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  #3221  
Old Posted Feb 5, 2013, 5:29 PM
xnyr xnyr is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NYguy View Post
I have to agree that this has helped in the excitement for this project. Rather than waiting for someone to drop by, you can see for yourself the action in real time. I wish more high profile developments in Manhattan would do the same.
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More and more projects are using webcams. Love it.

I totally agree!

You could say we are the Cyber Sidewalk Superintendent's Club
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  #3222  
Old Posted Feb 5, 2013, 9:19 PM
CCs77 CCs77 is offline
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As today, they already placed a bunch more rebar columns.
And by the way, notice there are two cement mixer trucks side by side, maybe working togheter?



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  #3223  
Old Posted Feb 6, 2013, 6:56 AM
Marc from Rotterdam Marc from Rotterdam is offline
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Sometimes it seems to me that concrete is first pumped up to the top of the core (with a concrete pump on truck), and from there down again to the outside columns and floor (with the concrete arm on top of the core).
As can be seen on the picture in the previous post...

But here from Europe, I have to rely fully on the webcams.
Can anybody from NYC-side explain what's actually going on concerning the way of concrete pumping/pouring?
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  #3224  
Old Posted Feb 6, 2013, 3:33 PM
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Originally Posted by Marc from Rotterdam View Post
Sometimes it seems to me that concrete is first pumped up to the top of the core (with a concrete pump on truck), and from there down again to the outside columns and floor (with the concrete arm on top of the core).
As can be seen on the picture in the previous post...

But here from Europe, I have to rely fully on the webcams.
Can anybody from NYC-side explain what's actually going on concerning the way of concrete pumping/pouring?
The mobile pump is connected to the pump on top of the core. The pump on top of the core distributes the concrete.
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  #3225  
Old Posted Feb 6, 2013, 3:39 PM
Ed007Toronto Ed007Toronto is offline
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Lovely shots.
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  #3226  
Old Posted Feb 6, 2013, 5:31 PM
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I thought they had finished the outer perimeter concrete on this floor but they have put in forms between and around the perimeter columns for the final white concrete pour.
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  #3227  
Old Posted Feb 6, 2013, 6:08 PM
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Originally Posted by THE BIG APPLE View Post
Just look at the pic on the last page (of the building). The windows on the bottom are apparently smaller than the windows higher up. Also look at the footprint of the lobby compared to a penthouse floor higher up.
You mean the windows that are clearly obscured by the building that is in front of them? That is why the appear narrower, because part of them is blocked.


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Originally Posted by CCs77 View Post
Aparently, they are doing something similar here. Two floorplans of the apartments, one of a small units, presumible of the lower floor, and a full floor apartment, that should be in the upper floors. As yo can see, the width of the columns seems the same, but they are clearly less "thick" in the full floor apartment







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Exactly. The size of the windows does not change.

Last edited by NYguy; Feb 6, 2013 at 10:57 PM.
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  #3228  
Old Posted Feb 6, 2013, 8:22 PM
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Cro Burnham Cro Burnham is offline
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here's an example of where the windows get wider and the columns narrower in a reinforced concrete frame building: one logan square in philadelphia. in this case, there are no recesses in the concrete to accommodate equal sized windows. the architect (KPF) wanted to reveal the structure.

actually, i think this and 333 wacker are two of KPF's purest, simplest and best designs from the 80s - 90s.


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  #3229  
Old Posted Feb 6, 2013, 11:30 PM
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  #3230  
Old Posted Feb 7, 2013, 1:31 PM
MrSlippery519 MrSlippery519 is offline
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And the floor slab is being poured...should see a jump in a few days
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  #3231  
Old Posted Feb 7, 2013, 3:40 PM
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NYguy,

Very nice pictures of the progress. It would be great if pictures were taken of the concrete pump and the Ferrara Brothers concrete trucks as the concrete is being pumped.
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  #3232  
Old Posted Feb 7, 2013, 5:47 PM
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ATLksuGUY ATLksuGUY is offline
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NYguy,

Very nice pictures of the progress. It would be great if pictures were taken of the concrete pump and the Ferrara Brothers concrete trucks as the concrete is being pumped.
Hey, welcome back Marcatio. You have been gone for a while. I, for one miss your informative posts. Maybe you have some insight on the concrete being used here. I was under the impression that two different types are being used. A standard high psi concrete for the columns and floors, and another white concrete for the facing. I was wondering, if two different types are being used, how well do they bond together? And with heat/cold expansion and contraction of the concrete over years, would this not lead to cracks in a two concrete form? I could be totally wrong, as I have zero construction experience so be gentle haha.
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  #3233  
Old Posted Feb 7, 2013, 8:21 PM
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ATLksuGUY,

There shouldn't be any problem with bonding the two different types of concrete, as essentially concrete is comprised of three main components, water, portland cement, and aggregates (crushed stone, washed gravel). The differences in the concrete mix designs come from the water/cement ratio, types of aggregates, and admixtures (additives added to give concrete different qualities).

Concrete that is exposed to weather is air-entrained concrete, that is concrete that has tiny air bubbles within which allow moisture within to expand when it freezes.

When two pours are made at different times, several methods are used to insure bonding. Sometimes an epoxy is painted on the previously poured concrete, or the surface of the previous pour is roughened to allow bonding.
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  #3234  
Old Posted Feb 7, 2013, 8:36 PM
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Once the building reaches seven floors or so and the concrete pumps arms can't reach that high, will they lift large pouring containers with the cranes, transfer the concrete to the pump on top of the core and use that arm to pour the concrete to the floors and columns just below?
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  #3235  
Old Posted Feb 7, 2013, 8:47 PM
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  #3236  
Old Posted Feb 7, 2013, 11:10 PM
RobEss RobEss is offline
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Another core jump!
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  #3237  
Old Posted Feb 8, 2013, 7:57 AM
Marc from Rotterdam Marc from Rotterdam is offline
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A few floors from now, the top of the core can not be reached by the arm of a truck-pump any more.
Then, the entire pumping must be done via risers in the core, with (in future) boosters at certain heights.
The concrete trucks will then deliver their loads at an undloading pit.

Technically no problem, as it was done at the Burj Khalifa up to 600 metres...

Also the floors will be concreted via the core pumps.
So the core can never grow really much faster than the floors.

Last edited by Marc from Rotterdam; Feb 8, 2013 at 10:53 AM.
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  #3238  
Old Posted Feb 8, 2013, 12:30 PM
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Pics by 57th&1st on SSC, look at that concrete on the left ... the middle one is already white and looks gorgeous!





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  #3239  
Old Posted Feb 8, 2013, 1:37 PM
Tall guy 31 Tall guy 31 is offline
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Another core jump!
How long in between jumps has it been......a little over a week or so, right?? Is that a good speed for this project??
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  #3240  
Old Posted Feb 8, 2013, 1:43 PM
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Flaky morning...(February 8, 2013)



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