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  #101  
Old Posted Oct 17, 2019, 4:21 PM
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Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
I mentioned in my initial posts that the Mother Country relationship (if it indeed exists) may not necessarily come about in the traditional way - even though there is some evidence that some elements were nonetheless in play.

Most people have not taken my caveat into account in their responses.

But there is definitely something there and the way Canadians focus on and mimic so many things about the U.S. is arguably reminiscent of relationships with a Mother Country as observed around the world.

Regardless of what the genesis of that relationship was.
More like a big brother country or the rich cousin of “Our American Cousin” than a parent, though.
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  #102  
Old Posted Oct 17, 2019, 4:25 PM
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Dick Stacey's Country Jamboree! I remember it well. (I spent part of my childhood and youth in the Maritimes, you'll recall.)

Some of the show's main sponsors were from Atlantic Canada even though the show was produced in Maine.


Everybody in the Maritimes watched Dick Stacey's Country Jamboree (or had to because their parents watched it)!

"See these hands? They smell like gas..." lol
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  #103  
Old Posted Oct 17, 2019, 4:31 PM
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Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Same here. "I'm just a bill yes I'm only a bill, and I'm sitting' here on Capitol Hill..." and "The Great American Melting Pot"...

When I look at some of my old friends' activity on social media, and how irate they can get about Trump and other U.S. issues, I wonder if the fact that we grew up with all this stuff so ubiquitous in our lives didn't subliminally convince a lot of people that U.S. issues are happening on "home turf".
Yes, it's very strange. I'll admit to sometimes feeling that I have a personal stake in what is happening south of the border. Though, I suppose we do as Canada is so affected by conditions in the US... if they tank, we will likely get sucked down the drain with them...

It's tricky to resolve sometimes, as growing up it definitely felt to me, subliminally, that we were actually part of the USA even though I knew intellectually that we are not. It was only as I went through adulthood and my experiences expanded that I realized how different we actually are, in so many ways, and grew to appreciate the nuances of those differences.

Great discussion!
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  #104  
Old Posted Oct 17, 2019, 4:45 PM
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^ I suspect that with the common language it's easier to absorb large amounts of news and information from the US. Imagine if the US was the same in every respect, except they spoke Spanish. Faced with a linguistic divide, there would be a lot more distance... the flow of imported culture and entertainment would decline dramatically, and we'd probably import a lot more from the UK, Australia, Ireland and other English-speaking countries instead of relying almost exclusively on the US.
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  #105  
Old Posted Oct 17, 2019, 4:46 PM
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Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
For those who know Quebec a bit, "what the US might look like had it been French" is a fairly common view.
Well, personally, I view (English) Canada as being what the US would have looked like if the revolution had not occurred.
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  #106  
Old Posted Oct 17, 2019, 5:04 PM
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Originally Posted by Bcasey25raptor View Post
except they don't, there is a deal of assimilation yes but for the most part someones roots stick with them and greatly colour the way they see the world.

as for latino and black influences? In the us they are HUGE influences. The uS has far more cultural influences from black and latino cultures than Canada does which skews the US quite a degree differently. In contrast first nations peoples and cultures are far more dominant here in Canada.

as for Vancouver being cascadia? I don't see it, other than the environment of the area, BC is quite a degree different from washington state. Vancouver is demographically vastly different from seattle due to the huge influence of asian populations here that are lacking in seattle.

BC is also more conservative than washington state is and in BC urbanization and urban planning is far more influences by asia then seattle is.

The uS side of the pacific northwest does have a lot of similarities with us but it's way overaggerated mainly by a subsect of young white people that either used to believe in the cascadia movement or still do.

I notice a difference between BC and washington even when only visiting bellingham.

In General Canada is a more conservative and reserved country then the united states is.
Learned a lot today about Canada I had no idea that Vancouver was such an ordinary and typical Canadian city.

All this time I thought of the average Canadian city being like Saskatoon.
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  #107  
Old Posted Oct 17, 2019, 5:13 PM
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Originally Posted by esquire View Post
^ I suspect that with the common language it's easier to absorb large amounts of news and information from the US. Imagine if the US was the same in every respect, except they spoke Spanish. Faced with a linguistic divide, there would be a lot more distance... the flow of imported culture and entertainment would decline dramatically, and we'd probably import a lot more from the UK, Australia, Ireland and other English-speaking countries instead of relying almost exclusively on the US.
How much difference would you expect to be between the two countries if we had a 1 kilometer high wall dividing us since 1900.

We might have a bit of a scottish accent but most of what is Canadian is a result of having a blank slate.

A whole lot of American culture can be summed up as English folk free of the oppressive upper class. There's a reason that Irish Americans/Southerners seem so typical of the American identity.

The industrial revolution hid a whole lot of the rural english country side but it is still the heart of anglo-american culture.
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  #108  
Old Posted Oct 17, 2019, 5:18 PM
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Originally Posted by LakeLocker View Post
Learned a lot today about Canada I had no idea that Vancouver was such an ordinary and typical Canadian city.

All this time I thought of the average Canadian city being like Saskatoon.
What does average have to do with it? This person tried to claim BC was identical to Washington state when it just isn’t.

Why do you desire so much to deny any of Canada’s uniqueness. We aren’t just “more America”. There’s a lot of differences at play.

As for average city?
The Toronto region the Golden Horseshoe has 9 million people, greater Vancouver-power mainland has 3 million, Calgary 1.5 million, Edmonton 1.4 million.

All 4 of those cities are very ethnically diverse and quite different from their American counterparts.

Like I’ve seen people try and claim Toronto is a Canadian Chicago which is absurd. The 2 cities are completely different in terms of politics, demographics, food cultures, built form, and histories.

The only thing they have in common is being a large city on the Great Lakes.

Don’t sell Canada short. I used to do that, I’ve learned better now that I have more experience.
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  #109  
Old Posted Oct 17, 2019, 5:19 PM
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Originally Posted by MonctonRad View Post
Well, personally, I view (English) Canada as being what the US would have looked like if the revolution had not occurred.
I've long thought that as well.
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  #110  
Old Posted Oct 17, 2019, 5:21 PM
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Originally Posted by OldDartmouthMark View Post

It's tricky to resolve sometimes, as growing up it definitely felt to me, subliminally, that we were actually part of the USA even though I knew intellectually that we are not. It was only as I went through adulthood and my experiences expanded that I realized how different we actually are, in so many ways, and grew to appreciate the nuances of those differences.

!
That last paragraph mirrors my experience almost perfectly.
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  #111  
Old Posted Oct 17, 2019, 5:29 PM
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Originally Posted by LakeLocker View Post
Learned a lot today about Canada I had no idea that Vancouver was such an ordinary and typical Canadian city.

All this time I thought of the average Canadian city being like Saskatoon.
The "average" Anglo-Canadian city is Peterborough. Its well known for this trait: its a very common place for marketers to test new brands and such.
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  #112  
Old Posted Oct 17, 2019, 5:37 PM
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The "average" Anglo-Canadian city is Peterborough. Its well known for this trait: its a very common place for marketers to test new brands and such.
Nah, Moncton is the quintessential Canadian city:

- 2/3rds anglophone, 1/3rd francophone
- officially bilingual (both municipally and provincially)
- lot's of snow
- hockey mad
- there are 35 Tim Horton's outlets in the metropolitan area.
- municipal police force is the RCMP
- the city even owns it's own sugar bush and produces it's own maple syrup!
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  #113  
Old Posted Oct 17, 2019, 5:53 PM
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Originally Posted by Bcasey25raptor View Post
What does average have to do with it? This person tried to claim BC was identical to Washington state when it just isn’t.

Why do you desire so much to deny any of Canada’s uniqueness. We aren’t just “more America”. There’s a lot of differences at play.

As for average city?
The Toronto region the Golden Horseshoe has 9 million people, greater Vancouver-power mainland has 3 million, Calgary 1.5 million, Edmonton 1.4 million.

All 4 of those cities are very ethnically diverse and quite different from their American counterparts.

Like I’ve seen people try and claim Toronto is a Canadian Chicago which is absurd. The 2 cities are completely different in terms of politics, demographics, food cultures, built form, and histories.

The only thing they have in common is being a large city on the Great Lakes.

Don’t sell Canada short. I used to do that, I’ve learned better now that I have more experience.
Your completely trying to fudge the numbers by factoring in immigrants.


They are in no way representative of average Canadian or American values.

This is like trying to get a pulse on francophones in montreal by talking to anglos.
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  #114  
Old Posted Oct 17, 2019, 5:55 PM
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Originally Posted by CityTech View Post
The "average" Anglo-Canadian city is Peterborough. Its well known for this trait: its a very common place for marketers to test new brands and such.
For me it'd be something like London, Nanimo, Peterborough, Saskatoon, Lethbridge, Kelowna, Moncton etc.
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  #115  
Old Posted Oct 17, 2019, 5:56 PM
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Originally Posted by MonctonRad View Post
Nah, Moncton is the quintessential Canadian city:

- 2/3rds anglophone, 1/3rd francophone
- officially bilingual (both municipally and provincially)
- lot's of snow
- hockey mad
- there are 35 Tim Horton's outlets in the metropolitan area.
- municipal police force is the RCMP
- the city even owns it's own sugar bush and produces it's own maple syrup!
An example of how something can be average but not at all typical, with respect to Moncton's linguistic character, at least.
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  #116  
Old Posted Oct 17, 2019, 6:00 PM
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For me it'd be something like London, Nanimo, Peterborough, Saskatoon, Lethbridge, Kelowna, Moncton etc.
I'd guess Ottawa-Gatineau.

3/4 English-speaking, 1/4 French. Large enough that recent immigration trends have affected it, but small enough that it hasn't completely changed the character of the city.

Kind of bland and boring in a sense, but a place you could see being comfortable raising a family.

Our national capital reflects the country reasonably well.
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  #117  
Old Posted Oct 17, 2019, 6:02 PM
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Originally Posted by wave46 View Post
I'd guess Ottawa-Gatineau.

3/4 English-speaking, 1/4 French. Large enough that recent immigration trends have affected it, but small enough that it hasn't completely changed the character of the city.

Kind of bland and boring in a sense, but a place you could see being comfortable raising a family.

Our national capital reflects the country reasonably well.
Yeah well I don't factor in the french thing.

I'm a strong believer that Quebec has successfully fractured itself away from the rest of Canada.

I picked moncton because it's the only east coast city not on the ocean.
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  #118  
Old Posted Oct 17, 2019, 6:09 PM
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Originally Posted by LakeLocker View Post
Your completely trying to fudge the numbers by factoring in immigrants.


They are in no way representative of average Canadian or American values.

This is like trying to get a pulse on francophones in montreal by talking to anglos.
So you think the only people that matter are whites? God you’re one hell of a racist.


Let alone you completely ignore than the European population in Canada is FAR MORE British isles while us is far more influenced by Germans.

Demographics matter whether you like it or not, Canada and the us are very very different demographically and that has shaped our cultures.

White Canadians aren’t the same as white Americans outside of watching American tv and pop culture. By your definition white Australians would also be identical to Americans. It’s illogical inferiority complex inspired revisionist garbage.
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  #119  
Old Posted Oct 17, 2019, 6:12 PM
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Yeah well I don't factor in the french thing.

I'm a strong believer that Quebec has successfully fractured itself away from the rest of Canada.

I picked moncton because it's the only east coast city not on the ocean.
Then let's say "Ottawa" instead of "Ottawa-Gatineau". All of the non-language things wave46 mentioned apply to Ottawa alone as well.

Ottawa alone is also a good microcosm of the French language's status in Anglo-Canada. The city itself is pretty much all English speaking outside of the bubbles of officialdom and government where its bilingual. The city's economy, society, and workforce functions pretty much entirely in English outside of government.
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  #120  
Old Posted Oct 17, 2019, 6:17 PM
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Originally Posted by Bcasey25raptor View Post
So you think the only people that matter are whites? God you’re one hell of a racist.
And why did you think I specifically mentioned anglophone versus francophone montrealers. This isn't about race it's about what a person is exposed to while growing up.

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Originally Posted by Bcasey25raptor View Post

Let alone you completely ignore than the European population in Canada is FAR MORE British isles while us is far more influenced by Germans.
I'm not a racist I don't care where someone's last name came from. The fact that areas with strong Anglophone ancestry are so similar to places with large German ancestry is all the proof I need to be confident that ancestry isn't that important after 2-3 generations.


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Originally Posted by Bcasey25raptor View Post
Demographics matter whether you like it or not, Canada and the us are very very different demographically and that has shaped our cultures.
You mean races does?

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Originally Posted by Bcasey25raptor View Post
White Canadians aren’t the same as white Americans outside of watching American tv and pop culture. By your definition white Australians would also be identical to Americans. It’s illogical inferiority complex inspired revisionist garbage.
Australians are somewhere in between Brits and Anglo-Americans.

Do people even remember that Mel Gibson, Hugh Jackman, Heath Ledge, Chris Helmsworth Russel Crow etc are aussies?
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