old Posted Jan 17, 2013, 10:14 PM
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ethereal_reality ethereal_reality is offline
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A recent find on ebay.




Has anyone seen Washington Rock in Chatsworth? I wonder if it's still intact?
__

Last edited by ethereal_reality; Jan 18, 2013 at 12:47 AM.
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  #11637  
Old Posted Jan 17, 2013, 10:37 PM
tovangar2 tovangar2 is offline
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Originally Posted by BifRayRock View Post
Absolutely correct. Occasionally, one gets pleasantly lost in the minutiae and forgets that the E Clem Wilson building is a relative newcomer to the neighborhood (1930).
Yes. The E Clem Wilson wrapped itself around Stiles O Clements' beautiful little black and gold bank building which used to be the biggest building at the end of a little row of shops.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BifRayRock View Post


1928 (Are there any better posts of the building/cafe that preceded Tilford's (at left)?)
Lapl

I'd be interested to see that too. It's very reminiscent of a house here in my neighborhood (2357 Parnell) that I'm very fond of. I like the porthole windows in the tower of each:

gsv

Last edited by tovangar2; Jan 17, 2013 at 10:58 PM.
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  #11638  
Old Posted Jan 17, 2013, 10:58 PM
rbpjr rbpjr is offline
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I don't know about the rest of you folks but I am scrolling right past the "split" pictures...as has been said..."frustrating" to say the least...
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  #11639  
Old Posted Jan 17, 2013, 10:59 PM
BifRayRock BifRayRock is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tovangar2 View Post
Yes. The E Clem Wilson wrapped itself around Stiles O Clement's beautiful little black and gold bank building which used to be the biggest building at the end of a little row of shops.



I'd be interested to see that too. It's very reminiscent of a house here in my neighborhood (2357 Parnell) that I'm very fond of. I like the porthole windows in each tower:

gsv
In addition to GW's contributions:


google

Here: http://books.google.com/books?id=t8w...20Cafe&f=false


Dyas-Carleton Cafe Undated
USC Digital]






No shortage of nearby drug stores. Owl may have dominated its corner, but there were at least two others within a block's distance. Maybe more.





Last edited by BifRayRock; Jan 18, 2013 at 12:03 AM.
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  #11640  
Old Posted Jan 17, 2013, 11:05 PM
BifRayRock BifRayRock is offline
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Originally Posted by rbpjr View Post
I don't know about the rest of you folks but I am scrolling right past the "split" pictures...as has been said..."frustrating" to say the least...
I empathize with you. As noted before, you may have to try "zooming" in or out. Wish I had a better suggestion and I am hopeful that others have one. The alternative is posting much smaller images - that clearly have less content. It is equally frustrating trying to stitch together a higher resolution image.
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