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mrnyc Feb 10, 2020 5:13 PM

^ yeah 14st is a complete success. its stunningly quiet in front of our place and no more schmutz on the windows or coming in.

there is absolutely no spillover traffic on 15th or 13st, that allegation was an outright lie by a few nimbys.

maybe there is a bump up on the nearby major cross streets of 23rd st and houston st, if anywhere. i dk, but definitely not in the immediate area.

also, bike lanes are being added and rubberized bump outs for the busses are in place on a trial basis. hopefully they are made permanent in time.

so no carpocalypse -- and the 14st busway is still a work in progress.

M II A II R II K Feb 14, 2020 5:48 PM

Britain’s Bold Plan for High-Speed Rail

https://www.citylab.com/transportati...ingham/606385/

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- A controversial high-speed rail project was green-lighted by the U.K. government this week that would connect Britain’s four largest metros. With the line’s first stage to Birmingham approved in 2017—then put on hold by the government last summer—the high-speed initiative already has a long history of controversy behind it, and has faced accusations of excessive cost and prioritizing Londoners’ needs over those of northerners. But if the project is executed right, it could nudge people away from not just the highways, but also some popular domestic flight routes. --- The 330 miles of new high-speed railway, referred to as HS2 and championed yesterday by Prime Minister Johnson, would connect London with Birmingham and then go onwards in two branches to the northern cities of Manchester and Leeds, on trains capable of speeds of up to 250 miles per hour.

- In a country where the capital tends to get the lion’s share of resources, many northerners have wondered why a super-fast link to London was approved before a project to improve east-west rail service between cities in Northern England, a region they believe is in more urgent need of rail improvement. Environmental protesters have also fought plans to carve the high-speed track through protected woodlands and vulnerable habitats (while nonetheless rerouting slightly to avoid a golf course). On top of this, many people have seen the ballooning budget and started to worry that the new link is little more than a state-subsidized gravy train. --- There are strong arguments, nonetheless, that HS2 will deliver benefits, both to the environment and to travelers who don’t have London as their final destination. By moving long-distance north-south traffic onto the new high-speed link, the project will free up space to increase train frequency on other parts of the network, which are currently working (and just about managing) at close to capacity.

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https://cdn.theatlantic.com/thumbor/...1/original.png

M II A II R II K Feb 17, 2020 4:07 PM

Alstom in talks over $7 billion Bombardier rail deal

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-b...-idUSKBN20B0LR

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- France’s Alstom (ALSO.PA) is in talks to buy the train business of Canada’s Bombardier (BBDb.TO) in a potential $7 billion deal that marks the latest attempt by Western rail companies to bulk up in the face of Chinese competition. — “Alstom confirms being in discussions with Bombardier regarding a possible acquisition of Bombardier Transportation ... No final decision has been made,” Alstom said in a statement on Monday.

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canucklehead2 Feb 17, 2020 8:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by M II A II R II K (Post 8833546)
Alstom in talks over $7 billion Bombardier rail deal

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-b...-idUSKBN20B0LR

A sad end for a once great company. Typical for Canadian businesses though... Hope they can do more with the company than Bombardier could...:cheers:

M II A II R II K Feb 21, 2020 4:46 PM

Columbia Street Two-Way Bus Corridor Opens Saturday

https://www.theurbanist.org/2020/02/...pens-saturday/

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- A new transit pathway in Downtown Seattle opens on Saturday. Local officials say that a two-way bus connection on Columbia Street will benefit more than 26,000 daily bus riders, providing easier and more reliable service between the city center and areas to the south. --- Transit riders on a dozen bus routes will be moved off of 4th Avenue and nearby streets passing through Pioneer Square to the new pathway. King County Metro is planning for Alaskan Way to be new transit pathway along with Columbia Street, where buses will travel along a four-block stretch with the new bus lanes and transit signals. --- That should speed buses to and from 2nd Avenue and 3rd Avenue transit spines through Downtown Seattle. The new transit pathway will also have other benefits for riders, bringing them closer to light rail, ferries, and eventually streetcar service.

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https://i0.wp.com/www.theurbanist.or...eg?w=666&ssl=1




https://i1.wp.com/www.theurbanist.or...eg?w=662&ssl=1




https://i2.wp.com/www.theurbanist.or...30%2C396&ssl=1




https://i0.wp.com/www.theurbanist.or...60%2C420&ssl=1




https://i0.wp.com/www.theurbanist.or...19%2C840&ssl=1

M II A II R II K Feb 24, 2020 6:38 PM

Commentary: The CTA Red Line extension is a mistake — Metra is ready to better serve the South Side

https://www.chicagotribune.com/opini...4cu-story.html

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- Mayor Lori Lightfoot and the CTA escalated a mystifying turf war recently against Cook County and Metra on Chicago’s South Side: CTA announced Feb. 10 that it would spend $38 million to study an extension of the Red Line to 130th Street. The proposed project is not just expensive for an aboveground rail line — its cost, $2.3 billion for 5.3 miles, could pay off CTA’s entire unfunded pension liability — but it also serves an area already covered by two Metra lines, Rock Island and Metra Electric. --- Lightfoot still resists Metra’s proposals to run these lines more like the “L,” with frequent service, low fares and free transfers to CTA service. She is doing her constituents a disservice. Rather than invest in the Red Line boondoggle, the city should support efforts to fix up Metra, as community and business advocates on the South Side have long advocated.

- Suburban politicians in Cook County and Metra’s board support the South Side community’s eminently sensible wish list of efficient improvements to Metra Electric. It’s Mayor Lightfoot who supports an expensive alternative that would give the South Side inferior service. --- If Lightfoot won’t play nice with Cook County and Metra’s unprecedentedly generous offer, the Federal Transit Administration should step in and reject federal funding for the Red Line extension. The point of federal involvement in local transit is to mediate pointless political rivalries in a way that provides the greatest public benefit and protects disadvantaged communities. Rare indeed is a better case for federal involvement than this one. --- This fight is a no-brainer. Cancel the Red Line extension, send the CTA’s planned capital spending to the Cook County pilot with Metra, and start building the future that community leaders have demanded for decades: transit service and fare integration on Metra in Chicago.

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https://www.chicagotribune.com/resiz...EMFAAWQSVY.jpg

M II A II R II K Mar 1, 2020 7:03 PM

No ‘carmageddon’ on auto-free Market Street. Study shows bikes and buses benefit

https://www.sfchronicle.com/bayarea/...F-15087210.php

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- San Francisco’s car ban on Market Street — introduced a month ago after 10 years of handwringing — has barely affected motorists, with almost no spillover traffic on side streets. But it’s a huge improvement for buses, streetcars and bicycles. Congestion increased only marginally on nearby roads, according to new data from the traffic analytics firm Inrix. It shows that the biggest slowdown occurred on Mission Street, where southbound vehicle speeds decreased by 4% — from 10.3 miles per hour to 9.9 miles per hour — during the 8 a.m. commute. On other adjacent streets, car speeds declined by an average of 1%.

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https://s.hdnux.com/photos/01/10/56/...9/11/940x0.jpg

SFBruin Mar 1, 2020 11:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by M II A II R II K (Post 8840900)
Commentary: The CTA Red Line extension is a mistake — Metra is ready to better serve the South Side

Just to play devil's advocate here: What would the operating costs be of running more frequent commuter rail trains on the South Side?

Is it possible that the city could eventually save money by building a heavy-rail extension to the far South Side and running it with lower operating costs?

Mr Downtown Mar 2, 2020 2:21 AM

They're pretty comparable. The Metra trains will typically have a crew of 3 or 4. The CTA trains will have only an operator on board—but will need round-the-clock station attendants at four new stations.

Because the Metra trains already pass through the area, you can achieve 10-minute headways by just adding a few short-turn trains each hour. Extending the Red Line trains into such a low-density area means a waste of hundreds of platform hours each day.

M II A II R II K Mar 2, 2020 6:21 PM

‘You can only make roads so big’: Charlotte region launches first transit plan

https://plancharlotte.org/Story/Char...t-plan-kickoff

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- Called CONNECT Beyond, the 18-month planning effort by the Centralina Council of Governments is, to put it simply, big. The planning area covers 12 counties, in two states, with 17 different transit systems. Previous transit planning efforts have been focused mostly on one county at a time. The goal here is to come up with a plan to coordinate and prioritize projects, as well as funding requests, across the whole region. “Twenty years from now, I think everyone is going to look back on this as the jumping-off point,” said John Muth, the Charlotte Area Transit System’s chief development officer.

- Participants talked about light rail, commuter rail, self-driving cars, autonomous drone taxis, scooters, sidewalks and bicycles. The need to think big and break down the silos and jurisdictional lines was a constant refrain. They worried about whether growth could someday morph from Charlotte’s blessing to the city’s curse, as more and more people clog congested thoroughfares, unless we invest more in transit now. And local leaders emphasized the need for small, incremental changes (say, increased express bus service and fare systems that work across counties) to help people see actual changes.

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https://plancharlotte.org/sites/defa...?itok=hpkfTzac

M II A II R II K Mar 2, 2020 6:24 PM

America doesn’t need an ambitious pedestrian-safety target. We need seven of them.

https://usa.streetsblog.org/2020/02/...-infographics/

https://usa.streetsblog.org/wp-conte...nfographic.png

mrnyc Mar 3, 2020 5:59 PM

^ i would be happy with just taking out a lane and widening sidewalks in most downtowns.

make it safer and more pleasant for pedestrians instead of squeezing them.

who doesnt like a sidewalk cafe on a nice day?

M II A II R II K Mar 6, 2020 4:34 PM

Goodyear's biodegradable concept tire regenerates its tread

https://techxplore.com/news/2020-03-...generates.html

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- Goodyear recently unveiled a tire concept that could revolutionize the auto industry. Dubbed reCharge, this concept tire would never require replacements or rotations because it regenerates its tread as needed. In addition to eliminating flat tires and the need to check tire pressure, the concept's regeneration features would be customized to the driving habits and conditions of individual motorists courtesy of a combination of AI and telemetry data. --- The crux of reCharge's regeneration capabilities is a biodegradable, reloadable liquid compound that's recharged by capsules. The compound is fortified by a mixture of dandelion rubber and fibers similar to spider silk, known to be one of the toughest raw materials found in nature. reCharge would push out this paste on demand through pipes to the wheel's surface, where it hardens into new tread.

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https://scx1.b-cdn.net/csz/news/800/...0dcff15b2d.jpg

M II A II R II K Mar 18, 2020 8:15 PM

How Helsinki and Oslo cut pedestrian deaths to zero

https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...deaths-to-zero

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- They cut speed limits, changed street design, removed space for cars and generally made life harder for motorists. Now it appears the work is paying off. Two of Europe’s smaller capital cities – Oslo and Helsinki – are reaping the rewards of committed action on making their roads safer, reducing pedestrian fatalities to zero last year.

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https://i.imgur.com/3vuBEwO.jpg?1

SpongeG Mar 19, 2020 9:14 PM

Video Link


Video Link

SpongeG Mar 19, 2020 9:41 PM

Video Link

Marshal Mar 22, 2020 3:35 AM

In the category of poor inter city connectivity:
The land routes between Vienna and Prague are weirdly indirect, slow, and underdeveloped. There is no direct line freeway. The one leaving Vienna north and west is not complete to Brno (that may have changed), and the one leaving Prague south and east, goes to Bratislava, not Vienna. So, to drive by expressway, you have to go east from Vienna to Bratislava (admittedly not too far) and then go to Prague. I think rail is worse. The train route does not accommodate high speed, and like the road route, is quite indirect. It is 4 hours by train: leaving Vienna and going east and north almost to Poland before heading west to Prague. HSR over the separating distance would take about an hour. Don't know why.


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