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  #361  
Old Posted Oct 3, 2014, 11:32 AM
New Brisavoine New Brisavoine is offline
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The German statistical office has also published the country's detailed population figures as of Jan. 1, 2014.

On January 1, 2014, the population of Germany was 80,767,463. The population of Germany grew by +243,800 people (+0.30%) in 2013, thanks to very high immigration. Super low fertility means the population is aging fast though.

Population less than 20 y/o on Jan. 1, 2014:
- France: 16,192,070 (French citizens: 15,398,658)
- UK: 15,192,650 (on July 1, 2013)
- Germany: 14,636,440 (German citizens: 13,664,669)
- Italy: 11,310,660 (Italian citizens: 10,124,273)
- Spain: 9,206,815 (Spanish citizens: 8,288,936)

Women between the ages of 20 and 40:
- Germany: 10,031,348 (German citizens: 8,570,577)
- UK: 8,904,939 (on July 1, 2013)
- France: 8,526,880 (French citizens: 7,808,914)
- Italy: 7,685,833 (Italian citizens: 6,586,273)
- Spain: 6,603,937 (Spanish citizens: 5,543,508)

We can see that France, despite having less women between the ages of 20 and 40 than Germany and the UK, manages to have more births than these two countries. The comparison between the population under 20 y/o of Italy and the UK is also pretty enlightening.
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  #362  
Old Posted Oct 5, 2014, 8:05 PM
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Germany is getting crazy high immigration right now.

But this is a temporary stopgap. There won't always be such a large economic gap between European neighbors, nor will there always be the political environment for open immigration.

Germany needs a higher birthrate or it will shrink, as it already does in years without ridiculous immigration numbers.
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  #363  
Old Posted Oct 17, 2014, 10:22 AM
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Exodus Campaign From Israel to Berlin, Germany
New York Times

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Israelis have for years been drawn to Berlin’s cosmopolitan flair, vibrant arts scene and advanced public transportation. There are already several places in the city where one can have authentic hummus, and there is a bimonthly Hebrew-language magazine. But a Facebook post that went viral this month, a photograph of a supermarket receipt showcasing the low price in Berlin of a beloved chocolate-pudding snack, has revived a raw debate over the meaning of out-migration.
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  #364  
Old Posted Oct 23, 2014, 2:28 PM
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Push for Israelis to move to Berlin causes an uproar
USA Today


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The Move to Berlin initiative is not entirely new. The Israeli embassy in Germany estimated more than 15,000 Israelis have arrived in Berlin since 2011, after the "Rothschild Boulevard" protests in Tel Aviv that coincided with the Occupy Movement in the United States, along with the Arab Spring demonstrations in this region.

In Tel Aviv then, protesters occupied tony Rothschild Boulevard for three months in a demonstration initially sparked by the high price of cottage cheese in local groceries. Berlin these days is dotted with Israeli start-ups. A street in the Kreuzberg district is informally called "Little Tel Aviv" because so many Israelis live there.
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  #365  
Old Posted Oct 24, 2014, 3:30 PM
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INSEE has just published the detailed results of the 2011 French census by countries and territories of birth. Here are the figures for the Paris Region (Île-de-France).

At the January 2011 census, the number of people living in the Paris Region who were born outside of Metropolitan France (the European part of France) was 2,739,825. Their number rose from 2,558,770 at the January 2006 census. The growth of the non-Metropolitan France born population was thus +181,055 in 5 years. Note that the growth of the non-Metropolitan France born population is the result of [arrivals] minus [departures and deaths]. Births on French territory do no enter into this equation.

Between Jan. 2006 and Jan. 2011, the total population of the Paris Region grew by 323,257 people. The non-Metropolitan France born people where thus responsible for 56% of the Paris Region's growth during those 5 years, not even including the births they had in the Paris Region during those 5 years.

The percentage of inhabitants of the Paris Region who were born outside of Metropolitan France was 23.1% at the 2011 census, up from 22.2% at the 2006 census.

Here is the population growth for each group of immigrants/migrants (people from Overseas France are migrants, but not legally immigrants) between 2009 and 2011 (INSEE started publishing detailed figures only from the 2009 census onwards). INSEE unfortunately didn't publish the detail for all the countries of the world, so I'm making the best groupings I can with what was published.

Again, keep in mind that births on French soil are not included in those figures. A person born on French soil is not an immigrant or a migrant.

Absolute population growth of the immigrant/migrant groups in the Paris Region between 2009 and 2011:
- born in Africa (including Réunion and Mayotte) outside of the Maghreb: +11,950 per year
- born in the Maghreb: +6,790 per year
- born in Asia outside of Turkey, Lebanon, India, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka: +4,719 per year
- born in India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka: +2,512 per year
- born in Europe outside of the EU 27: +1,771 per year
- born in Spanish-speaking and Portuguese-speaking Latin America: +1,307 per year
- born in the French West Indies (Haiti, Guadeloupe, Martinique) and French Guiana: +1,301 per year
- born in the UE 27 (except France): +1,137 per year
- born in Turkey: +875 per year
- born in North America (USA, Canada): +203 per year
- born in Oceania (including the French Pacific territories): +125 per year
- born in Lebanon: -196 per year

Relative population growth of the immigrant/migrant groups in the Paris Region between 2009 and 2011:
- born in India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka: +3.62% per year
- born in Africa (including Réunion and Mayotte) outside of the Maghreb: +2.73% per year
- born in Europe outside of the EU 27: +2.54% per year
- born in Spanish-speaking and Portuguese-speaking Latin America: +2.49% per year
- born in Asia outside of Turkey, Lebanon, India, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka: +2.20% per year
- born in Oceania (including the French Pacific territories): +1.75% per year
ALL IMMIGRANTS/MIGRANTS IN THE PARIS REGION: +1.43% per year
- born in Turkey: +1.30% per year
- born in the Maghreb: +1.12% per year
- born in North America (USA, Canada): +0.88% per year
- born in the French West Indies (Haiti, Guadeloupe, Martinique) and French Guiana: +0.66% per year
- born in the UE 27 (except France): +0.22% per year
- born in Lebanon: -0.97% per year

Here are the countries/territories with the biggest increases and decreases.

Absolute population growth of the immigrant/migrant groups in the Paris Region between 2009 and 2011, per country/territory of origin:
- born in Romania: +3,578 per year
- born in Algeria: +3,062 per year
- born in China: +2,155 per year
- born in the Congo-Kinshasa: +2,106 per year
- born in Tunisia: +2,053 per year
- born in Morocco: +1,675 per year
- born in Mayotte: +1,521 per year
- born in Sri Lanka: +1,486 per year
- born in Côte d'Ivoire: +1,312 per year
- born in Cameroon: +1,255 per year
...
...
- born in Martinique: -167 per year
- born in Mauritius: -171 per year
- born in Switzerland: -179 per year
- born in Lebanon: -196 per year
- born in Serbia: -383 per year
- born in Germany: -624 per year
- born in Spain: -644 per year
- born in Italy: -703 per year
- born in Portugal: -1,203 per year

Relative population growth of the immigrant/migrant groups in the Paris Region between 2009 and 2011, for the countries/territories with at least 10,000 natives living in the Paris Region:
- born in Romania: +11.91% per year
- born in Russia: +6.05% per year
- born in the Congo-Kinshasa: +5.50% per year
- born in Brazil: +5.19% per year
- born in Sri Lanka: +4.58% per year
- born in the Comoros: +3.89% per year
- born in China: +3.81% per year
- born in Mauritania: +3.67% per year
- born in Cameroon: +3.62% per year
- born in Pakistan: +3.46% per year
- born in Guinea-Conakry: +3.11% per year
- born in Côte d'Ivoire: +2.99% per year
...
...
- born in Portugal: -0.50% per year
- born in Belgium: -0.80% per year
- born in Mauritius: -0,86% per year
- born in Lebanon: -0,97% per year
- born in Italy: -1,24% per year
- born in Spain: -1,36% per year
- born in Serbia: -1,37% per year
- born in Germany: -2,57% per year
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  #366  
Old Posted Nov 25, 2014, 9:24 PM
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Now that INSEE has finally published the results of the 2011 French census by place of birth, I've made this map showing the foreign-born population of France, the UK, and Spain at the 2011 censuses. Unfortunately these 3 countries are the only EU countries that I know of which have published their 2011 census figures by place of birth. In particular, neither Italy nor Germany have published their 2011 census figures by place of birth.

The map shows the share of foreign-born population in each department of France, UK county/local authority, and Spanish province. For England, I've used the ceremonial counties, whose size is more similar to the French departments and the Spanish provinces. Some very interesting regional patterns are visible on the map.

"Foreign-born" has different meanings in each country, so I've used the most homogeneous definition possible. In the UK, a foreign-born person is someone born outside of the UK (that includes the people born in the British Overseas Territories and the Channel Islands/Isle of Man, because these are not part of the UK). In Metropolitan France a foreign-born person is someone born outside of Metropolitan France (the European territory of France). That includes the people born in Overseas France now living in Metropolitan France, as well as the Pieds-Noirs from North Africa (the UK figures also include the British citizens from former Rhodesia, South Africa, etc.). In Spain, a foreign-born person is someone born outside of the current borders of Spain (so that includes for example the Spanish citizens born in the former Spanish Morocco).



The counties/departments/provinces/islands with the highest and lowest shares of foreign-born population at the 2011 census:
- Inner London: 42.2% (i.e. 42.2% of the inhabitants of Inner London at the 2011 census were born outside of the UK)
- Seine-Saint-Denis: 33.8% (i.e. 33.8% of the inhabitants of Seine-Saint-Denis at the 2011 census were born outside of Metropolitan France)
- Fuerteventura Island: 33.7% (i.e. 33.7% of the inhabitants of Fuerteventura at the 2011 census were born outside of Spain)
- Outer London: 33.1%
- Lanzarote Island: 28.7%
- Ibiza & Formentera Islands: 28.5%
- City of Paris: 26.1%
- Val-de-Marne: 25.3%

- Melilla: 23.5%
- El Hierro Island: 23.4%
- Majorca Island: 22.8%
- Val-d'Oise: 22.6%
- Alicante Province: 22.5%
- Alpes-Maritimes: 22.5%
- Hauts-de-Seine: 22.1%

- Girona Province: 21.2%
- Almeria Province: 20.6%
- Tenerife Island: 19.4%
- Berkshire: 19.3%
- Gomera Island: 19.0%
- Essonne: 18.8%
- Minorca Island: 18.5%
- Madrid Province: 18.4%
- Tarragona Province: 18.3%
- Malaga Province: 18.3%
- Lerida Province: 18.1%
- Bouches-du-Rhône: 18.1%
- Bedfordshire: 18.0%
- Castellon Province: 17.2%
- Guadalajara Province: 16.9%
- Pyrénées-Orientales: 16.8%
- Yvelines: 16.7%

- West Midlands County (Greater Birmingham): 16.6%
- La Palma Island: 16.4%
- Barcelona Province: 16.3%
- Murcia Province: 16.3%

- Seine-et-Marne: 16.2%
- Leicestershire: 16.1%
- Hérault: 16.1%
...
...
...
SPAIN: 13.5%
UK: 12.7%
METROPOLITAN FRANCE: 12.2%
...
...
...
- Jaén Province: 3.9%
- Mayenne 3.9%
- Cordova Province: 3.8%
- Cumbria: 3.7%
- Falkirk: 3.6%
- County Durham: 3.6%
- Dumfries & Galloway: 3.5%
- Vendée: 3.5%
- Isle of Anglesey: 3.5%
- South Ayrshire: 3.4%
- South Lanarkshire: 3.4%
- Orkney Islands: 3.4%
- West Dunbartonshire: 3.1%
- Manche: 3.0%
- North Lanarkshire: 3.0%
- Outer Hebrides: 2.9%
- Northumberland: 2.8%
- Pas-de-Calais: 2.8%
- Cantal: 2.8%

- Inverclyde: 2.6%
- North Ayrshire: 2.5%
- East Ayrshire: 2.3%
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  #367  
Old Posted Nov 28, 2014, 7:28 PM
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Why does Mediterranean France have a higher rate of foreign-born than France as a whole? Is it the tourism industry centered around the French Riveria? Or just because of proximity to the Maghreb?
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  #368  
Old Posted Dec 9, 2014, 8:13 PM
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Eurostat has published the results of the 2011 censuses for all the EEA countries + Switzerland in a so-called 'Census Hub'. Among the treasure trove of data to be found there, we have finally access to the census results by place of birth for all the countries of the EEA + Switzerland, which were hitherto inaccessible for many countries (for example Belgium, Italy, Germany).

There is material in there for many posts, but to start somewhere, I'll start with this: where the European people live in Europe.

All figures come from the Europe-wide 2011 censuses. Very unfortunately, The Netherlands have not reported to Eurostat their census results by countries of birth, so no data for The Netherlands here below.

Where did the people born in France live in Europe in 2011:
- France: 57,606,286 (this figure of course doesn't include the 1 million Pieds-Noirs born in North Africa who now live in France, 630,000 of them from Algeria, 240,000 from Morocco, and 130,000 from Tunisia, such as the former mayor of Paris Bertrand Delanoë, as well as tens of thousands of other White French people born in the former colonies and protectorates and now living in France)
- Spain: 199,350 (i.e. 199,350 people born in France lived in Spain in 2011)
- Belgium: 175,029
- UK: 139,420
- Italy: 127,428
- Switzerland: 122,170
- Germany: 109,260
- Portugal: 94,484
- Luxembourg: 28,085
- Poland: 26,705
- Éire: 10,103

So much for the myth gleefully propagated by the English media of the UK being the #1 country of destination for the emigrating French people!

Where did the people born in the UK live in Europe in 2011:
- UK: 55,188,700 (this figure does not include the tens of thousands of White British people born in the former colonies and protectorates who now live in the UK)
- Spain: 296,220
- Éire: 287,600
- France: 169,945
- Germany: 80,290
- Italy: 58,309
- Switzerland: 35,492
- Cyprus: 31,495
- Belgium: 23,628
- Sweden: 21,914
- Portugal: 19,131
- Greece: 18,294
- Poland: 18,209
- Norway: 18,016
- Denmark: 16,582
- Malta: 10,484

More UK-born people live in France than the number of France-born people living in the UK. Pretty interesting finding!

Where did the people born in Éire live in Europe in 2011:
- Éire: 3,758,511
- England: 395,182 (170,560 of them in the London LUZ)
- Northern Ireland: 37,872
- Scotland: 22,952
- Spain: 13,105
- Wales: 12,175
- France: 9,393
- Germany: 9,380

Where did the people born in Germany live in Europe in 2011:
- Germany: 65,757,600 (this figure does not include slightly more than 2 million German people born in the German Reich east of the Oder-Neisse line in what is today Poland and who appear as Poland-born people in the census figures; see "where did the people born in Poland live in Europe in 2011" below) (this figure also of course does not include the 400,000 ethnic Germans from the Sudetenland who now live in Germany, and the hundreds of thousands of ethnic Germans from Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union also living in Germany)
- Switzerland: 304,815
- UK: 299,745 (this includes many children of British soldiers stationed in Germany)
- France: 219,966 (this includes the children of French soldiers stationed in Germany, but much less than is the case in the UK)
- Italy: 209,347
- Austria: 199,686
- Spain: 195,250
- Greece: 118,316
- Belgium: 84,223
- Poland: 76,178
- Sweden: 47,852
- Croatia: 34,148
- Denmark: 34,096
- Portugal: 28,000
- Norway: 27,238
- Hungary: 22,605
- Czech Republic: 16,717
- Luxembourg: 14,803
- Éire: 12,980

Where did the people born in the Netherlands live in Europe in 2011:
- The Netherlands: 14,787,144
- Belgium: 126,354
- Germany: 112,360
- UK: 63,715
- France: 40,616
- Spain: 35,210
- Switzerland: 20,692
- Italy: 11,694

Where did the people born in Italy live in Europe in 2011:
- Italy: 54,630,177
- France: 345,038
- Germany: 330,730
- Switzerland: 229,112
- UK: 141,205
- Belgium: 120,194
- Spain: 81,200
- Austria: 25,400
- Romania: 21,424
- Luxembourg: 13,223

Where did the people born in Spain live in Europe in 2011:
- Spain: 41,153,550
- France: 288,168 (the mayor of Paris among them!)
- UK: 84,820
- Germany: 75,670
- Switzerland: 51,723
- Belgium: 38,794
- Italy: 24,937
- Portugal: 16,489
- Romania: 15,541

Where did the people born in Portugal live in Europe in 2011:
- Portugal: 9,690,365 (this figure does not include the more than 200,000 White Portuguese born in the former colonies in Africa and who now live in Portugal)
- France: 617,235
- Switzerland: 169,458
- Spain: 98,975
- UK: 92,065
- Germany: 75,110
- Luxembourg: 60,897
- Belgium: 28,310
- Italy: 5,241

It's just fascinating how the Portuguese and above all the Spaniards don't like to live in each other's countries!

Where did the people born in Greece live in Europe in 2011:
- Greece: 9,530,219
- Germany: 160,390
- UK: 36,935
- Cyprus: 18,788
- Italy: 14,756
- Belgium: 14,348
- France: 12,363
- Sweden: 12,060

Where did the people born in Albania live in Europe in 2011:
- Greece: 452,553 (62,371 of whom were Greek citizens, many of them ethnic Greeks born in Albania)
- Italy: 396,540
- Germany: 14,490
- UK: 13,665
- Belgium: 7,574
- France: 6,905

Where did the people born in the countries of the former Yugoslavia live in Europe in 2011:
- Germany: 767,680
- Austria: 387,989
- Italy: 257,524
- Switzerland: 238,912
- France: 106,275
- Sweden: 78,696
- UK: 63,730
- Belgium: 55,109
- Hungary: 34,553
- Denmark: 33,095
- Norway: 30,810
- Spain: 11,015
- Luxembourg: 10,759

Where did the people born in Romania live in Europe in 2011:
- Romania: 19,971,077
- Italy: 768,634
- Spain: 690,505
- Germany: 449,920 (356,210 of whom were German citizens, most of them ethnic Germans born in Romania)
- Hungary: 176,550 (139,093 of whom were Hungarian citizens, most of them ethnic Hungarians born in Romania)
- UK: 83,170
- France: 71,751
- Austria: 68,531
- Greece: 47,799
- Belgium: 37,730
- Cyprus: 24,532
- Portugal: 23,689
- Sweden: 21,007
- Éire: 17,995
- Czech Republic: 12,767
- Switzerland: 12,265

Where did the people born in Poland live in Europe in 2011:
- Poland: 37,386,860 (this figure does not include the more than 300,000 Polish people born in the Polish Republic east of the Curzon Line in what is today Ukraine, Belarus, and Lithuania and who now live in Poland)
- Germany: 2,749,670 (2,439,530 of whom were German citizens, most of them ethnic Germans born in the German Reich east of the Oder-Neisse line)
- UK: 654,010
- Éire: 115,193
- France: 102,740
- Italy: 97,521 (this figure may include some German retirees who were born east of the Oder-Neisse line in what is today Poland)
- Sweden: 72,955
- Norway: 66,811
- Austria: 60,119
- Belgium: 57,689
- Spain: 52,135 (this figure may include some German retirees who were born east of the Oder-Neisse line in what is today Poland)
- Denmark: 26,938
- Czech Republic: 25,980
- Switzerland: 21,044
- Greece: 16,208 (this figure may include some German retirees who were born east of the Oder-Neisse line in what is today Poland)
- Iceland: 8,800

Where did the people born in Russia live in Europe in 2011:
- Germany: 975,500 (817,220 of whom were German citizens, most of them ethnic Germans born in Russia; there were also 223,420 people born in the "Soviet Union", without more detail, who lived in Germany in 2011, 211,660 of whom were German citizens)
- Latvia: 158,975
- Estonia: 140,181
- Lithuania: 80,471
- Greece: 56,075
- Italy: 55,855
- France: 52,462
- Spain: 52,440
- Belgium: 7,006 people born in Russia, and 51,094 people born in the "Soviet Union" (without more detail)
- Poland: 42,313
- UK: 39,530
- Czech Republic: 35,742
- Austria: 26,882
- Bulgaria: 18,725
- Sweden: 16,428
- Norway: 15,202
- Switzerland: 13,190

Despite all the talk about "Londongrad", the UK is a rather minor country of destination for the Russian emigrants, even in Western Europe.

Where did the people born in Ukraine live in Europe in 2011:
- Poland: 233,123 (215,243 of whom were Polish citizens, most of them ethnic Poles born in the Polish Republic east of the Curzon Line in what is today Ukraine)
- Germany: 205,970 (107,020 of whom were German citizens, many of them ethnic Germans born in Ukraine)
- Italy: 180,920
- Czech Republic: 137,992
- Spain: 74,095
- Latvia: 38,435
- Hungary: 35,354
- Portugal: 33,172
- UK: 21,785
- Estonia: 21,156
- Greece: 20,133
- Lithuania: 16,648
- France: 16,274
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  #369  
Old Posted Dec 9, 2014, 9:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by New Brisavoine View Post
Where did the people born in Spain live in Europe in 2011:
...
- France: 288,168 (the mayor of Paris among them!)
...
..and the prime minister.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Crawford View Post
Why does Mediterranean France have a higher rate of foreign-born than France as a whole? Is it the tourism industry centered around the French Riveria? Or just because of proximity to the Maghreb?
The proximity of the Maghreb and Southern Europe from where come a large part of the immigration in France.
After the second WW2 it was a booming region with a lot of new industries unlike Northern France which was in decline.
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  #370  
Old Posted Dec 10, 2014, 1:17 PM
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Mouais... A super quick search on Wikipedia is enough to show that both Hidalgo and Valls were born to strongly politicized families anyway. And really, it's not too hard for the Spaniards to enjoy upward social mobility when they're deserving, they're not affected by racism. The main concern goes to the French with some African ancestries. You don't see many of them in the political staff yet, while some have been hard workers and deserving to be influential. That's a major concern to our general interests and still an evidence of shameful racism.

From a French perspective, I think those figures just keep testifying of the traditional and cultural Latin proximity between the old Roman Catholic nations sharing coastal regions to the Mediterranean sea. Claiming to be Spanish, Italian or Portuguese is nothing much exotic in France. Millions of us have that kind of backgrounds.
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  #371  
Old Posted Dec 10, 2014, 7:28 PM
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There's no way to accurately track where EU citizens live, especially not for shorter periods of time. If I live in Barcelona for 6 months a year and in the Netherlands for the other 6, noone would be the wiser.
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  #372  
Old Posted Dec 10, 2014, 10:05 PM
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Originally Posted by SHiRO View Post
There's no way to accurately track where EU citizens live, especially not for shorter periods of time. If I live in Barcelona for 6 months a year and in the Netherlands for the other 6, noone would be the wiser.
Big Brother is always watching you.
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  #373  
Old Posted Dec 10, 2014, 10:21 PM
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^ So long as you use some connected computers as tiny as smartphones, which most on Earth do today, it surely is. Except for something ignoring money, trust should always be relative.
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  #374  
Old Posted Dec 11, 2014, 12:03 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SHiRO View Post
There's no way to accurately track where EU citizens live, especially not for shorter periods of time. If I live in Barcelona for 6 months a year and in the Netherlands for the other 6, noone would be the wiser.
You need to live for more than 6 months in a country to be considered resident of that country. Only the people living for more than 6 months in the country are listed in my figures.

And as for tracking people, the census does track people. That's the purpose of a census, otherwise we wouldn't spend hundreds of millions of euros to run censuses.
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  #375  
Old Posted Dec 11, 2014, 1:40 PM
Crawford Crawford is offline
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Don't most European states require address registration? At least in Germany, it's illegal to reside at any address without registering with the locality.

In theory, legal migration should be very easily trackable (though I have no idea whether the data is public).
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  #376  
Old Posted Dec 14, 2014, 12:20 PM
Miu Miu is offline
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So, based on above figures, these are the 2011 foreign-born populations (in the strictest sense of the word) for the main European immigration destinations:

Germany 14.5 Million (18.1%)
UK 7.8 Million (12.4%)
France 7.4 Million (11.3%)
Spain 5.5 Million (11.8%)
Italy 4.7 Million (7.8%)
Netherlands 1.9 Million (11.2%)
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  #377  
Old Posted Dec 14, 2014, 12:25 PM
Miu Miu is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Crawford View Post
Don't most European states require address registration? At least in Germany, it's illegal to reside at any address without registering with the locality.

In theory, legal migration should be very easily trackable (though I have no idea whether the data is public).
In theory perhaps. Many people don't actually ever register where they live and, more importantly, don't unregister when they leave, though.
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  #378  
Old Posted Dec 21, 2014, 12:31 AM
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JManc JManc is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Crawford View Post
Don't most European states require address registration? At least in Germany, it's illegal to reside at any address without registering with the locality.
Wow, that's pretty scary. Is it for registering to vote, taxes, drivers licenses/ ID purposes?
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