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Flyingwedge Jan 20, 2020 12:13 AM

https://i1165.photobucket.com/albums...a.jpg~original


I'd guess that the fruit and vegetable stand was on the NE corner of Western Avenue and Imperial Hwy., then known as
114th St. The smaller sign at the top appears to have "Los Angeles" under its left-facing arrow, which must point north.
I think I can make out "Torrance" and "Redondo Beach," to the south, just above the right-facing arrow.

From Western and Imperial, it's about a mile east to Vermont and 1/2 mile west to the Belle View Country Club, as it's
called on the 1930 Inglewood USGS Map below (about where Van Ness is now). The north/south streets at the left and
right sides below are Prairie and Western, respectively. Cypress Avenue, the middle north/south street, must now be
Crenshaw. Just to the left of Cypress near the map's center, 114th Street is marked:

https://i1165.photobucket.com/albums...l.jpg~original

old file probably from US Geological Survey website

Bristolian Jan 20, 2020 4:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HossC (Post 8804924)
:previous:

The Bellevue Golf Course made it onto this 1932 tourist map. I notice that the word "Public" is missing from its title, but I assume it's the same place.

https://i809.photobucket.com/albums/...1.jpg~original
www.historicmapworks.com

Further south on this map, Royal Palms Country Club can be seen just above the Point Firmin Lighthouse.

https://i.imgur.com/TMxLzV1.png?1

Interesting account and photo essay here: https://www.avoidingregret.com/2014/...for-royal.html

Despite being a casualty of the depression and closing in 1933, some remnants have survived

https://i.imgur.com/jo3WIX5.jpg?1
https://i.imgur.com/wpqL0yJ.jpg?1

Bristolian Jan 20, 2020 6:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Flyingwedge (Post 8805025)
https://i1165.photobucket.com/albums...a.jpg~original


I'd guess that the fruit and vegetable stand was on the NE corner of Western Avenue and Imperial Hwy., then known as
114th St. The smaller sign at the top appears to have "Los Angeles" under its left-facing arrow, which must point north.
I think I can make out "Torrance" and "Redondo Beach," to the south, just above the right-facing arrow.

From Western and Imperial, it's about a mile east to Vermont and 1/2 mile west to the Belle View Country Club, as it's
called on the 1930 Inglewood USGS Map below (about where Van Ness is now). The north/south streets at the left and
right sides below are Prairie and Western, respectively. Cypress Avenue, the middle north/south street, must now be
Crenshaw. Just to the left of Cypress near the map's center, 114th Street is marked:

https://i1165.photobucket.com/albums...l.jpg~original

old file probably from US Geological Survey website

I have found a 1928 aerial showing Bellevue Public Golf Course.

https://i.imgur.com/IuYz4G5.png?1UCSB Aerials Flight C_300, Frame K-130

Imperial or 114th st. runs left to right across the center of the frame and Western Avenue runs up and down the right side. A little figuring confirms the course to be about 1/2 mile west of Western. Curiously, there are holes both north and south of 114th st.
The fruit stand is too small to show up under magnification but there does appear to be something there at the NE corner of Western & 114th.

CityBoyDoug Jan 20, 2020 7:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bristolian (Post 8805244)
I have found a 1928 aerial showing Bellevue Public Golf Course.



Imperial or 114th st. runs left to right across the center of the frame and Western Avenue runs up and down the right side. A little figuring confirms the course to be about 1/2 mile west of Western. Curiously, there are holes both north and south of 114th st.
The fruit stand is too small to show up under magnification but there does appear to be something there at the NE corner of Western & 114th.

Good find Bristol.....your aerial view is key to finding just where the Fruit Stand was located. The old Topographical view is also instructive in defining the terrain. Yes, that red dot appears to show where the clubhouse was located. Even the ravines and gullies match the aerial.

nadeau Jan 20, 2020 9:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bristolian (Post 8805244)
I have found a 1928 aerial showing Bellevue Public Golf Course.

https://i.imgur.com/IuYz4G5.png?1UCSB Aerials Flight C_300, Frame K-130

Imperial or 114th st. runs left to right across the center of the frame and Western Avenue runs up and down the right side. A little figuring confirms the course to be about 1/2 mile west of Western. Curiously, there are holes both north and south of 114th st.
The fruit stand is too small to show up under magnification but there does appear to be something there at the NE corner of Western & 114th.

When I compared the USGS to the aerial, I’d thought the land to the west of the golf course was crops, but now I see they are streets.

bboyelsereno Jan 21, 2020 3:35 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by nadeau (Post 8804398)
Mystery location: (Since we’re looking at Silver Lake) Reprinted by seller, described as Silver Lake 1964. The cars and the hillside stairway might make that seem right, but the aerials from 1965 don’t show any matching undeveloped hills with stairs. The distant mountains in the center right edge are also a reasonable match for Silver Lake area.

https://i.postimg.cc/gkzcYbk8/1-ECFB...-D27607779.jpg

Source: https://www.ebay.com/itm/Vintage-196...rdt=true&rt=nc

I've been reading/browsing this thread for the last few years... Had to respond to this pick. Its actually El Sereno. Looks like it was taken from the backyard of the house across the street from mine. Cool pick. I recognized that hill the moment I saw it. If I can figure out how to post pics, Ill post one from how it looks today. Thanks

nadeau Jan 21, 2020 5:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bboyelsereno (Post 8806139)
I've been reading/browsing this thread for the last few years... Had to respond to this pick. Its actually El Sereno. Looks like it was taken from the backyard of the house across the street from mine. Cool pick. I recognized that hill the moment I saw it. If I can figure out how to post pics, Ill post one from how it looks today. Thanks

Thanks, bboy! I knew someone in here would know.

BillinGlendaleCA Jan 21, 2020 5:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bboyelsereno (Post 8806139)
I've been reading/browsing this thread for the last few years... Had to respond to this pick. Its actually El Sereno. Looks like it was taken from the backyard of the house across the street from mine. Cool pick. I recognized that hill the moment I saw it. If I can figure out how to post pics, Ill post one from how it looks today. Thanks

That's it! Here's the view from the Ascot Hills.
https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/...c4dedaaa_c.jpg_1180006.jpg by BillinGlendaleCA, on Flickr

Lwize Jan 21, 2020 9:44 PM

https://flashbak.com/wp-content/uplo...4-1200x816.jpg
(flashbak.com/pinterest)

Ed Ruscha’s 1966 Photos of the Sunset Strip

Quote:

Originally Posted by flashbak.com
Nearly everything about the Los Angeles appealed to him—the endless sprawl, the two-story apartment houses with outdoor stairways, the hot rods, the jazz clubs, the billboards, the sunrises and sunsets, the boulevards that led to the ocean.

When Pop artist Ed Ruscha moved to L.A. from Oklahoma City in 1956 to attend the Chouinard Institute (later CalArts), he soon became part of a vanguard of modern art in the city. L.A. was “largely oblivious of the visual arts,” writes Calvin Tomkins at The New Yorker. “Unlike San Francisco, which considered itself the cultural capital of the West, L.A. had no significant art museum, few galleries, and only a handful of people who would even think of buying contemporary art.”

Aside of a small “crop of obstreperous young artists” like Ruscha, the dearth of new art in the city would obtain until the mid-sixties, when the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) opened on Wilshire Boulevard, and smaller, more avant-garde galleries followed. (Ruscha would later paint the LACMA going up in flames in his Los Angeles County Museum of Art on Fire.)

But Ruscha was never lacking for inspiration in L.A. He found all he needed in the city itself—in the quirks of its architecture, the graphic simplicity of advertising, the “cinematic perspectives” of Hollywood films….

Nearly everything about the city appealed to him—the endless sprawl, the two-story apartment houses with outdoor stairways, the hot rods, the jazz clubs, the billboards, the sunrises and sunsets, the boulevards that led to the ocean.

In 1966, the year after LACMA opened, Ruscha published Every Building on the Sunset Strip, a series of black and white photographs of the storefronts, restaurants, hotels, apartments, and palm trees lining both sides of Sunset Boulevard. “He stitched the photos together to make one long book that folded out to 27 feet,” notes filmmaker Matthew Miller—who has brought together two of Ruscha’s major inspirations, L.A. and Jack Kerouac’s On the Road, in a short film commissioned by the Getty.

“He made copious notes over that time in an effort to standardize the process,” Miller writes, “covering everything from the height of the camera to details like ‘Protect the photog’s ribcage with a lifebelt or jacket.’” Every Building on the Sunset Strip turned into Ruscha’s “larger Streets of Los Angeles series, which spanned decades” and included his book Some Los Angeles Apartments: “38 deadpan photos of high-rises, walk-ups and dingbat buildings that typify that era of architecture,” notes NPR.

Thanks in part to Ruscha himself, by the mid-sixties, when he began his odyssey of L.A. photography, the city had “supplanted San Francisco as the West Coast center for contemporary art,” writes Tomkins. Indeed, by the later part of the decade, “Los Angeles was poised to rival and maybe surpass New York as the new art mecca,” though this didn’t quite happen.

Ruscha continued to pursue his own course. His sensibility is may best be illustrated by the story of a month he spent in Paris during a 1961 tour of Europe after his graduation from Chouinard. “Although he made dutiful visits to museums, older art didn’t interest him. He spent most of his time walking the streets and painting small pictures, with oil on paper, of signs.”

https://flashbak.com/ed-ruschas-1966...t-strip-423046

Earl Boebert Jan 21, 2020 10:24 PM

I stumbled across this in an unrelated search, and thought it might be of interest. The original document is in the Library of Congress:

https://www.loc.gov/resource/dcmsiab...nd/?st=gallery

In 1921, before there was Google maps and Siri to guide you, there was this:

http://www.boebertandblossom.com/LANoir/Cand1.jpg

An "Auto-Gram" was the paper equivalent of a directions overlay on a digital map. First, they gave you schematics on how to get through town. Note Los Angeles:

http://www.boebertandblossom.com/LANoir/Cand2.jpg

Then, they gave schematics on getting from town to town:

http://www.boebertandblossom.com/LANoir/Cand3.jpg

So 23 Skiddoo and Oh You Kid; grab your book of Auto-Grams, crank up the old Tin Lizzie, and head for ... wherever.

Cheers,

Earl

BillinGlendaleCA Jan 21, 2020 11:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Earl Boebert (Post 8806991)
I stumbled across this in an unrelated search, and thought it might be of interest. The original document is in the Library of Congress:

https://www.loc.gov/resource/dcmsiab...nd/?st=gallery

In 1921, before there was Google maps and Siri to guide you, there was this:


An "Auto-Gram" was the paper equivalent of a directions overlay on a digital map. First, they gave you schematics on how to get through town. Note Los Angeles:



Then, they gave schematics on getting from town to town:


So 23 Skiddoo and Oh You Kid; grab your book of Auto-Grams, crank up the old Tin Lizzie, and head for ... wherever.

Cheers,

Earl

When my family would take long car trips in the 70's, we'd get TripTiks from the Auto Club. They looked a lot like the schematics of going town to town. I think I still have some of them.

CityBoyDoug Jan 21, 2020 11:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Lwize (Post 8806923)
https://flashbak.com/wp-content/uplo...4-1200x816.jpg
(flashbak.com/pinterest)

Ed Ruscha’s 1966 Photos of the Sunset Strip



https://flashbak.com/ed-ruschas-1966...t-strip-423046

Rusha, now 82 years old is a perfect example of someone who is not an artist can make millions by pretending to be one.

A great book about this is:https://pictures.abebooks.com/isbn/9780553225617-us.jpg

Wolfe's thesis in The Painted Word was that by the 1970s, modern art had moved away from being a visual experience, and more often was an illustration of art critics' theories.

This book explains why modern art is actually a scam created by art dealers, critics and people without genuine artistic skills.

Lwize Jan 21, 2020 11:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CityBoyDoug (Post 8807044)
Rusha, now 82 years old is a perfect example of someone who is not an artist can make millions by pretending to be one.

A great book about this is:[img]book picture[/img]

Wolfe's thesis in The Painted Word was that by the 1970s, modern art had moved away from being a visual experience, and more often was an illustration of art critics' theories.

This book explains why modern art is actually a scam created by art dealers, critics and people without genuine artistic skills.

"Art" is subjective to the point of being beyond criticism.

There is neither good art nor bad art. There is simply art.

Ruscha was/is an artist.

MartinTurnbull Jan 22, 2020 3:04 AM

The old Harvey House at Union Station, downtown Los Angeles
 
This past weekend was the first time I passed through Union Station since the old Harvey House restaurant was relaunched as the Western Imperial Beer Company. I know we usually post vintage photos here but I thought perhaps members who don't live in LA might like to see them.

https://martinturnbull.com/wp-conten.../IMG_3637.jpeg

https://martinturnbull.com/wp-conten...1/IMG_3640.jpg

It still looks great.
https://martinturnbull.com/wp-conten...1/IMG_3638.jpg

ethereal_reality Jan 22, 2020 6:53 AM

This just showed up on eBay.


mystery street, Los Angeles 35mm slide 1965.

https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1...924/YdObso.jpg
eBay

Has anyone heard of the Palace Market? :shrug:


.

BillinGlendaleCA Jan 22, 2020 8:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 8807463)
This just showed up on eBay.


mystery street, Los Angeles 35mm slide 1965.

https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1...924/YdObso.jpg
eBay

Palace Market. :shrug:


.

The highway signs are the clue, 79 and 74 only coincide for a short distance and the only area that would have that much retail is Hemet.

I think this is probably the Palace Market:
https://i.postimg.cc/NLhQwcQP/Annota...-22-001519.jpgvia GSV
It's at 400 E. Florida Ave., Hemet City Hall is now across the street.

While I was writing this up, we had a small shaker here in the southland.

ethereal_reality Jan 22, 2020 8:22 AM

.

And here's another mystery location.

Has anyone heard of the 'Birch Hill Oil Field'?

https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1...921/saBOAy.jpg
eBay no longer listed



The reverse is blank except for some black stuck to it from a photo album.

https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/6...921/yZIFNK.jpg

The back is undevided which usually means pre-1910.




I belive there's a sign on the roof of the building shown below.

https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1...922/wepB5A.jpg
detail

For all I know it probably says 'Birch Hill Oil Field'. . .which woouldn't help us one bit.

Are those bird houses?

.

odinthor Jan 22, 2020 2:19 PM

:previous:

https://i.postimg.cc/d33rQYKz/Birch-Hill-LAT3-25-26.jpg
LA Times, 3/25/1926, via ProQuest, via CSULB Library

As far as I can find, the name only comes up around 1926, so it seems to have been a very fleeting name for the locale...

HossC Jan 22, 2020 2:27 PM

:previous:

I found a higher resolution version of the postcard in the Orange County Archives' flickr gallery. The same archive also has this similar image which is titled "Oil Camp, Brea Cal." The roof sign appears to say "General Petroleum Corp."

https://i809.photobucket.com/albums/...BirchHill2.jpg
Orange County Archives on flickr

Another image shows a mildly colorized postcard with a wider angle which is headed "Oil Wells on Birch Hill near Brea Cal."

https://i809.photobucket.com/albums/...BirchHill3.jpg
Orange County Archives on flickr

AlvaroLegido Jan 22, 2020 6:39 PM

Lwize vs CBD
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Lwize (Post 8807099)
"Art" is subjective to the point of being beyond criticism.

There is neither good art nor bad art. There is simply art.

Ruscha was/is an artist.

Lwize's point of view looks like the enlighted and expert one and I would like to reach his height… but I think like CBD : it has become a scam… most of the time. It must be somewhat objective to last centuries like, say, the Giaconda.
The time is the objectivity of the art.


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