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rick m May 15, 2014 2:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tetsu (Post 6576480)
That hilltop Victorian at the NE corner of 1st & Figueroa always intrigued me (upper right of the first pic, upper center of the first). I always thought it fronted onto Flower, which was why it seems hidden by the other houses, but the aerial clearly shows that my perception of the distance between Flower & Figueroa was way off. I also always thought it was one main floor, but the aerial shows it was a two-story house. Anybody have any other info/closer photos of the house? I've got another version of the first photo in the quote with an interesting annotation in the upper right corner, reading "Korean Society Site (Chang Ho House)". Wonder if it can provide any clues for anyone who might know:

http://i1312.photobucket.com/albums/...psda0c67c5.jpgfrom my files

That note made by myself 6 or so yrs ago with permission at USC whilst uncovering Bunker Hill info...The staff at the Chang Ho widow's home on USC campus put me in touch with the Smithsonian , whereupon I was provided with a rare copy of the entire Korean Society gathered on the front porch at 106 N.Figueroa. USC site for their surviving structure is fascinating...

Tourmaline May 15, 2014 11:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Godzilla (Post 6005490)

A short jog from this address, at the corner of New Hampshire Avenue and 4th Street, is an interesting and imposing Korean Church that started out as the Sinai Temple East. At some point the temple served as a temporary home for the University of Judaism, now on the westside. Not unlike the former William Penn Hotel, over the years it appears to have lost parts of its roof/towers. I am sure it's been mentioned, but I am assuming the missing architecture is all a result of the Field Act, following the '33 Quake.


Although the source indicates a '47 -'48 date, the thick, illuminated stop sign, is a good indicator that the date may be as early as the late '20s early '30s. ;)

http://imgzoom.cdlib.org/Converter?i...=0&w=879&h=736CalStLib

http://imgzoom.cdlib.org/Converter?i...5&w=1200&h=736

Noirish view from Vermont Ave.
http://25.media.tumblr.com/9cd50150b...natdo1_500.jpghttp://www.tumblr.com/tagged/vermont%20avenue



A contemporary view of the structure along with a temporary structure in the foreground. :rolleyes:
http://farm5.staticflickr.com/4025/4...0d34eaa8_z.jpgFlickr



1988 - A ringing in the ears? Wonder if those removed steeples/belfries housed bells - or were they purely decorative. Interesting hanging orbs, which appear to be illuminated in one of above photos. Stop signs are now slimmer and trimmer. ;)
http://catalog.library.ca.gov/exlibr...VSC5VBPK3B.jpghttp://catalog.library.ca.gov/exlibr...VSC5VBPK3B.jpg

HossC May 15, 2014 1:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by FredH (Post 6575345)

11/15/60 - Center building is the Hoegee Sporting Goods Store at 138-142 South Main Street. The modernist City Health Building (1952, Lunden Hayward and O'Connor) at 1st and Main Streets in the distance.

http://i129.photobucket.com/albums/p...ps8e01fab2.jpg
http://hdl.huntington.org/cdm/single...d/8923/rec/372

Quote:

Originally Posted by WS1911 (Post 6576057)

That ghost of a staircase on the wall of the sporting goods store is intriguing. Does anyone know what building was there?

Quote:

Originally Posted by Noircitydame (Post 6578407)

This seems to be another one of those under-photographed blocks. The 1921 Baist map shows the Weil Block there. The LAPL has a photo of the Weil Block, and says it "housed the Security Savings Bank and Trust Co., a predecessor of the contemporary Security Pacific National Bank, which opened in this building on Main Street, on February 11, 1889" It was a 3-story building. But none of this helps explain the ghost staircase!

http://i281.photobucket.com/albums/k...ock-lapl-1.jpg
http://jpg2.lapl.org/pics26/00047798.jpg

USC has this picture dated December 1, 1932. It shows the Hoegee Sporting Goods Store, the Weil Block, and the Hotel Yorke on the corner.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...ndMain1932.jpg
USC Digital Library

HDL has another color shot dated 2/15/60 (nine months before the one posted by FredH. The lower two floors of the Weil Block are still standing and the Meyberg Bros ghost sign hasn't been uncovered yet.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...ndMain1960.jpg
Huntington Digital Library

The March 1960 CD only lists the businesses that were still open.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...Main1960CD.jpg
LAPL

The 1956 CD fills in some of the gaps.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...Main1956CD.jpg
LAPL

MichaelRyerson May 15, 2014 3:56 PM

I know, too much free time. What can I say.
 
https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2923/...ca51de13_k.jpgView looking northwest across Central Park and the southern slope of Bunker Hill, ca.1912

Stunning view. Jam packed and including the Hildreth, the Leonard Rose and the Brunson, three of the five Bunker Hill 'painted ladies', all in one image. I
believe the camera was on the roof of the new Desmond's building at 555 S. Spring Street looking northwest across Mercantile Place (out-of-frame at the
bottom) which would ultimately become the Arcade Building.

Three highlights from which we can reference other smaller images are, (one) the Pantages
Theater (w/sign) center/bottom at 534 S. Broadway, (two) the northeast corner of Central (Pershing Square) Park lower left edge at the SW corner of
5th and S. Hill Streets and (three) the large white building under construction center right is the Metropolitan Building on the NW corner of 5th Street and
Broadway.

First, the two horizons. One, the Santa Monica Mountains showing through the haze with the highest point (pretty much in the center of the
pic) being Mount Lee which will host the Hollywoodland sign in about ten years. And then the second, the urban horizon of houses and buildings, with the
Hildreth Mansion (NW corner of 4th and Hope Streets, dark outline near the left edge) and just to the right of the Hildreth, the prominent, squarish Zelda
Apartment/Hotel with the distinctive capped rooftop solarium (SW corner of 4th and Grand Avenue). Just below the Hildreth are two thin white layers.
The first, whiter layer are the backs of the Gordon and the Bronx apartments (at 618 and 624 W. 4th Street, respectively) (just visible over the top of the
Gordon can be seen the graceful curve of the façade on the Gibson Apartments on the NE corner of 4th and Hope Streets) and the second, lower, slightly
darker layer is the Grenada Apartment/Hotel with the turreted and crenelated corner (at 419 S. Grand Avenue). Nestled between the Grenada and the
Zelda is the small Victorian cottage of the LeChats (partially obscured by a palm tree) who built the Zelda and graced it with the wife's name. Directly
below the Zelda is the Brown Apartments (another bright, white building, at 414 S. Grand Avenue) where someone has strung a line of laundry out to dry.

Which brings us to a tangle of turrets and gingerbread.
To the immediate right of the Zelda and above and extending to the right of the Brown Apartments is the residence of the noted vintner and horse
breeder, the ill-fated Leonard J. Rose (Mansion) at 400 S. Grand Avenue (SE corner of Grand and 4th Street). By the time of this image, Leonard Rose
has been dead for more than a decade having committed suicide in the rear yard of the mansion because of huge business reversals. The Brunson
Mansion sits behind and slightly to the right of the Rose at 347 S. Grand Avenue (NOT on the corner of 4th Street). We have a relatively clear view of the
Brunson here because we are looking directly across the property vacated by the Hershey Mansion (NE corner of 4th and Grand Avenue) which was
moved down 4th Street and wedged behind the Briggs (the Barbara Worth) Apartments, on the slope above Flower Street, and repurposed as the Castle
Tower Apartments. The Leonard Rose Mansion foreshadows the Brunson, sitting in front and slightly to the left of it. You may distinguish the Rose which
appears darker than the greyish Brunson. The Brunson will be gone in two or three years, demolished to make way for an automobile mechanic's garage.


To the right and across a small open space from the Brunson is the white Fleur-de-Lis Apartments at 333 S. Grand Avenue and next to it is the medium
grey Hotel Kenneth at 325 S. Grand. Directly below the Fleur-de-Lis is the seven story, multi-turreted Fremont Hotel (w/sign) at 401 S. Olive Street (on
the SW corner of 4th and Olive Streets) and next to it on the left is the Olive Street School with the distinctive center capped turret and next to it, again to
the left, is the Hotel Trenton (w/sign) at 427 S. Olive Street.

On the lower left edge, we can see the NE corner (5th and Hill Streets) of Central (Pershing
Square) Park. The street which runs in front of the two large buildings facing the park is 5th Street, of course, the northern border of the park, and Hill
Street is seen running diagonally from the lower edge of the park toward the right (or north). These two large buildings (the smaller four-story building
sandwiched between them was formerly the L.A. Business College and is now Burnett's Dance Hall) are, on the left edge of the image, Clune's Auditorium
at about 427 W. 5th Street (NE corner of 5th and Olive Streets) with a three-story base and three towers (two four-story towers on either side of a
six-story middle tower) and then Burnett's and then the California Club at 459 S. Hill Street (NW corner of 5th and Hill Streets) with a three-story base
and two two-story, hipped roof towers on either side of a roof garden.

As I've noted, the California Club sits on the NW corner of 5th and Hill Streets.
Directly behind the California Club (to the right) is the College Theater (w/sign) at 449 S. Hill Street and next to it can be seen a triangular patch of the flat
roofed Poinserttia Cafeteria (it is a really small part of the roof but it is there) and then, continuing north on Hill Street (to the right) an unidentified
two-story building with a sign reading 'Thos. C. Bundy & Co.' and then the four-story Pacific Electric Club at 433 S. Hill Street, (here sporting a large
'Coca Cola sign presumably generating some advertising revenue for the club) a 'gentlemen's club' for the executives of the P&E. Next to the club,
appropriately enough, can be seen the archway to the 5th Street P&E Station and beyond it the open air 5th Street yard of the P&E. It is on this site that
the subway building will be built and from which the tunnel leading to the Toluca yard (at Glendale and Beverly Boulevards) will be dug, spelling the doom
of the Olive Street School building (although by that time the Health Department will have taken over the building). Beyond the P&E yard is the Blue Bell
Cafeteria (w/sign).

Now we're going all the way back up to the urban horizon very near the center of the image we find the prominent Palace Hotel &
Apartments (w/sign)(it is very similar in size and shape to the Zelda) with a large dark-roofed, white sided stairwell roof-access and the front of the
building is also painted white. The Palace Hotel (formerly the Kellogg) is at 317 S. Olive Street, it is a well-known landmark being across the street and
slightly south of the upper Angels Flight landing at 3rd and Olive. Just below the Palace we can make out the tops of the Ems Apartments' twin,
Spanish-tiled turrets at 321 S. Olive Street. The Ems extends well back from the street, even farther back than the Palace, with it's sides painted white
for the first 1/4 of the building but then the facia is painted a very dark color (maybe even black) so that it looks like two different buildings but it's all the
Ems. Continuing south, we find a large Victorian home next to the Ems and then a vacant lot. Next to the vacant lot is the flat-roofed Olive Inn at 337 S.
Olive, with it's front partially hidden by a curbside tree. And then the peaked, hipped roof of the Hotel Ogden, at 343 S. Olive, with front balconies on every
floor and finally the flat roofed, rather nondescript Van Winkle Apartments at 349 (the Ogden and the Van Winkle will be lost to the Mutual Garage in
1923). There appears to be a horse-drawn delivery wagon passing in front of the Van Winkle.

Across the street from the Van Winkle (to the right of the
horse-drawn wagon and to the right of the telephone pole) we find a three or four-story apartment building with what appear to be balconies which
stretch the length of the building on each floor and go around to the front of the building as well. This little apartment building is called, appropriately
enough, The Porches at 350 S. Olive. Foreshadowing The Porches, below and slightly to the right, is the square corner of an otherwise unseen building,
with a flat, pronounced cornice and a single window with a small balcony. This is the Hotel Antlers at 423 W. 4th Street (on the NW corner of 4th and Clay
Streets).

Now we'll come down here to the Pantages Theater at 534 S. Broadway and notice Clune's Broadway Theater, at 528 S. Broadway, hunkered
down beside it with the huge steel grillwork sign on its roof. The building next door to Clune's is Quinn's Superba Theater (with the Pettebone Co. sign) at
518 S. Broadway.

As I have said before, contemplating a foreshortened view of the city can be daunting if not overwhelming. Consider two buildings
we've already looked at, the Metropolitan Building and the Palace Hotel & Apartments. The visual compression here is enormous, the Palace, the Ems,
the Black Building, the Wright & Callender Building, the Hotel Clark and the Metropolitan Building, a veritable wedding cake of note-worthy buildings. Let's
start at the Palace Hotel (w/sign) on the urban horizon near the center of the image and directly below it the twin, Spanish-tiled turrets of the Ems. Sitting
directly in front of the Palace and to the immediate right of the Ems is what appears to be a large, black, roof-mounted tank (there are actually two of
these tanks). This tank is mounted on the roof of the Black Building (which is paradoxically a white building) at 359 S. Hill Street (NW corner of 4th and Hill
Streets). The Black Building cornice-work is supported by a series of evenly spaced small masonry blocks. You can visually trace this cornice as it appears,
disappears and re-appears from behind various other objects. It, along with the tank(s) and the two, white, roof access shacks, are about all you can see
of the Black Building. The Wright & Callender Building at 401 S. Hill Street (SW corner of 4th and Hill) fairly shouts at us though, what with its roof-top sign,
we have a pretty clear view of the southwest corner of the building as it comes out from behind the Clark and extends beyond the corner of the
Metropolitan Building and can be seen running nearly all the way to ground level (near the mid-point on this corner of the Wright & Callender is where we
can see a single balconied window of the Hotel Antlers). And now the Hotel Clark, which sits directly behind the Metropolitan Building, its south and east
walls showing light grey and nearly windowless, on the corner of the roofline can be seen two decorative 'urns' (one 'touching' the Wright & Callender sign)
and a partial view of a vertical sign reading 'Abso(lu)te(ly fireproof). If you look closely through the supporting structure of the construction crane on the
roof of the Metropolitan Building you can see the words 'Hotel Clark'. The Hotel Clark is nearly brand new in this image, established by our ability to see
The Porches apartment building. The Hotel Clark is going to build a large parking garage next to the Hotel Antlers on the NE corner of 4th and Olive
Streets. Once that is up, we will no longer be able to see The Porches from this angle.

About mid-way down the left edge of the Metropolitan Building we
can see the sign on The Blue Be(ll) cafeteria. Between this sign and the edge of the Metropolitan we can see the partial sign for the Occ(idental) Hotel at
428 S. Hill Street. The Occidental Hotel is next door to the Clark at 418. Interesting sign lower down on the Hotel Paxton (323 W. 5th Street)
saying 'Transient or Permanent'. Good to know.

Now all the way back up to the Palace Hotel & Apartments. To the left of the Palace we have a clear view of the Nugent at 259 S Grand Avenue (NW
corner of 3rd and Grand)with its conically topped turret and three floors of recessed front balconies. To the right of the Palace and a bit further back,
we can see the minareted turret of the Minnewaska topped with a very tall flagpole (later to be called the Dome) at 201 S. Grand Avenue (SW corner
of 2nd and Grand). Farther to the right we can pick out the sign on the Hotel Cumberland at 243 S. Olive Street. The Cumberland sign seems to float
above the New Maryton at 314 S. Olive, which is right across the street from the Palace at 317. To the right of the New Maryton and the Cumberland
is the pyramidically topped solarium of the Astoria at 248 S. Olive and directly above it, so much directly that it seems to rise from it, is the smaller,
dark minaret of the Melrose at 130 S. Grand Avenue. The small white building to the immediate right of the Astoria solarium is the back of the Richelieu
at 142 S. Grand Avenue. And finally, nearer the right edge we have the signs clearly identifying the Hotel Northern at 422 W. 2nd ( SW corner of 2nd
and Clay Streets), the (Young) Women's Christian Association at 253 S. Hill Street and the F.P. Fay Building at 534 W. 3rd Street (SE corner of 3rd
and Hill).



USC digital archive/Title Insurance and Trust, and C.C. Pierce Photography Collection, 1860-1960

Flyingwedge May 15, 2014 5:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MichaelRyerson (Post 6579027)
Stunning view. Jam packed and including the Hildreth, the Leonard Rose and the Brunson, three of the five Bunker Hill 'painted ladies', all in one image. I believe the camera was on the roof of the new Desmond's building at 555 S. Spring Street looking northwest across Mercantile Place (out-of-frame at the bottom) which would ultimately become the Arcade Building. Three highlights from which we can reference other smaller images are, (one) the Pantages Theater (w/sign) center/bottom at 534 S. Broadway, (two) the northeast corner of Central (Pershing Square) Park lower left edge at the SW corner of 5th and S. Hill Streets and (three) the large white building under construction center right is the Metropolitan Building on the NW corner of 5th Street and Broadway. First, the two horizons. One, the Santa Monica Mountains showing through the haze with the highest point (pretty much in the center of the pic) being Mount Lee which will host the Hollywoodland sign in about ten years. And then the second, the urban horizon of houses and buildings, with the Hildreth Mansion (NW corner of 4th and Hope Streets, dark outline near the left edge) and just to the right of the Hildreth, the prominent, squarish Zelda Apartment/Hotel with the distinctive capped rooftop solarium (SW corner of 4th and Grand Avenue). Just below the Hildreth are two thin white layers. The first, whiter layer are the backs of the Gordon and the Bronx apartments (at 618 and 624 W. 4th Street, respectively) (just visible over the top of the Gordon can be seen the graceful curve of the façade on the Gibson Apartments on the NE corner of 4th and Hope Streets) and the second, lower, slightly darker layer is the Grenada Apartment/Hotel with the turreted and crenelated corner (at 419 S. Grand Avenue). Nestled between the Grenada and the Zelda is the small Victorian cottage of the LeChats (partially obscured by a palm tree) who built the Zelda and graced it with the wife's name. Directly below the Zelda is the Brown Apartments (another bright, white building, at 414 S. Grand Avenue). Which brings us to a tangle of turrets and gingerbread. To the immediate right of the Zelda and above and extending to the right of the Brown Apartments is the residence of the noted vintner and horse breeder, the ill-fated Leonard J. Rose (Mansion) at 400 S. Grand Avenue (SE corner of Grand and 4th Street). By the time of this image, Leonard Rose has been dead for more than a decade having committed suicide in the rear yard of the mansion because of huge business reversals. The Brunson Mansion sits behind and slightly to the right of the Rose at 347 S. Grand Avenue (NOT on the corner of 4th Street). We have a relatively clear view of the Brunson here because we are looking directly across the property vacated by the Hershey Mansion (NE corner of 4th and Grand Avenue) which was moved down 4th Street and wedged behind the Briggs (the Barbara Worth) Apartments, on the slope above Flower Street, and repurposed as the Castle Tower Apartments. The Leonard Rose Mansion foreshadows the Brunson, sitting in front and slightly to the left of it. You may distinguish the Rose which appears darker than the greyish Brunson. The Brunson will be gone in two or three years, demolished to make way for an automobile mechanic's garage. To the right and across a small open space from the Brunson is the white Fleur-de-Lis Apartments at 333 S. Grand Avenue and next to it is the medium grey Hotel Kenneth at 325 S. Grand. Directly below the Fleur-de-Lis is the seven story, multi-turreted Fremont Hotel (w/sign) at 401 S. Olive Street (on the SW corner of 4th and Olive Streets) and next to it on the left is the Olive Street School with the distinctive center capped turret and next to it, again to the left, is the Hotel Trenton (w/sign) at 427 S. Olive Street. On the lower left edge, we can see the NE corner (5th and Hill Streets) of Central (Pershing Square) Park. The street which runs in front of the two large buildings facing the park is 5th Street, of course, the northern border of the park, and Hill Street is seen running diagonally from the lower edge of the park toward the right (or north). These two large buildings (the smaller four-story building sandwiched between them was formerly the L.A. Business College and is now Burnett's Dance Hall) are, on the left edge of the image, Clune's Auditorium at about 427 W. 5th Street (NE corner of 5th and Olive Streets) with a three-story base and three towers (two four-story towers on either side of a six-story middle tower) and then Burnett's and then the California Club at 459 S. Hill Street (NW corner of 5th and Hill Streets) with a three-story base and two two-story, hipped roof towers on either side of a roof garden. As I've noted, the California Club sits on the NW corner of 5th and Hill Streets. Directly behind the California Club (to the right) is the College Theater (w/sign) at 449 S. Hill Street and next to it can be seen a triangular patch of the flat roofed Poinserttia Cafeteria (it is a really small part of the roof but it is there) and then, continuing north on Hill Street (to the right) an unidentified two-story building with a sign reading 'Thos. C. Bundy & Co.' and then the four-story Pacific Electric Club at 433 S. Hill Street, (here sporting a large 'Coca Cola sign presumably generating some advertising revenue for the club) a 'gentlemen's club' for the executives of the P&E. Next to the club, appropriately enough, can be seen the archway to the 5th Street P&E Station and beyond it the open air 5th Street yard of the P&E. It is on this site that the subway building will be built and from which the tunnel leading to the Toluca yard (at Glendale and Beverly Boulevards) will be dug, spelling the doom of the Olive Street School building (although by that time the Health Department will have taken over the building). Beyond the P&E yard is the Blue Bell Cafeteria (w/sign). Now we're going all the way back up to the urban horizon very near the center of the image we find the prominent Palace Hotel & Apartments (w/sign)(it is very similar in size and shape to the Zelda) with a large dark-roofed, white sided stairwell roof-access and the front of the building is also painted white. The Palace Hotel (formerly the Kellogg) is at 317 S. Olive Street, it is a well-known landmark being across the street and slightly south of the upper Angels Flight landing at 3rd and Olive. Just below the Palace we can make out the tops of the Ems Apartments' twin, Spanish-tiled turrets at 321 S. Olive Street. The Ems extends well back from the street, even farther back than the Palace, with it's sides painted white for the first 1/4 of the building but then the facia is painted a very dark color (maybe even black) so that it looks like two different buildings but it's all the Ems. Continuing south, we find a large Victorian home next to the Ems and then a vacant lot. Next to the vacant lot is the flat-roofed Olive Inn at 337 S. Olive, with it's front partially hidden by a curbside tree. And then the peaked, hipped roof of the Hotel Ogden, at 343 S. Olive, with front balconies on every floor and finally the flat roofed, rather nondescript Van Winkle Apartments at 349 (the Ogden and the Van Winkle will be lost to the Mutual Garage in 1923). There appears to be a horse-drawn delivery wagon passing in front of the Van Winkle. Across the street from the Van Winkle (to the right of the horse-drawn wagon and to the right of the telephone pole) we find a three or four-story apartment building with what appear to be balconies which stretch the length of the building on each floor and go around to the front of the building as well. This little apartment building is called, appropriately enough, The Porches at 350 S. Olive. Foreshadowing The Porches, below and slightly to the right, is the square corner of an otherwise unseen building, with a flat, pronounced cornice and a single window with a small balcony. This is the Hotel Antlers at 423 W. 4th Street (on the NW corner of 4th and Clay Streets). Now we'll come down here to the Pantages Theater at 534 S. Broadway and notice Clune's Broadway Theater, at 528 S. Broadway, hunkered down beside it with the huge steel grillwork sign on its roof. The building next door to Clune's is Quinn's Superba Theater (with the Pettebone Co. sign) at 518 S. Broadway. As I have said before, contemplating a foreshortened view of the city can be daunting if not overwhelming. Consider two buildings we've already looked at, the Metropolitan Building and the Palace Hotel & Apartments. The visual compression here is enormous, the Palace, the Ems, the Black Building, the Wright & Callender Building, the Hotel Clark and the Metropolitan Building, a veritable wedding cake of note-worthy buildings. Let's start at the Palace Hotel (w/sign) on the urban horizon near the center of the image and directly below it the twin, Spanish-tiled turrets of the Ems. Sitting directly in front of the Palace and to the immediate right of the Ems is what appears to be a large, black, roof-mounted tank (there are actually two of these tanks). This tank is mounted on the roof of the Black Building (which is paradoxically a white building) at 359 S. Hill Street (NW corner of 4th and Hill Streets). The Black Building cornice-work is supported by a series of evenly spaced small masonry blocks. You can visually trace this cornice as it appears, disappears and re-appears from behind various other objects. It, along with the tank(s) and the two, white, roof access shacks, are about all you can see of the Black Building. The Wright & Callender Building at 401 S. Hill Street (SW corner of 4th and Hill) fairly shouts at us though, what with its roof-top sign, we have a pretty clear view of the southwest corner of the building as it comes out from behind the Clark and extends beyond the corner of the Metropolitan Building and can be seen running nearly all the way to ground level (near the mid-point on this corner of the Wright & Callender is where we can see a single balconied window of the Hotel Antlers). And now the Hotel Clark, which sits directly behind the Metropolitan Building, its south and east walls showing light grey and nearly windowless, on the corner of the roofline can be seen two decorative 'urns' (one 'touching' the Wright & Callender sign) and a partial view of a vertical sign reading 'Abso(lu)te(ly fireproof). If you look closely through the supporting structure of the construction crane on the roof of the Metropolitan Building you can see the words 'Hotel Clark'. The Hotel Clark is nearly brand new in this image, established by our ability to see The Porches apartment building. The Hotel Clark is going to build a large parking garage next to the Hotel Antlers on the NE corner of 4th and Olive Streets. Once that is up, we will no longer be able to see The Porches from this angle. About mid-way down the left edge of the Metropolitan Building we can see the sign on The Blue Be(ll) cafeteria. Between this sign and the edge of the Metropolitan we can see the partial sign for the Occ(idental) Hotel at 428 S. Hill Street. The Occidental Hotel is next door to the Clark at 418. Interesting sign lower down on the Hotel Paxton (323 W. 5th Street) saying 'Transient or Permanent'. Good to know. Now all the way back up to the Palace Hotel & Apartments. To the left of the Palace we have a clear view of the Nugent with its conically topped turret and three floors of recessed front balconies. To the right of the Palace and a bit further back, we can see the minareted turret of the Minnewaska topped with a very tall flagpole (later to be called the Dome) at 201 S. Grand Avenue (SW corner of 2nd and Grand). Farther to the right we can pick out the sign on the Hotel Cumberland at 243 S. Olive Street. The Cumberland sign seems to float above the New Maryton at 314 S. Olive, which is right across the street from the Palace at 317. To the right of the New Maryton and the Cumberland is the pyramidically topped solarium of the Astoria at 248 S. Olive and directly above it, so much directly that it seems to rise from it, is the smaller, dark minaret of the Melrose at 130 S. Grand Avenue. The small white building to the immediate right of the Astoria solarium is the back of the Richelieu at 142 S. Grand Avenue. And finally, nearer the right edge we have the signs clearly identifying the Hotel Northern at 422 W. 2nd ( SW corner of 2nd and Clay Streets), the (Young) Women's Christian Association at 253 S. Hill Street and the F.P. Fay Building at 534 W. 3rd Street (SE corner of 3rd and Hill).


USC digital archive/Title Insurance and Trust, and C.C. Pierce Photography Collection, 1860-1960

I know this is great info, MR, and thanks so much for taking the time to lay it all out! But since we have to scroll to get to the end of each line,
and since there are 42 lines in your single paragraph, what you've written is very hard to read.

MichaelRyerson May 15, 2014 5:41 PM

.

Flyingwedge May 15, 2014 6:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MichaelRyerson (Post 6579229)
Short answer, 'into every life a little rain must fall'. Longer comment, yes, I considered the sheer weight of it. I can leave it, I can delete it, or I'm open to suggestions. bear in mind if I reduce the image, the detail necessary to make the text meaningful is lost. If I post the original image size the scrolling will be multiplied by a factor of 2.5. What's your pleasure? By the way, I did not disassemble the image for the forum, it was meant for my photo-stream where I feel a responsibility to notate as many buildings as possible so that the image will show up in subsequent searches for that building.

I'm not saying you wrote too much, I'm just suggesting that you reformat it so it's not difficult to read.

The image seems a good size as-is, and, admittedly, inserting a hard return at the end of each line to shorten its length would be a hassle.

But I think breaking your single 2,251-word paragraph into several paragraphs would go a long way toward making what you wrote more reader-friendly.

MichaelRyerson May 15, 2014 6:24 PM

.

MichaelRyerson May 15, 2014 6:26 PM

.

ethereal_reality May 15, 2014 9:06 PM

noirish looking press credentials.

1935
http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/800...0/836/kjf5.jpg

reverse
http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/800...0/837/o4fs.jpg


same reporter, 10 years later. -1945
http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/800.../838/diwhe.jpg

reverse
http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/800.../841/7h2qt.jpg

Both press passes were found on ebay.


Astonishing amount of information MichaelRyerson. Thanks for sharing your knowledge with us. :)
__

ethereal_reality May 15, 2014 9:17 PM

California Limited derailment, 1945

http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/xq90/844/5ymo.jpg
http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/102...0/839/jmz2.jpgebay
__

ethereal_reality May 15, 2014 9:24 PM

Smogtown 1954

http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/xq90/843/qcky.jpg
ebay

-We've seen smog pictures before, but I believe this is a new one to NLA.

KevinW May 15, 2014 9:27 PM

Reformat
 
I like the reformat. Great info MichaelR!

Graybeard May 15, 2014 9:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 6579616)
noirish looking press credentials.

1935
http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/800...0/836/kjf5.jpg

reverse
http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/800...0/837/o4fs.jpg


same reporter, 10 years later. -1945
http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/800.../838/diwhe.jpg

reverse
http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/800.../841/7h2qt.jpg

Both press passes were found on ebay.


Astonishing amount of information MichaelRyerson. Thanks for sharing your knowledge with us. :)
__

The years were not kind to Mr. Cantonwine, :shrug:

ethereal_reality May 15, 2014 9:47 PM

Atherton Villa Apts. Burbank. Is anyone familiar with this fine looking building?

http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/800...0/835/bfkl.jpgebay

postmarked 1921
__

Lorendoc May 15, 2014 10:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MichaelRyerson (Post 6579027)
https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2923/...ca51de13_k.jpgView looking northwest across Central Park and the southern slope of Bunker Hill, ca.1912


USC digital archive/Title Insurance and Trust, and C.C. Pierce Photography Collection, 1860-1960

I agree, stunning would cover it. Thank you MR for the annotations, which appeared broken into paragraphs just fine on my screen. I had no trouble reading it.

AND...in the lower left corner of the photo is (I think) 535 S. Broadway, which we discussed as the neighbor of the Milton Hotel a few pages back. (otoh, the 1915-8 CDs show the brothers Feinberg at 640 S. Broadway).

HossC May 15, 2014 10:24 PM

MichaelRyerson, while I'm glad that every picture here isn't as large as the one you posted earlier, when they do turn up, they're a real treat. Thank you for posting it. With regard to the accompanying text, I saw it before and after reformatting, and it's much easier to read now. It's very easy to post images here and assume that the picture tells the story, but that doesn't help when someone later tries to search for it. I've noticed the same problem at resources like the USCDL - some pictures have descriptions that name every building and advertisement while others barely include the location. Extra info certainly helps me to find what I want. Just my 2 cents :).

On a related subject: one of the buildings in your picture is the Hotel Trenton at 427 S Olive. I don't think we've seen this colorized image before.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...entonColor.jpg
eBay

CityBoyDoug May 15, 2014 10:55 PM

106 degrees F. in Los Angeles today.....
 
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v4...psa1333c90.jpg
USC collection

1938 Some Shirley Temple curls...

Children eating ice cream in the Mile High Ice Cream Parlor on Crenshaw Boulevard, Los Angeles. On the counter itself can be seen a napkin holder, straw jar, sugar dispenser, salt shaker, bagged peanut display rack. Attached to the counter is a drinking fountain. On the shelf behind the counter can be seen a coffee maker, malt and shake mixers, etc.

ethereal_reality May 15, 2014 11:52 PM

Oddity

Take a look at this soul-destroying intersection in East Los Angeles. (could this be the largest single level intersection in L.A?)

http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/102...0/835/sym8.jpg
google_earth




On the right, between Goodrich Blvd. and Ferguson Drive there's this........thing.
http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/102...0/844/0tnj.jpg
GSV

At first I thought it was a 1950s art deco knock off. Then I noticed the small bit of classical ornamentation (stone garland/wreath). Hmmm...what the heck is going here?




And the monumental entrance is even more strange when compared to the rest of the modest and single story building.

http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/102...0/834/b8fx.jpg
google_earth




modest to say the least
http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/800...0/837/fx7n.jpg

I was hoping someone on the thread might be familiar with this area and know the history of this building. It's been bugging me
ever since I came across it a week or so ago.
__

ENKI, East L.A. Mental Health Services

one last look.
http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/800.../843/uwabs.jpg

HossC May 15, 2014 11:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 6578338)

The 700 block of S. Hobart Avenue

http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/102.../835/53uk4.jpg
google_earth

Have you ever wondered what is lost when a block is overrun with cookie-cutter apartments?

If only they'd built apartments in the first place, they might still be there:

Armitage Apartments, 545 South Hobart Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA, 1929.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...AArmitage1.jpg
USC Digital Library

The same apartments in 1930.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...AArmitage2.jpg
USC Digital Library

Interior shot. From the shape of the windows, I'd guess this is the first floor.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...AArmitage3.jpg
USC Digital Library

The Armitage is now known as Hobart Plaza. I wonder who thought that removing the decorative details, filling in some of the windows, and placing a large metal box outside was an improvement?

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...4.jpg~original
GSV

Nearly opposite the Armitage, there's another apartment building at 532 S Hobart. GW posted about it here.

In 1928, these apartments were being constructed at 920 S Hobart. Given the address, it's no surprise that USC lists the client as the Henry De Roulet Co.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...20SHobart1.jpg
USC Digital Library

I bet the color isn't original!

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...20SHobart2.jpg
GSV


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