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revheavyg Jan 8, 2013 6:08 AM

Lou Henry Hoover School Whittier, CA
 
http://i1299.photobucket.com/albums/...ps18e5cc84.jpg
(pic by by l1011tristar17)
(story from livingnewdeal) 6302 S. ALTA AVENUE WHITTIER, CA 90601 Lou Henry Hoover School is located on a small, quiet residential street, nestled into the Whittier hills, not far from some of the most beautiful, historic homes of the area. We are proud of the beauty of our school, which was designed in 1938 by renowned architect William Harrison. It was built as a WPA Project and the craftsmanship used is remarkable. The building's style is Art Moderne and the Whittier City School District has taken special care to maintain its historical and aesthetic integrity. Students and staff are greeted daily by an intricately sculpted mural which depicts a scene of the early Quakers who founded the city of Whittier more than one hundred years ago, and a sign which bears the words: "What you would want in the life of a nation you must first put into its schools." This quote by Von Humbold[t] provides us with a daily reminder of our mission to help students develop the skills and character necessary for leadership.http://livingnewdeal.berkeley.edu/pr...l-whittier-ca/

Lwize Jan 8, 2013 3:29 PM

http://www.trbimg.com/img-50eb9449/t...d-20130107/600
(image: Barbara Davidson, Los Angeles Times / January 5, 2013)
Quote:

Regular customers fill the stools at the China Cafe's soda-fountain-style bar inside the Grand Central Market in downtown Los Angeles. The menu and prices are like old-time L.A., throwbacks some people fear could be lost in a planned revamp of the market.
Quote:

A Grand Central Market makeover? It could work
Traditionalists are worried that a planned revamp of the downtown L.A. landmark will destroy its authenticity. That doesn't have to happen.

By Gale Holland, Los Angeles Times

January 7, 2013, 7:41 p.m.

At 9 a.m. sharp, the man in the blue blazer swung a brass bell over his head, a rite that dates back to the Grand Central Market's opening day in 1917. A minute later, nearly every swivel chair at the China Cafe counter was filled, mostly by older men hunched over bowls of wonton soup.

"It's not a fancy place," said Concepcion Orellano, 57. "People come here because they are poor."

Owner Rinco Cheung, an experienced restaurateur and Hong Kong native, confided he didn't know what chop suey was until he took over China Cafe from his wife's cousin last year.

"It's very old-style," Cheung said, pointing out the menu boards overhead, which list several "egg fo yeung" dishes the owner also didn't recognize. "They love it like that," he added.

Which is precisely the problem. I too love the Grand Central Market: its Beaux Arts touches, the flowing script of the neon signs at each stall, the weird store names — "Jones Grain Mill" — the exposed pipes and pendant light fixtures.

And I'm a fan of the back-in-the-day comfort food and retro prices in the cavernous food hall between Broadway and Hill streets. On Friday, (small) avocados were on sale at one of the produce stands seven for $1, and Jose's Ice Cream Corner had cones for $1.50. The market, with its mix of Mexican, Chinese, Japanese and Middle Eastern food, is one of the last holdouts of the $5-or-less lunch plate in downtown Los Angeles.

But landmarks cannot live on nostalgia alone. And even the most militant preservationist has to see it's time to shake up the venerable food emporium. Downtown's population has exploded, but the Grand Central Market clearly is failing to bring in many of its new, upscale urbanistas. Last week, I saw more vacant space than I can remember at any point in the last decade.

Alarms went off after The Times reported on the planned makeover by Adele Yellin, president of the development company started by her late husband, Ira. The news bounced around the blogosphere, drawing complaints about a loss of authenticity. Times staff writer Joseph Serna denounced the gentrification of the "people's market."

The minds behind the chichi Ferry Building, a foodie mecca in San Francisco, are involved; a consultant told Times reporter Betty Hallock his "fantasy" is a pocket cafe or sushi bar under the stairs.

The consternation seems somewhat misplaced. The basement's tenants now are a passport photo place and one of those ubiquitous 99-cent-style discount stores; I doubt they'll be missed much.

But our history of slash-and-burn urban renewal does not give comfort. It brings to mind the Vietnam War tag line: We had to destroy the village to save it.

Bunker Hill was flattened. Nothing was preserved of the magnificent Ambassador Hotel when Los Angeles Unified converted it to a public school. Instead, the district built kitschy facsimiles of the hotel's Paul R. Williams-designed coffee shop and Cocoanut Grove nightclub. The once-glamorous Brown Derby icon sits atop a strip mall in Koreatown, robbed of any history or meaning.

I talked to Yellin and her developer, Rick Moses, and I believe they are sincere about maintaining the character of the market. After all, her late husband kept his promise not to make the place "Westside cute" during an earlier overhaul in the 1990s. The changes thus far are modest: the sawdust was removed, and the floors, pipes and ceiling are being scrubbed and polished.

"Yes, we want to clean it up, but we don't want to change the feel of it," Moses told me.

But how about also committing to structuring rents so that at least some portion of the market's offerings remain affordable?

It's only fair. The public has a sizable stake in the Grand Central Market. Local agencies financed $44 million in bonds for Ira Yellin's renovation of the historic market and the Homer Laughlin Building above it. The market today still owes the Metropolitan Transportation Authority and the now-defunct L.A. Community Redevelopment Agency $32 million, Moses said.

People come downtown not simply for its historic charm, but because it's a beautiful mess — a hodgepodge of what came before, what's hot now, grit, glitz and authenticity.

Retired computer systems engineer Daniel Kerr took the train in from San Clemente to visit the China Cafe on Friday for the wonton soup but also to take in the action.

"I like city life," he said. "There's so much to see and to do. it's just interesting." Being on a fixed income, he'll probably have to cut back on the China Cafe if a meal there goes up to $10 or more, he said.

"I think it's so cool here," said Adrian Aguilar, 25, an El Monte native who recently moved into a loft downtown. "I love sushi, but this is just like straight from the streets of L.A."

Aguilar, tattooed and dressed head to toe in black, said he had musician friends coming in from New York and was "all excited to bring them to places like this."

Moses and Yellin say there is no intention to purge existing tenants, just to fill the holes. As a sign of good faith, they recently signed Las Morelianas, of pig snout taco fame, to a new lease.

Cheung kept the old menu and employees when he took over the China Cafe. This, along with his beer license, the only one in the market, undoubtedly helped him hang on to old customers. He has high hopes the new style can blend with the old. "Why not mix it all together?" he said.

What a concept: a real mixed-used project.

gale.holland@latimes.com
http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la...,6465163.story

unihikid Jan 8, 2013 4:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tovangar2 (Post 5963129)
Lots of info re LA oil wells here including the faux-office-building ones:
http://www.nileguide.com/destination...n-los-angeles/
-and-
http://www.clui.org/newsletter/sprin...ur-urban-crude

Map of all wells and related sites:
https://maps.google.com/maps/ms?ie=U...,0.011362&z=17

When I owned each of two houses in WLA I got a little check every year to compensate me for the oil pumped out from under the houses by the slant-drilling Venoco "Flower Tower".

It now looks different from the old days, but the pumping continues:
http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/179374/186014.jpg
www.mtfca.com

My family owned a house on kenwood up until the late 70s,and the royality checks from pumping were issued by union oil,when my grandmother bought the two properties on spauling(about 800 ft away from the faux office well)they were issued by standard oil,here are is a scan of the statements.Im sure 75 bucks a month in 1968 dollars was a good bit of money.

http://i292.photobucket.com/albums/m...ikid/new-1.jpg
photo by me

malumot Jan 8, 2013 6:07 PM

I <<HEART>> maps........lol

USC played some of their football games at Fiesta Park in the early 1910s.

And something else on that map was nagging at me.....

Of course....the Ponet Square Apartments.

One of LA's deadliest residential fires, September, 1970.

19 fatalities.

http://lafire.com/famous_fires/1970-...tHotelFire.htm

Quote:

Originally Posted by tovangar2 (Post 5963466)
No luck with old pix. Even though 1130 S Hope was supposed to have been built in 1909, it doesn't show on the 1909 map.
Fiesta Park (on the next block over) was a surprise to me:

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-L...630%2520PM.jpg
http://www.bigmapblog.com/2011/birds...f-los-angeles/


GaylordWilshire Jan 8, 2013 9:36 PM

:previous:


http://img96.imageshack.us/img96/429...ccompl1200.jpg

The Ponet Square Apartments, early on., and the end, September 13, 1970.

http://img4.imageshack.us/img4/5581/ponetfire1200.jpglafire.com


http://img442.imageshack.us/img442/3...tfloorplan.jpg

If this image of the Ponet's floorplan were clearer, it would be fascinating...but at least it shows the irregular shape of the building. Sometime after the fire, safety doors to enclosed stairwells were ordered installed in all pre-1943 L.A. residential structures of three stories or more--they were afterward referred to as “Ponet Doors.”

1st & 3rd pics from Building Los Angeles

FredH Jan 9, 2013 2:10 AM

1949
 
Looking west from Bunker Hill Avenue

http://img266.imageshack.us/img266/1751/00059376.jpg
lapl

FredH Jan 9, 2013 2:24 AM

Sorry, I couldn't resist it
 
Here is the fifth shooting victim of the Mickey Cohen assassination attempt at Sherry's.

http://img442.imageshack.us/img442/7...nshot14970.jpg
L.A. Times

Per L.A. Times
"Oct. 19, 1950: Portrait of Los Angeles Mirror columnist Florabel Muirs at work a year after the Mickey Cohen shooting incident. Muirs was slightly injured in the shooting, getting struck in backside resulting in a bruise."

The thought of Florabel out clubbing with Mickey Cohen and his crew at 4:00 A.M. is just too funny. I have to give her credit though, she took one for the team!

tovangar2 Jan 9, 2013 2:27 AM

Ponet Square/Stratford Arms/Dorothy Mae
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by GaylordWilshire (Post 5964932)
Sometime after the fire, safety doors to enclosed stairwells were ordered installed in all pre-1943 L.A. residential structures of three stories or more--they were afterward referred to as “Ponet Doors.”

It's a great pity that the Ponet doors didn't save the 25 people who died in the Stratford Arms fire in 1973 on W 6th or the further 25 killed in the Dorothy Mae Apartments blaze in 1982 at 821 W Sunset (arson, like the Ponet Square fire). Apparently further regulations have improved things considerably.

rcarlton Jan 9, 2013 3:06 AM

"Ornate street lights -- relics of gingerbread era -- H.J. Lindhardt, Bureau of Street Lighing, examines fixtures." -- Examiner clipping attached to verso, dated 4 October 1959.

http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/utils/...001&DMROTATE=0USC

rcarlton Jan 9, 2013 3:08 AM

This is a photo of the Santa Fe Railroad Hospital which opened in Boyle Heights in 1904. In 1924 the building was razed and rebuilt. In 1937 the hospital was renamed Linda Vista. Now abandoned, it's said to be one of the most haunted places in LA.

http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/utils/...203&DMROTATE=0USC

http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/utils/...203&DMROTATE=0USC

The Moorish-style building, built on a slanted hill, has multicurved parapets, arched windows, semi-circular doorways, and a dome tower. Two sets of stairways, linked to the main road, form a y-shaped walkway leading to the main entrance. A sign above the main entrance reads: "Santa Fe Coast Lines Hospital Association". Trees and palms line the road parallel to the building. The lawn in the foreground is populated with thick grass, flowers and plants.

rcarlton Jan 9, 2013 3:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by FredH (Post 5965387)
Here is the fifth shooting victim of the Mickey Cohen assassination attempt at Sherry's.

http://img442.imageshack.us/img442/7...nshot14970.jpg
L.A. Times

Per L.A. Times
"Oct. 19, 1950: Portrait of Los Angeles Mirror columnist Florabel Muirs at work a year after the Mickey Cohen shooting incident. Muirs was slightly injured in the shooting, getting struck in backside resulting in a bruise."

The thought of Florabel out clubbing with Mickey Cohen and his crew at 4:00 A.M. is just too funny. I have to give her credit though, she took one for the team!

http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/.a/6...3ba6a97970b-pi Los Angeles Times file photo

Muir, above, has a terrific description of the Busgy Siegel crime scene and, yes, she’s the reporter who got hit in the rear during the attempted killing of Mickey Cohen at Sherry’s in 1949. Trivia note: The Times’ only mention of Muir being shot is in a Hedda Hopper column that says Muir was sporting an “Italian sunset.”

kznyc2k Jan 9, 2013 4:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tovangar2 (Post 5954963)
I'm still wondering why the Angels Flight station house got truncated in the 20's.....

Jim Dawson touched upon this briefly in his newish book "Los Angeles's Bunker Hill" in saying that both the lookout tower (with its camera obscura) and the pavillion area were torn down in in the late '20s because geologists and whoever else declared the land too unstable for them. I'm re-reading through the book now (it's a fun, breezy read!) and once I find the exact quote I'll edit this post for posterity's sake.

Flyingwedge Jan 9, 2013 5:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GaylordWilshire (Post 5963721)

Great info on Fiesta Park! I'd never seen a picture of it before.

Someone must know what block of Broadway we're looking at here; this photo was taken shortly before Saturday, November 2, 1907, when the St. Vincent's - Utah game, advertised on the banner, was played (St. Vincent's is now LMU):

http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...oadway1907.jpg
A crowd of 5,000 at Fiesta Park saw the St. Vincent's beat Utah, 11-5. USC fans at the game rooted for Utah, "causing a good deal of unfavorable comment from friends of St. Vincent's."

(Water and Power Associates photo)
http://waterandpower.org/museum/Earl...29_Page_2.html
Game info from LA Herald:
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lc...d-1/seq-19.pdf

P.S. Just noticed that the five-globed light fixture at the bottom of the 1907 picture looks like the one in the scrap pile in rcarlton's post #11451 today.

revheavyg Jan 9, 2013 6:28 AM

Sears Mail order Building
 
http://i1299.photobucket.com/albums/...pscd8dd2ec.jpglocation unknown-Flickr
http://i1299.photobucket.com/albums/...ps704f1a26.jpglocation unknownpic-Flickr
http://i1299.photobucket.com/albums/...ps56b21bb3.jpgmemphis Tennessee pic-mallofmemphis
http://i1299.photobucket.com/albums/...ps1a779f85.jpgMinneapolis pic-Lance Murphey
http://i1299.photobucket.com/albums/...ps20c6c4c1.jpglocation unknown-pic-mallofmemphis
http://i1299.photobucket.com/albums/...ps96ed258a.jpgboyle heights pic-viewfromaloft.typepad.com

Eight of these Sears retail and catalog centers were built around the US - only 6 remain.
City Floors Built Status
Minneapolis 13 1928 City weighing RFP responses for redevelopment
Boston 12 1928 Redeveloped in 2000 as mixed-use Landmark Center
Memphis 14 1927 Vacant. For sale by private owner
Atlanta 14 1925 20% occupied by municipal depts. City considering sale.
Los Angeles 13 1925 Continuous commercial use
Phildelphia 13 1919 Demolished in 1994
Kansas City #2 12 1925 Demolished in 1997
Kansas City 10 1913 Redeveloped 2002 as upscale residential property.
Dallas 11 1910 Redeveloped 2001 as mixed-use Southside on Lamar.
Source: skyscrapers.com

ProphetM Jan 9, 2013 7:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rcarlton (Post 5965430)
This is a photo of the Santa Fe Railroad Hospital which opened in Boyle Heights in 1904. In 1924 the building was razed and rebuilt. In 1937 the hospital was renamed Linda Vista. Now abandoned, it's said to be one of the most haunted places in LA.

How funny - Linda Vista Hospital (mainly just the sign out front, really) just had a brief cameo this evening in an episode of NCIS: Los Angeles. :haha:

BrandonJXN Jan 9, 2013 5:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rcarlton (Post 5965430)
This is a photo of the Santa Fe Railroad Hospital which opened in Boyle Heights in 1904. In 1924 the building was razed and rebuilt. In 1937 the hospital was renamed Linda Vista. Now abandoned, it's said to be one of the most haunted places in LA.

Video Link

malumot Jan 9, 2013 7:03 PM

Nice find. I believe it's a first on here.

There's lots of photos looking UP at the hill. Not nearly as many taken from the crest, looking down. Especially the "back" side.

Probably a CRA official dreaming how he could make the entire hill magically disappear.

He would get his wish.


Quote:

Originally Posted by FredH (Post 5965366)
Looking west from Bunker Hill Avenue

http://img266.imageshack.us/img266/1751/00059376.jpg
lapl


AlvaroLegido Jan 9, 2013 9:52 PM

Bunker Hill and 2nd.
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by FredH (Post 5965366)
Looking west from Bunker Hill Avenue

http://img266.imageshack.us/img266/1751/00059376.jpg
lapl

You're right Malumot. It's a first on here. The street that turns to the right is 2nd Street. The Stanley Hotel is at Flower and Second, up East the West portal of the 2nd Street tunnel which makes a wall on the photograph.

ethereal_reality Jan 9, 2013 10:00 PM

http://imageshack.us/a/img703/6372/a...rewithinth.jpg
ebay

http://imageshack.us/a/img266/6372/a...rewithinth.jpg





below: A LARGER view of this opulent interior.

http://imageshack.us/a/img820/6372/a...rewithinth.jpg
ebay/detail



http://imageshack.us/a/img690/3192/a...reearringb.jpg
ebay





A short bio on George E. Feagans circa 1913.

http://imageshack.us/a/img59/7296/aa...rew2george.jpg
http://www.sfgenealogy.com/





The earlier jewelry firm of Brock & Feagans.

http://imageshack.us/a/img856/3427/a...rebrockfea.jpg
ebay
__

ethereal_reality Jan 9, 2013 10:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GaylordWilshire (Post 5513835)
http://jpg1.lapl.org/spnb01/00007141.jpgLAPL

http://jpg1.lapl.org/pics18/00008773.jpgLAPL

Speaking of "White Spots," here's a restaurant I noticed listed on the aforementioned ailing latimemachines.

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-4...2520PM.bmp.jpglatimemachines.

The location above is, of course, given away by the Wilshire Specials....


5467 Wilshire (at Dunsmuir) still stands, though pretty much ruined by alterations:
https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-c...2520PM.bmp.jpgGoogel Street View





I just came across this original negative/photograph of a different 'White Spot' located at 5357 Wilshire Blvd. (address given by the ebay seller)

http://imageshack.us/a/img831/5580/a...bayjan2013.jpg




Why the 'New Club Royal' sign on the roof? Which is it?

http://imageshack.us/a/img580/8986/a...ewclubroya.jpg






http://imageshack.us/a/img803/5203/a...tjandetail.jpg





the market-delicatessen on the side. I can't quite read the sign.....it's 'something' Bros.....ARA Bros...ABA Bros??
(the sign is visible in the first photo and second photo)
http://imageshack.us/a/img832/305/aa...jandetail2.jpg







the neg.
http://imageshack.us/a/img10/1849/aabwhiteneg.jpg
__


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