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ethereal_reality Aug 28, 2014 7:46 PM

:previous:Oh it's so great to see the old Villa Carlotta again pwrof3. How can one apartment contain so much 'noirish'ment. I love every inch of it.


It's amazing that regal buildings like the Los Angeles National Bank stood for only twenty years, and yet our little 'chophouse' at 1st & Vermont endures.

originally posted by HossC
http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/xq90/538/tikwPf.jpg
GSV

Is that guy on the right throwing up his teriyake?

__



This streetcar photo was labeled "Pacific Blvd".
http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/xq90/743/48WSNA.jpg
ebay

-note the large SWIFT sign in the distance on the left.
__

ethereal_reality Aug 28, 2014 8:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HossC (Post 6708313)
What did we say about properly captioning pictures? :brickwall:

Handy if you want a picture of 1937, perhaps. ;)

Is this better HossC?

1937
http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/xq90/909/5QxBhJ.jpg
ebay

LOS ANGELES, CALIF. Eng. Co. 3
2000 g.p.m. 1937 Am. LaF duplex pumper
(Runs with Manifold Wagon)


Thanks for the additional information on the American LaFrance firetruck CBD and Loyalton. (and for answering what a PW is Loyalton)
-and I think MichaelRyerson is correct, that's probably the 6th Street Bridge.


posted by MR
http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/xq90/745/P7x91d.jpg
usc

So who owned that broad swath of empty land back then....the city?...the railroads?

__

ethereal_reality Aug 28, 2014 8:42 PM

Los Angeles -I'm guessing late 1940s or early1950 (the building appears much more modern than the cars)

http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/102...673/sSwXfl.jpg
ebay

So where is this? I've googled Metropolitan Federal to no avail.

plus- At first glance I thought those diagonal criss-crossed lines were lighting effects from the lens of the photographer, but now as I look closer
I think they're actually part of the facade. If so, that's a very unique design element, especially for this time period.
__

ethereal_reality Aug 28, 2014 9:22 PM

a before & after

http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/xq90/745/iJad18.jpg
ebay



The 74th Street School today. :( -quite a disappointment.
http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/102...912/EU84Pb.jpg
GSV

-maybe there's a chance I have the wrong school.
__

ethereal_reality Aug 28, 2014 10:00 PM

http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/640...538/WI2Kgf.jpg

Quote:

Originally Posted by Beaudry (Post 6708794)
Oh yeah, that's 336 S Bunker Hill Ave. Not very photographed, because it was across from the Salt Box, so everyone had their backs turned to it while snapping the Salt Box and Castle on the odd side of the street.

Thanks for identifying the house in the snapshot I posted yesterday Beaudry.

Here's another photograph, also dated July 1963 that I had overlooked earlier. It's the same seller so it was probably taken the same day
by the same photographer.


Angels Flight 1963

http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/640...540/2I8EvU.jpg
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Orig-1963-Bu...item33943911b2

enlargement
http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/xq90/540/LkjwTT.jpg
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Orig-1963-Bu...item33943911b2

__

HossC Aug 28, 2014 10:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 6709811)

http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/xq90/745/iJad18.jpg
ebay

The 74th Street School today. :( -quite a disappointment.

-maybe there's a chance I have the wrong school.

I think you have the right school. This is an aerial view of the same area from 1954. The 1972 view shows the same main building with a few extra small buildings within the perimeter, probably to increase capacity, but the current building is there by 1980.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...School1954.jpg
Historic Aerials

ethereal_reality Aug 28, 2014 10:55 PM

CBD or Loyalton, do you happen to know the make of this firetruck? (circa 1942)
It has some of the same curved lines as the American LaFrance.

originally posted by Handsome Stranger
http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/800...661/AmRJci.jpg


Here's the link to HS's original post showing truck, as well as fire station #43.
http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...postcount=9793

__

HossC Aug 28, 2014 11:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 6709732)

Los Angeles -I'm guessing late 1940s or early1950 (the building appears much more modern than the cars)

http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/102...673/sSwXfl.jpg
ebay

So where is this? I've googled Metropolitan Federal to no avail.

plus- At first glance I thought those diagonal criss-crossed lines were lighting effects from the lens of the photographer, but now as I look closer
I think they're actually part of the facade. If so, that's a very unique design element, especially for this time period.

I searched the City Directories, but only found the Metropolitan Federal Savings and Loan at an address of 612 S Spring in the 1938, 1939 and 1942 editions. Then I went to look for the original postcard on eBay, and found the address on the back. It's 818 Wilshire Boulevard. I went back to check the CDs, and found the company listed as Metropolitan Savings & Loan or just Metropolitan Savings from 1956 to 1969.

With my extra information, I Googled some more, and found a great set interior and exterior pictures taken in daylight in 1949, complete with criss-cross decoration. One of the property sites I looked at gave a build date on 1948 (so your guess was spot on, e_r). There are seven pictures in the set, I've just picked two. It's called Job 394: Stiles Oliver Clements, Metropolitan Federal Savings (Los Angeles, Calif.), 1949.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...1.jpg~original
rosettaapp.getty.edu

This is the view over the reception area, facing the front of the building.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...2.jpg~original
rosettaapp.getty.edu

The same reception area with a bit a color.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...3.jpg~original
eBay

Although the building still stands, it's had a makeover :(. By a strange coincidence, there's now a neon sign in the window advertising teriyaki!

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...4.jpg~original
GSV

3940dxer Aug 29, 2014 12:25 AM

Pigeon Farm revisited, LAPD Academy
 
Forum member Lorendoc and enjoyed another exploration -- this one was a bit closer to home, in Elysian Park.

The priority on my wish list was snagging a "now" version of this undated Pigeon Farm photo from the USC site, an early topic on NLA. The farm was built in 1892 and was destroyed in February 1914 when a heavy Pacific storm hit the city, engorging the L.A. River and sweeping the coops towards the ocean. Popular Science Monthly wrote "Tens of thousands of birds were drowned. The few survivors hovered about their former home for weeks -- some of them for months; but they could not be brought together as a family again, and finally they scattered."

This area views fascinates me because it is home to so much essential infrastructure and communications and as Lorendoc remarked that day, it has all been dictated by geography, and the lay of the land. The river (whose headwaters lie north in the San Fernando valley) follows a gentle, nearly level southerly course to Long Beach. (Some accounts state that in the early 19th century the river joined ballon a Creek, emptying into Santa Monica Bay. A large flood in 1825 moved the river to its present course.) The Arroyo watercourse joins L.A. River just south of this location. The level course of the river and the water it provided led to development along its banks. From Downtown L.A. this was an easier though slightly longer route to the San Fernando Valley, San Francisco, Sacramento, etc., versus the Cahuenga Pass. L.A.'s north/south railway line follows the banks of the river, as does San Fernando Road, the original route to the Valley.

The channelization of the river and development in the valleys and hills have brought many changes since the Pigeon Farm days. I's interesting to see what remains, and what has changed. In the older photo the Farm occupies a prominent (but unprotected!) bulge along the left bank. The railroad tracks to the east of the Farm were the way north and west from DTLA, and points east and south.

The several block long street behind the farm nearly in line with the camera angle is Huron Street. Jeffries and Idell Streets are the two left of Huron; a mile or so behind them is the top of Mt. Washington. The hills south of Figueroa, on the other side of the Arroyo, are Montecito Heights.

A block south (to the right) of Huron is Figueroa, which bends to the right and curves up the Arroyo, towards the horizon. In the foreground Figueroa doglegs to the original Dayton bridge. This span, the first of several at this site, was built in 1903. (It was demolished and replaced in 1927 / 1928, rebuilt in 1939, and is now being replaced again.)

http://wwww.dkse.net/david/Elysian/CHS-7087.jpg

http://www.lapl.org/

My "now" shot (taken from Grandview Point) shows how much busier this area has become! The river, encased in concrete in the late 1930's, has been slightly realigned. The bridge framework seen at the bottom of the frame is the old L-shaped Figueroa bridge, currently in the final stages of demolition. The wider, more elegantly curved new bridge lies adjacent. The riverbank area between the new bridge and Interstate 5 (crossing the frame horizontally), once home to tens of thousands of pigeons, is now a staging area for the bridge project, and on the other side of the tracks is Confluence Park. Positioned diagonally at the foot of Huron Street is a new Home Depot store. The group of railroad sidings is now a Metrolink maintenance yard. To the left of our old friend Figueroa Street is Mt. Washington, now mostly covered with homes. Across the Arroyo, Montecito Heights is still mostly undeveloped. But perhaps not for much longer, if The Church of the Foursquare Gospel (owner of the property for some 80 years) gets their way!

http://wwww.dkse.net/david/Elysian/DSCN5307.JPG


(I wonder how this location will look in another hundred years!)


Before moving on, here's a photo I found of the original Dayton Bridge. This is the bridge seen in the old Pigeon Farm, viewed from the opposite direction. I don't think this has appeared on NLA before.

http://wwww.dkse.net/david/Elysian/_Dayton.Bridge.jpg

http://www.usc.edu/libraries/

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

After visiting this spot, Lorendoc and I explored a few other places in Elysian Park. To me, Elysian is a very interesting but somewhat odd place. At 600 acres it's L.A.'s second largest park (after Griffith Park, of course) and was founded back in 1886. The park has lots of great views and many hiking trails, though I've never found a map that shows them. A number of old paved roads criss-cross the park but many are quite narrow and in poor condition, with large cracks and potholes. The picnic areas are popular but much of the park has a forgotten feeling. Some of L.A.'s steepest streets (Baxter, Fargo, and Duane) are nearby. Adjoining the park are some really interesting older neighborhoods -- Elysian Valley, Lincoln Heights, and of course Chinatown. With a little searching one can find some interesting and quirky things in and around Elysian.

The Police Academy has been mentioned here a few times lately, so we decided to drive over to have a look. It was a Saturday afternoon with a ball game in progress at the stadium, so we weren't sure we'd be able to enter, but it wasn't a problem. A guard at the booth motioned us to park in the visitor lot. After doing so we spoke with him and were disappointed to hear that the 'Rock Garden", discussed here recently, is closed for about 2 years while the Cafe is being remodeled. But he explained that we were welcome to wander around the property and take photos.

The LAPD site offers a bit of history on the Academy campus. Here's an abridged version and some photos from our visit:

"The Los Angeles Police Academy is located in the 21-acre Elysian Park complex. The Academy is nestled in a picturesque setting of fountains, waterfalls, pine trees, and flowers. The classrooms, gymnasium, track, athletic field, obstacle course, and firing range, housed in and among Spanish-style buildings, are used for recreational and sports purposes, as well as training.

In the early 1900s, upon meeting minimum requirements, police officers were simply given their badges and assigned to protect the City. Since they received no formal training, they learned while on the job, from other police officers or through trial and error. In 1924, when a program of training for new officers was instituted, there was no regular training facility, and the Department had to use classroom space at an armory in Elysian Park.

In 1925, the Los Angeles Police Revolver and Athletic Club (LAPRAAC) was formed, and a private organization of sworn members of the Department opened a pistol range in Elysian Park on the site of the present Police Academy. This range was to play a pivotal part in future training for the Los Angeles Police Department. That future began in earnest when, during the 1932 World Games, the Olympic Committee obtained permission to use the range for the pistol and rifle competition. When the games were over, the Department was given the dormitory building. The structure, which had been used at the Olympic Village in Baldwin Hills, was dismantled and transported to the Elysian Park site by off-duty officers, and then reassembled for use as a clubhouse. Later it became the basis for the present Academy restaurant and cafe.

In 1935, the Board of Park Commissioners approved the plans of the Los Angeles Police Revolver and Athletic Club for development of an athletic center that included the construction of a rock garden and waterfalls near the athletic field and shooting range. Francois Scotti, an expert landscape artist, was commissioned to design and build the rock garden, which includes a series of four pools, several cascades, a small amphitheater for band and stage settings, and an outdoor dining area. A large patio, barbecue pit, stairways, walks, and recessed stone seats were also included. The rock garden was subsequently dedicated by the City in 1973 as Cultural Heritage Monument #110. Today it is the most picturesque spot on the Academy grounds.

A variety of recreational facilities are available for use by Department personnel and their dependents, including a tennis court, swimming pool, gymnasium, weight room, sauna, steam room, two racquetball courts, 1/8 mile track, and picnic areas. The Academy Cafe is open to the public. The Police Revolver and Athletic Club store sells guns, athletic gear, and a variety of police equipment."

http://wwww.dkse.net/david/Elysian/DSCN5299.JPG

http://wwww.dkse.net/david/Elysian/DSCN5297.JPG

http://wwww.dkse.net/david/Elysian/DSCN5293.JPG

http://wwww.dkse.net/david/Elysian/DSCN5285.JPG

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

A final item: while walking along Lilac Terrace, south of the Stadium, we happened upon this historical marker, partly hidden by trees and bushes.

http://wwww.dkse.net/david/Elysian/J...Cemetary.a.jpg


The marker reads:

FIRST JEWISH SITE IN LOS ANGELES

The Hebrew Benevolent Society of Los Angeles (1854), first charitable organization in the city, acquired this site by deed on April 9, 1855 from the City Council for a sacred burial ground. This property represented the first organized community effort by the pioneer Jewish settlers.


Neither of us had heard of this spot before and I think it is new to NLA. Doing a little research, I found an Times article dated April 24, 1986, with a little more info:

"When California was admitted to the Union in 1850, it has been reported that there were eight Jews living in Los Angeles. Nearly a century and a half later, that population has proliferated, with growth and contributions evidenced by the many historic sites around the city. (The former site of the) Hebrew Benevolent Society Cemetery (is located at) Lookout Drive and Lilac Terrace, Chavez Ravine. California Registered Landmark No. 822 is the first Jewish site in Los Angeles. Located south of Dodger Stadium, behind the armory, it is empty now, since the bodies were moved to the Home of Peace Cemetery, but the past is remembered by a plaque on the hillside of Chavez Ravine. The society, organized in 1854, is presently known as Jewish Family Service."

All photos mine, except where noted.

ethereal_reality Aug 29, 2014 12:46 AM

:previous: Excellent posts HossC and 3940dxer/David!! Just like the old days on NLA.
-makes me so happy :)
__

It's beyond me how anyone could justify covering up 818 Wilshire with cheesy mirrored glass.



-Here's another of those streetcar photos I've been finding on eBay recently.
The seller's information was "Monte Vista and Ave. 61".

http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/xq90/661/fkTT6u.jpgebay

I thought I'd check this one out myself.

Here's pretty much the same view today. The impressive building belongs to the Department of Water and Power, (station #2)

http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/xq90/539/dVc0Zy.jpg
GSV

This makes up somewhat for the 74th St. School disappointment.

__

FredH Aug 29, 2014 1:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Beaudry (Post 6708794)
Oh yeah, that's 336 S Bunker Hill Ave. Not very photographed, because it was across from the Salt Box, so everyone had their backs turned to it while snapping the Salt Box and Castle on the odd side of the street. Note the Alta Cresta in the bg, which fronted Bunker Hill Ave and Grand, and which you'll see identically in this 1962 image from Palmer Connor:

https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3880/...1ffc7d8d_b.jpghuntington

Also, up in your eBay pic, at lower right you'll note there's a service garage at 344/346 next door. That's a corner of the mechanics' shop built on the site of the Brunson as detailed here.

And yes, I've got a big fat bid in on this pic! :yes:


Beaudry - You are correct. All of the action seemed to be focused on The Castle and The Saltbox across the street. I finally found this color photo
which seems to have been taken from about the same spot as ER's snapshot.

336 S. Bunker Hill Ave. - 1962

http://i129.photobucket.com/albums/p...psef521158.jpg
http://hdl.huntington.org/cdm/single...d/7639/rec/217


Posted by ER:

1963
http://i129.photobucket.com/albums/p...ps398e37ad.jpg
Ebay

MichaelRyerson Aug 29, 2014 1:18 AM

Couple more shots of Metropolitan Federal
 
One of my favorite little buildings.

https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3756/...75c3b247_o.jpgMetropolitan Federal Savings, 818 Wilshire Boulevard, ca.1948 (2)

There's the Statler down on the left and the Rex Arms on the right.

USC digital archive/Los Angeles Examiner Collection, 1920-1961



https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5574/...31c0d3fb_o.jpgMetropolitan Federal Savings, 818 Wilshire Boulevard, ca.1948 (2)


Nice shot of the distinctive front 'grillework' detail.

USC digital archive/Los Angeles Examiner Collection, 1920-1961

Beaudry Aug 29, 2014 1:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by FredH (Post 6708617)
http://i129.photobucket.com/albums/p...ps70466ce7.jpg
L.A. Times

Times story is here:

http://framework.latimes.com/2014/08...ith-gas-masks/


I'm not sure how well you can see out of the damn thing, but it might beat an eye full of smog.

Anyone know where the photo was taken?

That's looking east on 8th St from near Flower toward Hope. Here's a shot of First Methodist on the SW corner of 8th and Hope:

http://urbandiachrony.files.wordpres...g?w=621&h=1596urbandiachrony

Everything in the 1955 shot is now parking lot, except for the two large buildings looming in the smog in the bg. At right is the Commercial Exchange at Olive, and at left, the twin towers of the Garfield at Hill.

pwrof3 Aug 29, 2014 1:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sopas ej (Post 5409285)
Evolution of Pasadena's Old Town in Somewhat of a Nutshell

To think Old Town Pasadena would have been destroyed in the 1970s.

By then, Old Town had become seedy, full of dive bars, thrift stores, pawn shops, etc. Pasadena's downtown had moved east to Lake Avenue, and the city had plans to basically knock down all of Old Town Pasadena and turn it into an office park with non-sidewalk-oriented medium-rise office buildings and parking garages. When old landmarks started to fall to the wrecking ball, concerned Pasadenans said "oh HELLZ no!" and thus was born Pasadena's strict ordinances and movements to save old buildings.

Old Town is where the city of Pasadena began, basically. In Los Angeles, as it developed, it started moving west. In Pasadena, as it developed, it started moving east. Anyway, the intersection of Fair Oaks Avenue and Colorado Street (now Boulevard) was the main crossroads of the town. The city was incorporated in 1886, but it was founded in the 1870s, first by Midwesterners wanting to create an agricultural colony, but later it became a resort town for wealthy Easterners and Midwesterners, looking for some place to go for the winter. Many later became permanent residents.

Looking southeast at Fair Oaks and Colorado, sometime between 1908-1910
http://img684.imageshack.us/img684/5...utheastfai.jpg
USC Archive

These people all look so properly dressed. Might they all have been Midwesterners? There's a street in the eastern part of Pasadena called Michillinda Avenue. Michillinda is a hybridization of Michigan, Illinois and Indiana.

Looking east on Colorado at Fair Oaks, circa 1907. Look at that car on the left.
http://img98.imageshack.us/img98/552...stoncolora.jpg
USC Archive

Northwest corner of Fair Oaks and Colorado, circa 1890s.
http://img692.imageshack.us/img692/5...roaksandco.jpg
USC Archive

Looking northeasterly along Colorado at Fair Oaks, sometime around the first decade of the 20th Century.
http://img560.imageshack.us/img560/9...asterlyonc.jpg
USC Archive

Look at all of those ornate Victorian façades. You can also see congestion at that intersection. By the time that the automobile became more widely in use, this section of Colorado had become a bottleneck. So in the late 1920s (1928-1929 I believe?), the City embarked on a widening project of Colorado, about a quarter mile of it through what is now Old Town. This involved cutting back 14 feet of buildings on either side. Therefore, all of the old Victorian façades were lost, the fronts of the buildings being remodeled into Deco and Spanish-styles (some buildings even losing their upper floors). If you look at the buildings from their alley sides, though, you can see that the buildings are much older than their fronts would suggest.

Looking east at Fair Oaks and Colorado, 1929. You can see that the corner building has been demolished, and the others are going to be shaved off.
http://img200.imageshack.us/img200/4...ngeastfrom.png
Huntington Library Collection

Looking east on Colorado towards Fair Oaks, circa 1930. The widening is complete.
http://img839.imageshack.us/img839/3...ngeastatfa.png
Huntington Library Collection

Southeast corner of Colorado and Fair Oaks, circa 1930.
http://img23.imageshack.us/img23/4428/picture3uc.png
Huntington Library Collection

Southeast corner of Colorado and Fair Oaks, August 2011.
http://img52.imageshack.us/img52/9606/p1180632.jpg
Photo by me

More run-down period, southeast corner of Colorado and Fair Oaks, 1989.
http://jpg1.lapl.org/pics31/00035215.jpg
LAPL

Wow. What a fascinating post: I shortened it for everyone's sake, but it is worth going back and checking it out.

I can't believe that Pasadena has gone trough such a transformation. Thank God they didn't demolish it and cleaned it up. What an amazing example of how to turn around downtrodden downtown areas. I sincerely hope that the Broadway corridor in Los Angeles gets this treatment in my lifetime. What a jewel to be sitting there rotting.

Back to Pasadena, I was just out there this last weekend for a convention at the newer convention center.
I spent a day on Colorado and Fair Oaks at all of the amazing stores and restaurants. Definitely my favorite part of the entire city. I applaud the citizens and government of Pasadena for that miraculous trunk around.
Had to eat at Coolhaus, by the way. For those that don't know, they are extreme ice cream sandwiches.

Beaudry Aug 29, 2014 1:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by FredH (Post 6710097)
Beaudry - You are correct. All of the action seemed to be focused on The Castle and The Saltbox across the street. I finally found this color photo
which seems to have been taken from about the same spot as ER's snapshot.

336 S. Bunker Hill Ave. - 1962

http://i129.photobucket.com/albums/p...psef521158.jpg
http://hdl.huntington.org/cdm/single...d/7639/rec/217


Posted by ER:

1963
http://i129.photobucket.com/albums/p...ps398e37ad.jpg
Ebay

Ha! That's funny. I thought there was a shot by PC at the Hunt and I made a cursory look-see but didn't find it. I keep the PC collection catalogued in Scrivener and somehow this one didn't make it in. Goes to show, computers can't do anything stupid unless we help them first!

FredH Aug 29, 2014 1:35 AM

June 1954 - South side of Court Street west of Grand Avenue


http://i129.photobucket.com/albums/p...pse6d5fd76.jpg
http://hdl.huntington.org/cdm/single...d/8820/rec/251


Circus at the Rose Bowl. And I bet the animals really enjoyed the fireworks.

http://i129.photobucket.com/albums/p...ps7a1a7957.jpg
http://hdl.huntington.org/cdm/single...d/8820/rec/251


Beaudry - I think some new shots by Palmer Conner may have been posted at Huntington recently. There are a few I don't recall
seeing before, but then again the old bean isn't what it used to be.

HossC Aug 29, 2014 1:44 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 6709611)

This streetcar photo was labeled "Pacific Blvd".
http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/xq90/743/48WSNA.jpg
ebay

-note the large SWIFT sign in the distance on the left.

The building on the right is the Champion Armature Corp at 4632 Pacific Boulevard (found in the 1956 CD). Amazingly, the current electrical equipment on the utility poles is still almost identical to picture above. I'm guessing that the "SWIFT" sign might have been on or near the Swift and Company plant (makers of Formay, Parfay, Golden West Salad Oil etc.) which was a few blocks away in about that direction. We looked at the plant fairly recently in post #22940, although none of the pictures show this sign.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...d.jpg~original
GSV

C. King Aug 29, 2014 1:59 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 6709953)
CBD or Loyalton, do you happen to know the make of this firetruck? (circa 1942)
It has some of the same curved lines as the American LaFrance.

originally posted by Handsome Stranger
http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/800...661/AmRJci.jpg


Here's the link to HS's original post showing truck, as well as fire station #43.
http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...postcount=9793

__

ER,

Engine 43 shown above is a 1940 Kenworth/United. One of 3 that the LAFD bought. Nicknamed a "Coke Wagon" from the design of it.

Here is a pic of the station a couple of years prior to its closing in 2007. Moved into a brand new firehouse nearby.

http://i969.photobucket.com/albums/a...re/LFDFS43.jpg

Photo by me.

Albany NY Aug 29, 2014 2:26 AM

Drawing attention to itself (get it?)
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 6709732)
Los Angeles -I'm guessing late 1940s or early1950 (the building appears much more modern than the cars)

http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/102...673/sSwXfl.jpg
ebay

Since everyone has already figured out that the address was 818 Wilshire Blvd., I thought I'd post a matchbook cover I found on Pinterest.

http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/102...661/MWO1O9.jpghttp://www.pinterest.com/funnel_eric...-matchbox-art/

pwrof3 Aug 29, 2014 3:03 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Beaudry (Post 5429547)
Been a while since I've posted, and there's a lot on which I want to comment, but before I get to any of that, I'll share a trip I made to the California State Building -- yes, this one:

http://farm7.static.flickr.com/6008/...936cbde4_o.jpg
USC

...even though it's really rather not there. And while in theory one's not supposed to visit what's left, my wayward youth left me with a healthy disrespect for No Trespassing signage. Soooo...

Up Spring from First there's still the stairway to its east entrance, and the entry to the underground parking garage:

http://farm7.static.flickr.com/6151/...70cf3571_b.jpg

The approach from First:

http://farm7.static.flickr.com/6164/...cf2ac38d_o.jpg
Ouch. Behind, L to R, the Hall of Administration, the Hall of Records, the Criminal Courts.

And here we are, that characteristic John C Austin State Bldg shape --

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And there's this flooring,
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posted here before, though seen from up in City Hall, but now, let's get a closer look, bust out the ol' Then-n-Nows:

Walk through the revolving door, turn back and look toward First:

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Looking across the lobby toward the east:

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Looking back out of the building, toward B'way -- at the pit where the 1960 California State Office Bldg used to be.

http://farm7.static.flickr.com/6163/...f289a8a2_o.jpg

Note that they're gutting the 1958 Law Library (seen here, center right) -- what's that about? And yes, that crane is up on the site of the Dome, now plugging away at the Broad...

In any event, the midday sun kind of bleached out the images. Would like to see how this marble looks after a good rain. Parting image of a close-up:

http://farm7.static.flickr.com/6175/...0fddce23_o.jpg


Lobby photos, Mott Studios, Cal State Library, accessed here and here

I know this is old, but, Beaudry, how did you get in there in broad daylight and not get caught?

I can't believe that space still sits there empty. I mean, at the least I would think some money grubbing parking agency would have paved it and charged $20 a day or something.


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