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  #5241  
Old Posted Jul 27, 2016, 1:18 PM
Novacek Novacek is offline
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Originally Posted by the Genral View Post
There is nothing that can be done to significantly solve the traffic issues on I35 through downtown.
It depends on what you mean by "nothing" and "solve".

In the long term, there will always be rush hour traffic on I35. Agree 100%. That's the case for every large city in the world.

The I35 work however has the potential to add congestion-free lanes for buses. So for some people, the "solution" may be to not participate in the traffic.

And in the short term, added capacity can still provide economic benefit. As well as benefits in the non-rush hour time periods (helping to keep non rush hour free flowing as the city continues to grow).


I'm taking no stance as to whether this is the best use of our money. But it's certainly not "nothing".
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  #5242  
Old Posted Jul 27, 2016, 2:32 PM
Dcbrickley Dcbrickley is offline
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".....the "solution" may be to not participate in the traffic. "

Novacek, with your permission, I plan to use this phrase forever! It's perfect.
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  #5243  
Old Posted Jul 27, 2016, 2:41 PM
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Originally Posted by Dcbrickley View Post
".....the "solution" may be to not participate in the traffic. "

Novacek, with your permission, I plan to use this phrase forever! It's perfect.
That's not a perfect solution. As long as there are people who wish to live in a different place from where they work there will be traffic. Even the most transit friendly cities in the world have heavy traffic and gridlock congestion.
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  #5244  
Old Posted Jul 27, 2016, 3:18 PM
Dcbrickley Dcbrickley is offline
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That's not a perfect solution. As long as there are people who wish to live in a different place from where they work there will be traffic. Even the most transit friendly cities in the world have heavy traffic and gridlock congestion.
I've never lived far from where I work, because I hate commuting and I hate the thought of contributing to global warming and pollution any more than I have to.

If you choose to live far from your work, cool. I feel ZERO responsibility to get you to work quickly/easily.
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  #5245  
Old Posted Jul 27, 2016, 3:24 PM
Novacek Novacek is offline
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Originally Posted by Dcbrickley View Post
".....the "solution" may be to not participate in the traffic. "

Novacek, with your permission, I plan to use this phrase forever! It's perfect.


That's basically my plan (slightly modified). When my own commute gets too bad, just switch over to my bike and stop playing the game (just waiting on a few more infrastructure projects, like the mopac bike lanes).
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  #5246  
Old Posted Jul 27, 2016, 3:26 PM
Novacek Novacek is offline
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Originally Posted by electricron View Post
Even the most transit friendly cities in the world have heavy traffic and gridlock congestion.
Right, but in a true transit friendly city, the two (can) become disconnected. NYC has horrible traffic, but that gridlock doesn't hurt the subway (probably it helps it, by increasing demand).
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  #5247  
Old Posted Jul 27, 2016, 6:10 PM
We vs us We vs us is offline
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Originally Posted by Dcbrickley View Post
I've never lived far from where I work, because I hate commuting and I hate the thought of contributing to global warming and pollution any more than I have to.

If you choose to live far from your work, cool. I feel ZERO responsibility to get you to work quickly/easily.

If you choose to live far from your work, cool. I feel ZERO responsibility to get you to work quickly/easily.[/QUOTE]

I didn't think it needed to be said, but maybe it does . . . living far from your work is rarely a choice people WANT to make. I can tell you straight up, the majority of the people who staff the hotel I work at downtown can't afford to live anywhere else but far out. But they don't have a choice if they want these jobs.

Good transit options -- including good highways and roads -- are crucial levers against inequality. If you're a Good Citizen -- and you strike me as that -- you might reconsider the "zero responsibility" thing.
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  #5248  
Old Posted Today, 3:42 AM
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SkyPie SkyPie is offline
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Austin's Commuter Rail Is A Monument To Government Waste
Scott Beyer, CONTRIBUTOR
Forbes
http://www.forbes.com/sites/scottbey.../#3448c0ee4310

Austin, TX–Last Saturday morning, while stumbling upon an Austin rail station, I was able to imagine at micro level what it must be like to visit one of China’s ghost cities. I was in Leander, an Austin suburb that has the northernmost stop on the metro area’s commuter rail system, when I spotted a multi-acre station plopped across what was essentially a rural area. After parking in the empty lot, I got out and walked around, to find a clean, well-landscaped facility that had not one human in sight. The info center was locked, the train platforms were empty, and no trains arrived. There was even a computerized voice humming out service updates over the platform speakers, to an absent audience. In fairness, the station was closed that day until 4pm. But that just begged the question—why would a train station be closed all Saturday morning and afternoon in a major metro area? Meanwhile, the platform offered an unobstructed view of adjacent US-183, where, in the course of 10 minutes, dozens of cars passed by in each direction.
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  #5249  
Old Posted Today, 4:43 AM
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Originally Posted by SkyPie View Post
Austin's Commuter Rail Is A Monument To Government Waste
Scott Beyer, CONTRIBUTOR
Forbes
http://www.forbes.com/sites/scottbey.../#3448c0ee4310

Austin, TX–Last Saturday morning, while stumbling upon an Austin rail station, I was able to imagine at micro level what it must be like to visit one of China’s ghost cities. I was in Leander, an Austin suburb that has the northernmost stop on the metro area’s commuter rail system, when I spotted a multi-acre station plopped across what was essentially a rural area. After parking in the empty lot, I got out and walked around, to find a clean, well-landscaped facility that had not one human in sight. The info center was locked, the train platforms were empty, and no trains arrived. There was even a computerized voice humming out service updates over the platform speakers, to an absent audience. In fairness, the station was closed that day until 4pm. But that just begged the question—why would a train station be closed all Saturday morning and afternoon in a major metro area? Meanwhile, the platform offered an unobstructed view of adjacent US-183, where, in the course of 10 minutes, dozens of cars passed by in each direction.
Hey, it's a commuter rail line. CapMetroRail isn't the only commuter rail operator in the states to have truncated operations on Saturday and Sunday.
List of Commuter Rail operators in the USA, and if they operate on Saturday and Sunday.

Sounder > No Saturday and No Sunday
ACE > No Saturday and No Sunday
CalTrain > Yes Saturday and No Sunday
Metrolink > Yes Saturday and Yes Sunday
Coaster > Yes Saturday and Yes Sunday
Sprinter > Yes Saturday and Yes Sunday
Frontrunner > Yes Saturday and No Sunday
Railrunner > Yes Saturday and No Sunday
TRE > Yes Saturday and No Sunday
CapMetro > Yes Saturday and No Sunday
Northstar > Yes Saturday and No Sunday
Metra > Yes Saturday and No Sunday
Music City > No Saturday and No Sunday

Well, that covers the Central, Mountain, and Pacific time zones. I don't think listing the Eastern Time Zones will change my point, even if they all ran on Saturday and Sunday - which by the way they don't.
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