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CityBoyDoug Mar 12, 2019 9:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Martin Pal (Post 8501972)
Hi, E_R,





I'm pretty sure the place you're referring to was called Chin Chin's. It opened in 1983. I should say it IS called Chin Chin's, bcause it is still there!

https://www.sunsetplaza.com/sites/de...th%20Plaza.jpgSunset Plaza




This place appears to be a worldwide restaurant chain. The photos of their food looks tasty and colorful.

Jungmann Mar 13, 2019 12:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CityBoyDoug (Post 8503407)
This place appears to be a worldwide restaurant chain. The photos of their food looks tasty and colorful.

HI CB Doug

Not the place you want to go if you want some hard-core Chinese food--try Szechewan Impressions. Chin-Chin is Chinese-lite, or better Cali-Chinese, nothing on the menu with much backbone. But good service and decent prices.

ethereal_reality Mar 13, 2019 2:59 PM

:previous: It wasn't a chain when I ate there in the late 1980s...so I imagine the Sunset location is the original location.


When it first opened it was thee place to go....very crowded all the time.
I had a "we're not in Kansas anymore" moment at the restaurant. I was eating and virtually everyone around me was extremely beautiful.
It was like a bus had dropped off a modeling school or something. And when I looked around all the women appeared to wearing thong underwear.
They had the part in the back pulled waay up (I guess that's how they wore them in the 1980s :shrug:).

This was quite a shock for a midwesterner like me.

ethereal_reality Mar 13, 2019 3:10 PM

Martin Pal, I'm confused.....so the Trocadero building disappeared and then reappeared? (so what's there today is a replica?)


Marsha Hunt and Bob Cummings out on the town.

https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1...923/AchQn0.jpg
https://hollywoodphotographs.com/det...c=114&i=1&r=12



and their set of wheels.

https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/8...924/Z64mu6.jpg
https://hollywoodphotographs.com/det...c=114&i=1&r=12

circa 1937

_

ethereal_reality Mar 13, 2019 3:33 PM

I have never heard the term "plain' used to describe any area in, or around, Los Angeles.



"Grassy plain #4, Los Angeles" [c.1889]

https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1...924/dJqiUM.jpggettyphotoarchives
can't locate a direct link. (this is from one of my old files)



so I'll do it this way.

https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/6...922/TLHN0f.jpg

As you can see..there are, at the least, three other photographs of "Grassy Plain, Los Angeles".


search terms: george davidson - carleton watkins - albumen silver print

ethereal_reality Mar 13, 2019 3:45 PM

Here's another from the Getty Museum.

"SE Base Los Angeles Plains." [c.1889]

https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1...921/GzKoIn.jpg
getty photo archives again, I can't find the direct link.

https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/6...924/wSLlBQ.jpg

Same month and year as the previous photograph. (so "southeast" is a pretty good clue for both images)
And that's an early oil well, right? My imagination wants me to believe it's a lookout tower for this, so called, "base".

search terms: george davidson - carleton watkins - Cyanotype

ethereal_reality Mar 13, 2019 4:02 PM

Back to Chin Chin.

We haven't seen this view looking west..

https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1...923/z3KjjE.jpg
sunsetplaza

It shows how much of the original building is hidden by all the awnings and signs. A bit of a shame, really.

_

Martin Pal Mar 13, 2019 7:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 8504132)
:previous: It [Chin Chin's] wasn't a chain when I ate there in the late 1980s...so I imagine the Sunset location is the original location.
_________________________________________________________________

You are correct. From their website: Chin Chin made its debut in Los Angeles in 1983, introducing dim sum and other Chinese favorites prepared fresh to order, without adding any MSG, and served in a contemporary environment with friendly and efficient service.

For more than 30 years, Chin Chin has firmly established itself as one of the most iconic restaurant brands in Los Angeles, with 4 locations throughout the city and one in the New York- New York Hotel & Casino™ in Las Vegas, Nevada.


Quote:

Originally Posted by Jungmann (Post 8503670)
Not the place you want to go if you want some hard-core Chinese food--try Szechewan Impressions. Chin-Chin is Chinese-lite, or better Cali-Chinese, nothing on the menu with much backbone. But good service and decent prices.
___________________________________________________________________

Speaking of that opinion, here's a recent review of the place: At this point, living off Daddy’s credit card and being obsessed with Chin Chin for a summer is a right of passage for most new arrivals to Los Angeles. But the reality is, this sceney Chinese restaurant has never been anything else besides aggressively second-rate. If you’re there because you and your friends want to be seen on the patio or because Lauren Conrad went there in 2010 - fine. But if you’re there to eat anything close to legitimate Chinese food, you have been entirely misinformed.

Ooh, snap!


Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 8504132)
When it first opened it was thee place to go....very crowded all the time.
_________________________________________________________________

Every time I've gone past Chin Chin's lately it is still crowded.

One of Lily Tomlin's famous lines from one of her stage shows was in a monologue of things she worries about. One of them was, "I worry that the person who thought up Muzak might be thinking up something else."

In that vein, the founder of Chin Chin is "thinking up something else." In an article on L.A. Eater from last year:

West Third Street’s former Gusto space is being put to good use thanks to one very famous restaurant name, reopening later this year as an upscale casual spot called My Little Dumpling.

My Little Dumpling is the work of Robert and Anthony Mandler, a father-son duo with plenty of experience in the restaurant business. The former founded the mega-popular upscale Chinese restaurant chain Chin Chin way back in 1983, envisioning the place as a see-and-be-seen spot for classic New York City-style Chinese food. Now the pair is keen to replicate the model in new ways, offering dumplings and a few other staples as well as beer and wine. This will be a full-service restaurant, with decor and ambiance provided by son Anthony Mandler.


This place just opened on February 5th. 8432 W. 3rd St., Los Angeles.

Martin Pal Mar 13, 2019 7:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 8504158)
Martin Pal, I'm confused.....so the Trocadero building disappeared and then reappeared? (so what's there today is a replica?)
___________________________________________________________________


Yes, I don't know if what is there now was meant to incorporate some of the 1930's design elements of the original place or it's coincidental, but it's a new building sometime after 2010.

odinthor Mar 13, 2019 9:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 8504207)
Here's another from the Getty Museum.

"SE Base Los Angeles Plains." [c.1889]

https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1...921/GzKoIn.jpg
getty photo archives again, I can't find the direct link.

https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/6...924/wSLlBQ.jpg

Same month and year as the previous photograph. (so "southeast" is a pretty good clue for both images)
And that's an early oil well, right? My imagination wants me to believe it's a lookout tower for this, so called, "base".

search terms: george davidson - carleton watkins - Cyanotype

We moderns aren't used to calling anything in the area of L.A. the "plains"; but it was familiar usage to early Angelenos, perhaps deriving from the position of "Judge of the Plains" (Juez del Campo).

Just for fun, I've picked out from my notes some usages of the term "plains." Here they are, in chronological order, with their context in unapologetic profusion:

—August 27, 1853, published (Los Angeles Star): “Mr. B.A. Townsend, who has for some time been running a coach between this city and San Pedro, has sold out his coaches and all his interest therein to Messrs. Alexander & Banning, and withdrawn from the road.—Many will regret this, for while Mr. Townsend was on the road low fares ruled, and there was many an interesting race between the horses and the mules. But the mules were hard to beat, and now they will, as before time, trot over the plains without opposition. Mr. Townsend deserves the thanks of the community for his perseverance under adverse circumstances; and Messrs. Alexander and Banning will, we hope, have their energetic determination to serve the community appreciated.”

—January 25, 1855, published (Los Angeles Star): “Mr. D.W. Alexander, assisted by his vaqueros, lassoed a wild boar of enormous size, who it is believed has been running wild on the plains several years. His tusks were from six to eight inches long, the potency of which was fully [at]tested, by a frightful gore in one of the horses used in his capture.”

—March, 1855, “We anchored at San Pedro, the port of Los Angeles, in one hundred and twelve days from Boston [aboard the Arcadia]; the passage, though a good one, was lengthened some days by not having a reliable crew to take in sail, when the ship could have been pressed more than she was. And now again, in a well-remembered spot, how familiar everything appeared! The hills were clothed in green, the plains were waving with an immense sea of wild mustard in full blossom. The colored patches of earth in the far distance marked out, as in former years, the gardens of San Gabriel. The old bluff point of the harbor, known as ‘Don Abe[l]’s Nose’, was still there, its proportions unchanged by winds or rains. The one adobe house, and its wooden frame companion, were, as in former years, the sole tenements of the port. The cattle and horses had disappeared from the hills; all else seemed as in olden times,” Phelps, William Dane (as “Webfoot”). Fore and Aft; or, Leaves from the Life of an Old Sailor. No location listed: No publisher listed, 1870, p. 328. "Don Abel" is of course Abel Stearns, who maintained a warehouse at San Pedro.

—May 29, 1858, published (Los Angeles Star): “We stated in our last publication, that Capt. Thomas Seely, of the steamer Senator, had extended the hospitalities of his steamer to the citizens of Los Angeles, for the purpose of proceeding to San Diego to participate in the pleasures of a ball and supper, to be given by the citizens of that city to their visitors from Los Angeles. Accordingly, on Thursday afternoon that prompt[,] enterprising, and ever obliging gentleman P. Banning, Esq., had his stages ready, which were gratuitously placed at the service of the citizens, for the purpose of conveying them from Los Angeles to San Pedro. Two o’clock, P.M., being the hour appointed to start, the carriages drew up in front of the Bella Union Hotel for the reception of passengers, and were very soon filled to their utmost capacity, the ladies having been waited on at their residences. All being ready, the order to move was given—Mr. Banning led off with his prancing six-in-hand; the music struck up, and the other stages followed, the cavalcade presenting a gay appearance, as it swept out of town and dashed over the plains. On arriving at the Beach, the party were conducted aboard Banning’s clipper yacht ‘Medora,’ and conveyed to the steamer Senator, where they were received by Captain Seely and his courteous officers—Capt. Gorman, first officer, and Mr. A.O. Spencer, Purser, whose politeness and attention to the comfort of passengers are at all times conspicuous. The stages of Mr. Timms were also placed at the service of the citizens, and all duly notified of the accommodation; his clipper yacht also conveyed passengers to the steamer; and in every respect and manner, Mr. Timms evinced his desire to promote the comfort and pleasure of his excursionists.”

—February 12, 1859, published (Los Angeles Star): “A specimen of the ‘antique’ was picked up on the plains this week by Mr. Virgen, one of our resident surveyors, being an elaborately chased silver buckle. He took it to a silversmith, who stated that, from the condition in which it was found, it must have lain in the earth thirty or forty years. It is of native manufacture.”

—March 10, 1860, published (Los Angeles Star): “In the prosecution of their duties they [the members of the Grand Jury] have been greatly retarded by the absence of witnesses, and the great difficulty experienced in procuring their attendance. The District attorney has been always prompt in attendance upon their session, and has used every endeavor to facilitate the investigations before them, and the Sheriff has manifested the same desire to aid them efficiently in the discharge of their duties, but it being the season of Rodeos, a large number of the witnesses required, are so scattered over the plains, at a distance from their usual places of residence, that it has been wholly impracticable for the officers to find them, and secure their attendance, and the consequence has been that charges have been ignored for the want of legal evidence where there was a moral conviction of the guilt of the parties accused.”

—November 10, 1860, published (Los Angeles Star): “On Tuesday last a murder was committed in this city, by a quadroon, named Lawrence Smith, which has thrown the deepest gloom over a large circle in this city. About noon, the quadroon, who is about eighteen years old, was playing marbles with a number of small boys, near the corner of Los Angeles and First streets; and falling out with the children about the game, he commenced abusing them in loud and indecent language, to the great annoyance of the neighborhood. A couple of persons went over and remonstrated with Lawrence, and ordered him to cease his abuse of the white boys and to use no further indecent language within the hearing of neighboring families. This seemed to further enrage the negro, and he commenced the most indiscriminate abuse of those present, in the vilest Billingsgate. At this time, at the instance of some of the nearest residents, Mr. Henry Ferling went over to the negro and ordered him to leave that locality or desist in his noisy and blackguard language. The negro then turned upon Mr. Ferling and commenced abusing him in the foulest conceivable manner. Mr. Ferling then approached the negro to chastise him, when the latter ran into a small alley which leads from First street, on the west side. Mr. Ferling followed the black scoundrel into the alley, toward the rear, when he overtook and caught him by the shoulder, upon which the negro drew a knife and stabbed Mr. Ferling in the abdomen, from which wound he died, about five o’clock in the afternoon of the same day. The negro immediately ran away towards the plains, and, although diligently searched for during that day by forty or fifty persons, he escaped from them, and up to the present has not been arrested. His mother and other relations live in San Bernardino, and it is supposed he has gone in that direction.”

—December 29, 1860, published (Los Angeles Star): “In the south end of town the water [resulting from heavy rain] spread over nearly the whole plain.”

—April 30, 1864, published (Los Angeles Star): “Under and by virtue of a write of Execution issued out of the District Court […] and to me as Sheriff of said County duly directed and delivered, in favor of Concepcion Alaniz, and against the property of Martin Lelong, I have levied on all the right, title, and interest of the said defendant Martin Lelong, of, in, and to the following described tract or parcel of land, to wit: […] Bounded on the South by the Rancho of the Machados, on the North by the mountains of San Fernando, on the West by the Rancho of Francisco Sepulveda, and on the East by the Rancho of Ricardo Vejar, as will appear by the grant of Manuel Micheltorena, Governor, Commanding General and Inspector of both Californias, with date in the city of Los Angeles twenty-fourth of February A.D. 1843. Boundaries according to judicials possession. The cord was extended from a little hill about one hundred Varas to that part of the road that goes to San Vicente in a Westerly direction upon a line of the Machados who being present manifested no objection, and three thousand varas were measured, with the addition of one hundred varas more, which closed in the plains of San Vicente where was ordered to be placed a pillar of Stones and mortar, from this place a line was run in a northerly direction passing through a grove of mangrove trees, and the number of varas measured on this line was five thousand and four hundred and fifty which closed at [an] Oak on which are signs of cuts with an ax which oak can be found where the road to San Fernando goes through the mangrove Valley. Thence the line was run in an Easterly direction, including a part of the mountain, and thence measured five thousand four hundred varas, which line closes on the top of a Sharp cone or hill, which will be found on the opposite side of the valley of Sycamores, from hence the line was run south, measuring five thousand and five hundred varas which closes at the beginning point, the said tract or parcel of land being known as San Jose de Buenos Ayres, and is so designated in the original grant, and in the act of judicial possession, the interest of said defendant Martin Lelong, being all the interest and title of Maria Dorotea Alaniz[,] one of the heirs of Maximo Alaniz deceased purchased by deed of date November 13th A.D. 1852.”

—May 28, 1864, published (Los Angeles Star): “The Alta’s San Diego correspondent has made a furious attack on the settlement in this county, known as Wilmington. Couldn’t ‘Diego’ let up a little, just a little, on the bad location, dry arid plains, alkali dust, covering Drum Barracks in Vesuvian quantity, the low marshy lands, &c., &c.—or must the green-eyed monster have these plains both arid and marshy. We shall move that the State Capital be located at San Diego, if that will satisfy that highly enterprising community, if they just let us alone—that’s all we ask.”

ethereal_reality Mar 14, 2019 4:53 AM

Wow! Thanks so much for the information odinthor.

...to be honest, I haven't finished reading it all. My eyes began to cross.

Bristolian Mar 14, 2019 4:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by odinthor (Post 8504675)

—December 29, 1860, published (Los Angeles Star): “In the south end of town the water [resulting from heavy rain] spread over nearly the whole plain.”

The rain in Los Angeles falls mainly on the plain?

ethereal_reality Mar 14, 2019 4:58 PM

Here is an interesting group of photographs, including four cyanotypes, recently listed on Ebay

Here's the seller's description.

This listing is for a small grouping of 10 early snapshot photos all from one estate. I don't know much about them except for what is on the back. One is of Orchard Camp on Mt. Wilson and is marked as being taken by H. C. Gibbs of L.A. One of the cyanotypes is marked "Fair Oaks drive to tennis courts" on the back. 2 are of San Gabriel, of the church interior and of the largest grapevine. Another is of a parade in downtown LA. These were found stored together in an estate. This is fresh from a closet and shows normal wear and patina for an item of this vintage.


#1
https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1...924/DPdJoF.jpg

Crating up oranges. (note the pile of oranges)








#2
https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1...921/5fQfOE.jpg

Five ladies sitting on a porch.








#3
https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1...922/hZeMeq.jpg

This one is quite intriguing. Does anyone know what this man is working on?
The drapery, that's hanging behind the man, might have been placed there specifically for the photograph.









#4
https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1...921/IEF6N1.jpg

This is my favorite. This might be the one that was labeled "Fair Oaks drive to tennis courts". I love the plank walkway that makes it's way through the arbor.











#5
https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1...924/lSDRan.jpg

This appears to be one of the mission churches. Perhaps this is the interior of the San Gabriel Mission as it looked in the 1890s.








#6
https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1...921/P6nfeV.jpg

This place looks familiar. I believe this might be "the largest grapevine" mentioned by the seller.







#7
https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1...924/TYHTEP.jpg

This appears to be, the much discussed, Virginia Hotel in Long Beach.









#8
https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1...923/6qUY9H.jpg

Coastal rocks. If there were seals I'd say this might be 'Seal Rock'.











#9
https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1...923/nkcwq6.jpg

Orchard Camp entrance on Mt. Wilson.









And lastly, #10!

#10
https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/xq90/922/jdr1cG.jpg

Mystery parade, downtown Los Angeles.

Does anyone recognize the building?

__

Earl Boebert Mar 14, 2019 5:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 8505680)







#3
https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1...922/hZeMeq.jpg

This one is quite intriguing. Does anyone know what this man is working on?
The drapery, that's hanging behind the man, might have been placed there specifically for the photograph.



__

I think that is a large kite sitting behind him, and possibly two box kites beside him.

Cheers,

Earl

ethereal_reality Mar 14, 2019 7:06 PM

Wow. I believe you're correct Earl. Now I find the photograph even more intriguing.

Thanks!

HossC Mar 14, 2019 9:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 8505680)

And lastly, #10!

#10
https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/xq90/922/jdr1cG.jpg

Mystery parade, downtown Los Angeles.

Does anyone recognize the building?

We're at the corner of 1st and Broadway. The 1908 CD lists the Los Angeles Abstract & Trust Co at 100 S Broadway and Alex Culver Real Estate at 104 S Broadway. Here's a slightly later picture.

Quote:

Originally Posted by HossC (Post 8107583)

The 1921 Baist map names the building as the Culver Block. Here it is on the left of a 1920 photo (just over half of the 1st Street side is visible).

A white Van de Kamp's delivery truck and a convertible wait in traffic for pedestrians to pass on Broadway and 1st Street. A "classic" Coca-Cola sign is on the corner building. Cevola Shoe Repairing will work "While-u-wait".

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...rBlock1920.jpg
LAPL


Earl Boebert Mar 14, 2019 10:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 8505883)
Wow. I believe you're correct Earl. Now I find the photograph even more intriguing.

Thanks!

After playing with the image a bit more, it's clear he's rigging a pennant or flag.

Cheers,

Earl

ScottyB Mar 14, 2019 11:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 8505680)

This one is quite intriguing. Does anyone know what this man is working on?
The drapery, that's hanging behind the man, might have been placed there specifically for the photograph.









#4
https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1...921/IEF6N1.jpg

This is my favorite. This might be the one that was labeled "Fair Oaks drive to tennis courts". I love the plank walkway that makes it's way through the arbor.





__

Fair Oaks Ranch in Altadena is a likely location, though I am a little suspicious of the (Ponderosa?) pines.

https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7859/...49521814_h.jpg
HDL

Here is the entire album.

ethereal_reality Mar 14, 2019 11:52 PM

:previous:

That photo album is amazing ScottyB.

Here's the cover. Fair Oaks Rancho, approximately 1885
https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/8...923/fbkEZs.jpg
huntington archive

I was hoping I would find the 'kite maker' in the album. (but no)
and I didn't see the plank walkway in any of the landscape photographs.
BUT my photo #1 is in the album. so. there's. that.


thx for the link
scottyb

BillinGlendaleCA Mar 15, 2019 6:48 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 8505680)
Here is an interesting group of photographs, including four cyanotypes, recently listed on Ebay

Here's the seller's description.

This listing is for a small grouping of 10 early snapshot photos all from one estate. I don't know much about them except for what is on the back. One is of Orchard Camp on Mt. Wilson and is marked as being taken by H. C. Gibbs of L.A. One of the cyanotypes is marked "Fair Oaks drive to tennis courts" on the back. 2 are of San Gabriel, of the church interior and of the largest grapevine. Another is of a parade in downtown LA. These were found stored together in an estate. This is fresh from a closet and shows normal wear and patina for an item of this vintage.

#5
https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1...924/lSDRan.jpg

This appears to be one of the mission churches. Perhaps this is the interior of the San Gabriel Mission as it looked in the 1890s.

__

That's the interior of the chapel at Mission San Gabriel, here's a more contemporary view:

https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7891/...cd33f0b3_b.jpg_9190012.jpg by BillinGlendaleCA, on Flickr


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