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ethereal_reality Apr 23, 2014 3:20 AM

I don't believe we've seen this particular map. (I could be wrong....Tourmaline)

Los Angeles Life Fun Map 1945.
http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/xq90/843/bw97.jpg
ebay

http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/102...0/836/agwd.jpg

Wig-Wag Apr 23, 2014 4:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 6549887)
transit slide 1956.

pan right to see the green pickup truck...it's very cool.-------->:) Was it owned by the railway?
http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/xq90/834/w3v7.jpg
http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/320...0/834/32tj.jpgebay
__

ER, this photo was taken at the former Los Angeles Railway 12th and Georgia Street carbarn sometime after the acquisition of LARY by National City lines in 1947. National City Lines renamed the former LARY, Los Angeles Transit Lines and the PCC type streetcars in picture carry the NCL/LATL logo and corporate paint scheme. The truck looks to be a 1949 Chevy but it is not carrying the LATL logo and the resolution of the photo is not quite high enough to make out the lettering on the cab.

Since we are on the subject, a substantial number of transit properties around the country were acquired by National City Lines following WWII, and each can be recognized by the distinctive winged NCL logo which featured the city name followed by the the words "Transit Lines" or "City Lines". Examples: Los Angeles Transit lines, El Paso City Lines, Key System Transit Lines (San Francisco Bay Area), etc. National City Lines equipment also carried what came to be called the "fruit salad" livery of yellow on the bottom, green from the belt rail (base of the windows) to the edge of the roof and a white or tan roof depending on the type of equipment to which it was applied. For more on this controversial company see:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_City_Lines

Some corrections made to the above text reminded me of an experience I had posted on another site and I thought some viewers here might enjoy it. Hopefully the link will work as the site usually requires a password.

http://www.trainorders.com/discussio...65#msg-2160165

Cheers,
Jack

Hollywood Graham Apr 23, 2014 6:02 AM

Cool Pick Up
 
I could be wrong but being that the truck is green (Herald Express color) and the Street car barn was right across the street from the Herald building it might be theirs. Door writing is hard to read but you could possibly interpret it as Herald Express.

FredH Apr 23, 2014 7:21 AM

Zanja Madre
 
A few months ago, I was in Chinatown and noticed that Little Joe's was being torn down.

http://i129.photobucket.com/albums/p...psbb405b03.jpg
My Photo

Well, surprise! Under Little Joe's, the construction crew found the remains of the Zanja Madre (the Mother Ditch).

http://i129.photobucket.com/albums/p...ps20f0c831.jpg
KCET

http://i129.photobucket.com/albums/p...ps20766f3c.jpg
KCET

http://i129.photobucket.com/albums/p...psc5dc7b07.jpg
L.A. Times

http://i129.photobucket.com/albums/p...ps9d578fcb.jpg
L.A. Times

http://i129.photobucket.com/albums/p...psdb816a03.jpg
L.A. Times

This is the story in the L.A. Times:

By Bob Pool
April 21, 2014, 9:06 p.m.
Workers excavating the site of a $100-million Chinatown development have discovered a 100-foot section of Los Angeles' first municipal water system, an ancient maze of brick and wooden pipes and conduits that once fed the city.
The 4-foot-diameter brick pipe that was found beneath what once was Little Joe's restaurant is part of the so-called Mother Ditch, or Zanja Madre, that carried water from the Los Angeles River to the young city, its channels twisting and bending along a 90-mile network.
The antiquity was uncovered April 10 as workers were beginning construction on the Blossom Plaza, a five-story mixed-use apartment and storefront project on North Broadway. About 73 feet of the Mother Ditch have been exposed at the project site.
When first created in 1781, the Zanja Madre was an open ditch fed by a small dam built in the river, the city's main water source at the time.
Decades later, a 40-foot water wheel was constructed to increase the ditch's gravitational flow to a brick reservoir near Olvera Street. From there the network of pipes fanned out, carrying water to homes and to fields for irrigation.
Worried about public health, officials enclosed the Zanja Madre in 1877. It was finally abandoned in 1904.
Bits and pieces of the old water system have surfaced over the years. In 2005, workers constructing the Gold Line trolley extension came across a section of the Zanja Madre. About 75 feet of the uncovered pipe remain visible next to the trolley line and Broadway.
Other remnants can be seen in the basement of Olvera Street's 1818 Avila Adobe and along Figueroa Street, where a 3-foot-deep concrete "Sister Zanja" runs a short distance outside St. Vincent's Catholic Church near the corner of Figueroa and West Adams Boulevard.
A spur of the Zanja Madre also provided water that powered the millstone at the 1881 Capitol Milling Co. plant on Spring Street. The flour mill closed in the early 1990s.
City Councilman Gilbert Cedillo, who represents the Chinatown area, said a 40-foot section of the Zanja Madre will be removed Saturday from the Blossom Plaza site and preserved for future display. The plan is to exhibit sections of the Mother Ditch at the Blossom Plaza, the Los Angeles Historic State Park and at Metabolic Studios' planned Los Angeles River Water Wheel replica project, he said.
Cedillo said the preservation of the Zanja Madre section is significant because it "served as the lifeline to the survival and early development of Los Angeles."
He praised Blossom Plaza's developer, Forest City Enterprises, for taking pains to hire an archaeologist to monitor the excavation work and cited the willingness of Lauren Bon of Metabolic Studios to finance the Zanja Madre's excavation.
Archaeologist Lynn Furnis, on-site monitor with the Orange-based Cogstone Resource Management Inc., was quick to identify the brick pipe as being part of the Zanja system and immediately notified city officials, Cedillo said.
Sherri Gust, an archaeologist and Cogstone company principal, said experts had been searching for the Zanja Madre since the project's start. "We made a map of where we thought it might be and that's where it was," she said. It was about 12 feet beneath the site's surface.
Workers will use a vacuum to remove sediment from the brick Zanja Madre and carefully lift it out of the ground with a crane before taking it by flatbed truck to the river site where Bon's waterwheel project is being planned.
Nate Arnold, senior construction project manager with Forest City Enterprises, said a way will be found to integrate a portion of the Mother Ditch in Blossom Plaza's planned cultural center.
bob.pool@latimes.com

FredH Apr 23, 2014 8:04 AM

http://i129.photobucket.com/albums/p...ps39a68cc5.jpg
L.A. Times


The Times-Richfield ‘Electric Newspaper’
Posted By: Scott Harrison
Posted On: 12:30 a.m. | May 23, 2013
Oct. 1931: The Los Angeles Times-Richfield ‘Electric Newspaper’ lights up during preview at the corner of 6th and Hill streets.

The Oct. 12, 1931, Los Angeles Times proudly announced:

Beginning tonight at 7 o’clock and every night thereafter including Sunday, from 7 o’clock until midnight or thereabouts, the news of the world will march around the corner of 6th and Hill streets in incandescent letters four feet high.

This unique news bulletin service, the first of its kind in America, is made possible by the collaboration of the Los Angeles Times and Richfield Oil Co., and will be known at the Los Angeles Times-Richfield Electric Newspaper.

Everything that is news – local, state, national and world – will pass across the board during the five hours of its nightly operation. As the vast grist of the day’s news pours into The Times’ offices by telegraph, telephone, radio, mail and messenger, it will be concentrated into brief, snappy, informative bulletins by expert newspaper men and flashed by teletype to an office in the Paramount building at 6th and Hill, where is located the huge controller of the electric bulletin board. Here another squad of men will transcribe the bulletins by stenciling machines on the wide, endless tapes which, fed into the controller, project their perforated letters on the screen, made up of electric lights in multiple banks. The effect is that of letters of light, forming words and sentences and moving continuously from one end of the board to the other, a distance of some eighty feet.

The bulletin board has a frontage of about forty feet on 6th and the same distance on Hill Street, and the four-foot letters can be read for several blocks in all directions. The device by which each letter is made apparently to move the whole length of the board makes it possible to read everything flashed, even from points where only a small part of the board is visible.

Attesting his keen interest in this important forward step in modern methods of disseminating public information, Gov. James Rolph Jr. will personally open the service tonight with a brief message addressed to the people of Los Angeles.

It is estimated that some 300 separate and different bulletins, each representing an important piece of news and the whole constituting a condensed daily history of the world, will be flashed on the board in the five hours of operation. To accommodate the changing crowds, news of major importance will be repeated at intervals.

A story in the Aug., 1980, Times employee publication Among Ourselves, on the 1931 ‘Electric Newspaper’ added:

It was apparently thought that the flashing bulletins would stimulate Los Angeles residents to buy the paper the next day to read details behind the headlines. The Times faced stiff competition from several metropolitan papers during the ’30s, and having control of the bulletins read by thousands of people downtown was considered something of a coup.

http://i129.photobucket.com/albums/p...ps8d6a6e98.jpg
L.A. Times

Oct. 1931: The controller of the Times-Richfield ‘Electric Newspaper’

GaylordWilshire Apr 23, 2014 11:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by FredH (Post 6550070)
A few months ago, I was in Chinatown and noticed that Little Joe's was being torn down.

Well, surprise! Under Little Joe's, the construction crew found the remains of the Zanja Madre (the Mother Ditch).


A prior post with links to other prior posts on zanjas...

http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...as#post6541412

GaylordWilshire Apr 23, 2014 11:45 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 6549876)


The Edwards apartments were once at 1427 Griffith Ave (the red Google maps "drop" indicates a spot to the right of the phone pole below) in today's Fashion District:

https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-Y...2520AM.bmp.jpgGSV

HossC Apr 23, 2014 1:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 6549925)

I don't believe we've seen this particular map. (I could be wrong....Tourmaline)

Los Angeles Life Fun Map 1945.
http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/xq90/843/bw97.jpg

I was going to say that you'd posted the map before, but I checked the original post and found there are quite a few differences (I'm up to about 20). The original map can be seen here.

Although they're both dated 1945, it looks like the map above is later than the one which originally posted because it contains more attractions. I've highlighted some of the differences in the top left corner on the comparison below. A little further down, Lawry's is now below Sarnez and Richlor's when it was above them on the original map - did it move or was it originally shown in the wrong place?.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...A/LAFunMap.jpg


A couple of follow-ups to the original post:

http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...ostcount=17663

http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...ostcount=17700

ethereal_reality Apr 23, 2014 1:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HossC (Post 6550186)

:previous: Good eye HossC! I had a feeling they were different. ;)
I wonder what it says under that tiny house on the newly added Schuyler Road? And it looks like Ciro's leapfrogged over LaRue's.

Thanks for locating the address of the Edwards Apts. GW. -much appreciated.
__

ethereal_reality Apr 23, 2014 2:14 PM

WIG WAG, I loved this story so much I had to post it. (a lot of people skip the links)

http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/102.../834/a7whf.jpg
http://www.trainorders.com/discussio...65#msg-2160165

"I ain't wear'n' yer bra." lol
I'm curious, do you still have those photos you took as a 16 year old?
__

HossC Apr 23, 2014 2:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 6543080)

I found this 1940 aerial view of Lafayette Square which shows the site of the Paul Williams house and a couple of its neighbors when it was still an empty lot. I've highlighted it with the red box.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...etteSq1940.jpg
USC Digital Library

Using the extant Bekins Storage building on the corner of Crenshaw and Pico as a reference point, here's a close-up.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...tteSq1940b.jpg
Detail of picture above.

Roughly in the center of the close-up is the F.M Teter Building, also known as the Citizens Trust and Savings Bank's Pico-Bronson branch which I included in my recent round-up of their old buildings.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...coBronson1.jpg
USC Digital Library

While checking out the area in the Googlemobile, I spotted the building near the right of the close-up. I assumed that the building at 4061 West Pico must have appeared on NLA before. When I looked, I found this from January 2012:

Quote:

Originally Posted by GaylordWilshire (Post 5552059)

https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-2...2520AM.bmp.jpgGoogle Street View

The top of the sign says "Catch One"... as in Jewel's Catch One. No mention on its website of its time as the Diana Ballroom, but there is this:

"The history of Jewel’s Catch One is legendary. This is the club where Madonna held her CD release party. “Beaches” starring Bette Midler, Keenen Ivory Wayans’s, “I’m Gonna Get You Sucker”, “BAP” (Black American Princess) starring Hallie Berry, Angela Basset in “I Tina”, and Julia Roberts in “Pretty Woman”, several episodes of “Cold Case”, and numerous TV shows and videos have also been shot on the premises. The Catch has also played host to numerous famous celebrities and politicians, who have graced us with their presence."

The original question about the Diana Ballroom in the 1930s came from twobarbreak. Despite a bit of discussion about the building, I can't find any posts relating to when it was Joseph's Royale Cafe, seen here in 1926.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...phsRoyale1.jpg
USC Digital Library

I wonder if the interior is as well preserved as the exterior.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...phsRoyale2.jpg
USC Digital Library

ethereal_reality Apr 23, 2014 2:20 PM

http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/102...0/834/jzgh.jpg
Quote:

Originally Posted by Hollywood Graham (Post 6550048)
I could be wrong but being that the truck is green (Herald Express color) and the Street car barn was right across the street from the Herald building it might be theirs. Door writing is hard to read but you could possibly interpret it as Herald Express.

This is a great clue Hollywood Graham. Perhaps the Herald Express had a fleet of similar pickups to deliver newspapers to vendors.

http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/640...0/843/9der.jpg
ebay
__

Wig-Wag Apr 23, 2014 4:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 6550216)
WIG WAG, I loved this story so much I had to post it. (a lot of people skip the links)

http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/102.../834/a7whf.jpg
http://www.trainorders.com/discussio...65#msg-2160165

"I ain't wear'n' yer bra." lol
I'm curious, do you still have those photos you took as a 16 year old?
__

Yep. Sure do! However, not all are of the best quality do equipment and lack of experience.

Cheers,
Jack

ethereal_reality Apr 23, 2014 6:13 PM

A Six County Coordinated System: Freeways and Expressways (1958)

http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/xq90/842/8pwmg.jpg
http://www.flickriver.com/photos/walkingsf/4778411204/


I'm not sure what those smaller areas within the counties (they're mostly in San Bernardino County) represent.
-there's also one on the north border of Los Angeles County and Kern County.

....and look at tiny Orange County. i thought it was much larger than that.
__

ethereal_reality Apr 23, 2014 6:29 PM

I came across the above map while searching for information on Henry Wall of the Los Angeles Planning Commission.


Here's the photograph from ebay that stoked my interest.
http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/xq90/845/65bf.jpg
http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/640...0/843/e0rk.jpg

Does anyone recognize this area? There aren't many clues except for the small houses and the oil well. (and the hill)
__


Here's another map I found while searching for information on Henry Wall.

1946 map created for the Department of City Planning by Henry V. Wall (his name is at lower right)
http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/xq90/838/q9rl.jpg
http://www.lamag.com/citythink/cityt...reeway-plan-la

Yes it's really large/better to see the details.
__

HossC Apr 23, 2014 7:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 6550221)

http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/102...0/834/jzgh.jpg

This is a great clue Hollywood Graham. Perhaps the Herald Express had a fleet of similar pickups to deliver newspapers to vendors.

Here's a Herald Express pickup I found in a 1940 photo, although this one says Bakersfield underneath.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...p.jpg~original
Detail of picture below.

The full picture shows the 1925 Petroleum Building at Olympic and Flower. In 1940 it housed the General Motors Acceptance Corporation and Security First National Bank on the first floor.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...1.jpg~original
USC Digital Library

Behind the Petroleum Building was a another Associated gas station. It's now a parking lot.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...2.jpg~original
Detail of picture above.

Today, the Petroleum Building and the Standard Oil Building (behind the camera) are probably the only surviving buildings that would have been visible from this intersection in 1940. From this angle, the Ritz-Carlton is just out of sight.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...3.jpg~original
GSV

HossC Apr 23, 2014 7:48 PM

Picworth Market, located at Pico Boulevard and Hayworth Avenue, ca.1940. The neon sign on the right is for Ahrens Bros. Pies.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...APicworth1.jpg
USC Digital Library

Despite the front being filled in, the building (and its neighbor on the left) seems to have changed very little in just over 70 years.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...APicworth2.jpg
GSV

Martin Pal Apr 23, 2014 8:11 PM

HossC's comparison photo:

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...A/LAFunMap.jpg

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 6550192)
:previous: Good eye HossC! I had a feeling they were different. ;)
I wonder what it says under that tiny house on the newly added Schuyler Road? And it looks like Ciro's leapfrogged over LaRue's.
__

I can't make out that Schuyler Road attraction, either, but am curious about it!

Unless La Rue moved from another location that I'm not aware of, Ciro's and La Rue are in the right locations on the newly posted map. (I know Ciro's was always in the same place.)

In the new map, "The Kings" that HossC has highlighted, must be The Kings Restaurant I just posted a postcard of a page or two back:

Quote:

Originally Posted by Martin Pal (Post 6547283)
The Kings Restaurant (undated postcard)
The address is on or near the corner of Santa Monica Blvd. and Crescent Heights (north side)

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...estaurant1.jpgLAPL


Tourmaline Apr 23, 2014 8:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 6549925)
I don't believe we've seen this particular map. (I could be wrong....Tourmaline)

:blink:

I could be wrong too. Pretty sure we have seen this map before. Flyingwedge certainly used a portion of it here: http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...ostcount=13875 It's from the '20s and boasts the largest railroad in the world. Mentioning it again, since higher resolution versions make it worth a look see. (link here: http://www.bigmapblog.com/maps/map05...toGOZUeuag.jpg )

Manageable version:
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...ic_Railway.jpghttp://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...ic_Railway.jpg

ethereal_reality Apr 23, 2014 10:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HossC (Post 6550728)

Where the heck is the driver!? It looks like the pickup truck is driving itself. (you'd think, at the very least, you would see the driver's right shoulder)
__

Martin Pal, it's pretty cool 'The Kings' showed up on that 1945 fun map just a couple days after your postcard of the same venue.
(I thoroughly enjoyed your recent posts on Hollywood & Vine)
__


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