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  #61  
Old Posted Apr 29, 2009, 9:58 PM
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i like how everyone feels the need to compare their (relatively sophisticated, though probably not enough to have taken nothing from these pictures) take on iran with that of the "average american," a sort of oafish, belligerent character that is [probably a guilty stand-in for the pre-informed self.
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  #62  
Old Posted May 4, 2009, 8:16 AM
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Awesome pictures!
- I did'nt know that they have so many high rises!
- Surprised to see a Corvette on one of the pics.
- Some really nice buildings.
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  #63  
Old Posted May 4, 2009, 6:13 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alasi View Post
If we had seen more photos like this on our news programs, more people might understand that we have a lot more in common with Iran than either the US or Iranian government has led us to believe.
(I'd say "occidental" governments )

Quote:
Originally Posted by bucks native View Post
...

Must women wear scarves and cover their legs?
Yes, but the scarves get smaller and smaller... (you can see their hair )

Really beautiful people, btw.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bucks native View Post
Any dress restrictions for men?
No.

Great thread, Terminator!!! Thanks for sharing!!
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  #64  
Old Posted May 4, 2009, 8:27 PM
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My dad is from Neyshabur, which is up in the NE mountains. Because of the political crap between the US and Iran, I've never even been able to visit. My cousin, who was born here and moved back a couple of years ago, grew up in Tehran. He doesn't have anything good to say about Iran, but I think the place is downright beautiful.

The only thing I can say about your photos is... Holy crap!!! I want to visit so bad, but I think that I'd be inclined to stay!

Thanks a lot for sharing these photos. I've looked at Tehran on Google Earth, but it obviously does not due the place justice like the photos you've posted.
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  #65  
Old Posted May 5, 2009, 4:19 AM
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i'm going to put this out there but it reminds me very much of colombia. Especially Bogota what with the mountains in the background and the lush green vegetation everywhere. your pics have amazed me. i never would have guessed iran to be such a beautiful country.
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  #66  
Old Posted May 7, 2009, 8:33 PM
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Amazing. It's a shame some Americans think Iran is just a desert, nothing more than Iraq. In fact, it's a culturally advanced civilization.
it's a shame that americans - all 300 million of us with backgrounds that span the entire globe - get lumped into stupid comments such as this. who says the proportion of americans who think iran is just desert is any higher or lower than say, canadians?

anyway.....really nice pics. don't know that i'd ever visit, but what i love about this forum is that you get to see so many interesting parts of the world that the media doesn't care to show you (for either political or marketing reasons).
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  #67  
Old Posted May 7, 2009, 10:41 PM
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Going there in July!
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  #68  
Old Posted May 7, 2009, 10:56 PM
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/\

Awesome, I'm planning to go there next year. However July really isn't the best time to visit as the temperatures will be quite extreme.

What cities are you going to visit? I'm planning to visit Tehran, Isfahan, Shiraz, Persepolis, Yazd, Kashan and probably 2 or 3 more smaller cities in between.
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  #69  
Old Posted May 7, 2009, 11:05 PM
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I'm going with my Iranian friend and my brother. We will first go through Dubai and then to his family in Tehran. Everything else is still out in the open.
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  #70  
Old Posted Jun 20, 2009, 7:49 PM
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  #71  
Old Posted Jun 21, 2009, 4:58 AM
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A Supreme Leader Loses His Aura as Iranians Flock to the Streets

A Supreme Leader Loses His Aura as Iranians Flock to the Streets

By ROGER COHEN
NY Times
6/21/09

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/06/21/op...ml?ref=opinion


TEHRAN — The Iranian police commander, in green uniform, walked up Komak Hospital Alley with arms raised and his small unit at his side. “I swear to God,” he shouted at the protesters facing him, “I have children, I have a wife, I don’t want to beat people. Please go home.”

A man at my side threw a rock at him. The commander, unflinching, continued to plead. There were chants of “Join us! Join us!” The unit retreated toward Revolution Street, where vast crowds eddied back and forth confronted by baton-wielding Basij militia and black-clad riot police officers on motorbikes.

Dark smoke billowed over this vast city in the late afternoon. Motorbikes were set on fire, sending bursts of bright flame skyward. Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, the supreme leader, had used his Friday sermon to declare high noon in Tehran, warning of “bloodshed and chaos” if protests over a disputed election persisted.

He got both on Saturday — and saw the hitherto sacrosanct authority of his office challenged as never before since the 1979 revolution birthed the Islamic Republic and conceived for it a leadership post standing at the very flank of the Prophet. A multitude of Iranians took their fight through a holy breach on Saturday from which there appears to be scant turning back.

Khamenei has taken a radical risk. He has factionalized himself, so losing the arbiter’s lofty garb, by aligning himself with President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad against both Mir Hussein Moussavi, the opposition leader, and Ali Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani, a founding father of the revolution.

He has taunted millions of Iranians by praising their unprecedented participation in an election many now view as a ballot-box putsch. He has ridiculed the notion that an official inquiry into the vote might yield a different result. He has tried pathos and he has tried pounding his lectern. In short, he has lost his aura.

The taboo-breaking response was unequivocal. It’s funny how people’s obsessions come back to bite them. I’ve been hearing about Khamenei’s fear of “velvet revolutions” for months now. There was nothing velvet about Saturday’s clashes. In fact, the initial quest to have Moussavi’s votes properly counted and Ahmadinejad unseated has shifted to a broader confrontation with the regime itself.

Garbage burned. Crowds bayed. Smoke from tear gas swirled. Hurled bricks sent phalanxes of police, some with automatic rifles, into retreat to the accompaniment of cheers. Early afternoon rumors that the rally for Moussavi had been canceled yielded to the reality of violent confrontation.

I don’t know where this uprising is leading. I do know some police units are wavering. That commander talking about his family was not alone. There were other policemen complaining about the unruly Basijis. Some security forces just stood and watched. “All together, all together, don’t be scared,” the crowd shouted.

I also know that Iran’s women stand in the vanguard. For days now, I’ve seen them urging less courageous men on. I’ve seen them get beaten and return to the fray. “Why are you sitting there?” one shouted at a couple of men perched on the sidewalk on Saturday. “Get up! Get up!”

Another green-eyed woman, Mahin, aged 52, staggered into an alley clutching her face and in tears. Then, against the urging of those around her, she limped back into the crowd moving west toward Freedom Square. Cries of “Death to the dictator!” and “We want liberty!” accompanied her.

There were people of all ages. I saw an old man on crutches, middle-aged office workers and bands of teenagers. Unlike the student revolts of 2003 and 1999, this movement is broad.

“Can’t the United Nations help us?” one woman asked me. I said I doubted that very much. “So,” she said, “we are on our own.”

The world is watching, and technology is connecting, and the West is sending what signals it can, but in the end that is true. Iranians have fought this lonely fight for a long time: to be free, to have a measure of democracy.

Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, the leader of the Islamic revolution, understood that, weaving a little plurality into an authoritarian system. That pluralism has ebbed and flowed since 1979 — mainly the former — but last week it was crushed with blunt brutality. That is why a whole new generation of Iranians, their intelligence insulted, has risen.

I’d say the momentum is with them for now. At moments on Saturday, Khamenei’s authority, which is that of the Islamic Republic itself, seemed fragile. The revolutionary authorities have always mocked the cancer-ridden Shah’s ceding before an uprising, and vowed never to bend in the same way. Their firepower remains formidable, but they are facing a swelling test.

Just off Revolution Street, I walked into a pall of tear gas. I’d lit a cigarette minutes before — not a habit but a need — and a young man collapsed into me shouting, “Blow smoke in my face.” Smoke dispels the effects of the gas to some degree.

I did what I could and he said, “We are with you” in English and with my colleague we tumbled into a dead end — Tehran is full of them — running from the searing gas and police. I gasped and fell through a door into an apartment building where somebody had lit a small fire in a dish to relieve the stinging.

There were about 20 of us gathered there, eyes running, hearts racing. A 19-year-old student was nursing his left leg, struck by a militiaman with an electric-shock-delivering baton. “No way we are turning back,” said a friend of his as he massaged that wounded leg.

Later, we moved north, tentatively, watching the police lash out from time to time, reaching Victory Square where a pitched battle was in progress. Young men were breaking bricks and stones to a size for hurling. Crowds gathered on overpasses, filming and cheering the protesters. A car burst into flames. Back and forth the crowd surged, confronted by less-than-convincing police units.

I looked up through the smoke and saw a poster of the stern visage of Khomeini above the words, “Islam is the religion of freedom.”

Later, as night fell over the tumultuous capital, gunfire could be heard in the distance. And from rooftops across the city, the defiant sound of “Allah-u-Akbar” — “God is Great” — went up yet again, as it has every night since the fraudulent election. But on Saturday it seemed stronger. The same cry was heard in 1979, only for one form of absolutism to yield to another. Iran has waited long enough to be free.
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  #72  
Old Posted Jun 21, 2009, 1:34 PM
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ROGER COHEN, well, there is an unbiased source.
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  #73  
Old Posted Jun 21, 2009, 6:16 PM
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Great pictures. Always good to see more of a place I don't get to see often. I am especially impressed with the winter time photos. They have a real stark beauty.
I can't resist one reply to those who have made disparaging comments about American ignorance of Iran. No matter how ignorant we are of Iran, it can't compare to Iranian Pres. Ahmadinejad's ignorance of his own country with the claim that Iran has no gay people.
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  #74  
Old Posted Jun 21, 2009, 6:19 PM
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Gorgeous views of that city, and the people are very attractive there. I am amazed at how it looks there. I pictured a hot desert climate like phoenix but Tehran has more of a NW United States look to it. I can imagine the people there are a great culture that is sheltered by a government that wants to hold the society back. I hope as things progress there, the people's voices are heard and they get the freedoms they wish for.
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  #75  
Old Posted Jun 30, 2009, 4:13 PM
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  #76  
Old Posted Jun 30, 2009, 4:26 PM
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  #77  
Old Posted Jul 18, 2009, 5:34 PM
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Last edited by Terminator; Jul 18, 2009 at 5:47 PM.
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  #78  
Old Posted Jul 18, 2009, 5:36 PM
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  #79  
Old Posted Jul 18, 2009, 7:29 PM
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Great photo thread. I can't believe it took me so long to discover it.

Living in Los Angeles I hear about Tehran and other parts of Iran all the time since I worked with so many people who are originally from Iran. I suppose another perk to living here especially seeing some of the strange comments on this thread.

Please keep posting.
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  #80  
Old Posted Jul 28, 2009, 12:09 AM
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Very awesome pics. The city looks amazing and the people are very nice. Thanks for sharing...

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