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GaylordWilshire Nov 27, 2018 9:34 PM

:previous:


You're right Hoss, re front vs back--it looks like there was an attempt to integrate the old and the new in the roof slopes, perhaps...but too much house for the lot, to say the least.

odinthor Nov 27, 2018 10:16 PM

Some desultory gleanings on Loomis St. . . .

From the 1909 Bird's Eye (Loomis Street diagonal at center; take note of the houses):

https://i.postimg.cc/3wtGDtjh/Loomis.jpg


In one of the pix in HossC's post, these older houses caught my eye (I don't understand the narrow not-quite-parallel paving on either side of the steps leading up to the house at left; or are they some sort of slope, scraped clean for planned landscaping?):

https://i.postimg.cc/vBDV75XV/Loomis2.jpg
http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/si...id/71316/rec/1


Loomis Street starts being mentioned in the Los Angeles Times in 1885, mostly real estate transactions, street improvements/gradings, and home addresses of people mentioned in news items.

In 1908, we start seeing crime stories concerning Loomis. A few selections (all from Los Angeles Times via ProQuest via CSULB Library, dates included in image). In the first one, it seems to me that Miss Corvell kept her nerve and cool quite remarkably well:

https://i.postimg.cc/FF7qWRKb/Loomis1910.jpg

The term "Black Hand" would suggest to readers of the time both extortionists (who would typically send a threatening letter demanding money "or else") and a shadowy Serbian society of anarchists or at least anti-monarchists); the use of this term in the article is playing on these meanings:

https://i.postimg.cc/05F4Ls6T/Loomis1914.jpg

Loomis St. lost its identity as such in 1932. I retain the items on morticians and Mr. Hutton for their inherent interest. Don't look at me like that--morticians are inherently interesting:

https://i.postimg.cc/DyGNhML8/Loomis1932.jpg

Um, why exactly was Western Dairy Products, Inc., interested in eliminating the name "Loomis Street"? At any rate, the City acceded to their request.

Scott Charles Nov 27, 2018 10:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 8391131)
https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1...921/GemJIJ.jpg

What's going on in the second floor (besides prostitution) that required so many flues. Did the architect forget to include chimneys?

p.s. perhaps Ms. Morton ran a massive opium den as well... thus the flues.

I've never given it any thought before, but does opium even have a smell?

If someone (like the police) were to walk past an opium den, could they recognize it as such from the smell alone?

- - -

Apparently, the popular perfume called “Opium” (which an ex-girlfriend of mine used to wear) only shares the name of the illicit substance - not the scent itself.

https://i.imgur.com/ine3NNe.jpg

Quote:

Its top notes are a mixture of fruit and spices, with mandarin orange, plum, clove, coriander and pepper, as well as bay leaf. Its floral middle notes consist predominantly jasmine, rose and Lily of the Valley, in addition to carnation, cinnamon, peach and orris root. It is underlined by the sweet woody base note containing sandalwood, cedarwood, myrrh, opopanax, labdanum, benzoin and castoreum, in addition to amber, incense, musk, patchouli, tolu and vetiver.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Opium_(perfume)

HossC Nov 27, 2018 11:14 PM

More Loomis Street.

I've just found this 1925 view of Loomis Street from a different angle (although I may have posted it before). The large empty lot in the foreground is where the Union Automobile Insurance Co building (aka Shell Building/LA Self Storage/1000 W 6th Street) would be built.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...misStreet2.jpg
USC Digital Library

Beaudry Nov 27, 2018 11:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 8374577)
Excellent information Beaudry.

I have a question:

What is the structure [outlined in RED below] that resembles the back of a billboard?

https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1...924/NKYeUZ.jpg
DETAIL

Considering the distance..it's much to large to be a billboard.

__

I know there have been some gripes about images that are too large, but I wanted to share all the detail I could in this image. (Also, too large? How is that even a thing?)

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4845/...f2245cfe_h.jpg

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4805/...4b658f6b_h.jpg

GaylordWilshire Nov 28, 2018 12:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HossC (Post 8392072)
More Loomis Street.

I've just found this 1925 view of Loomis Street from a different angle (although I may have posted it before). The large empty lot in the foreground is where the Union Automobile Insurance Co building (aka Shell Building/LA Self Storage/1000 W 6th Street) would be built.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...misStreet2.jpg
USC Digital Library


I can't help but notice the far one of the empty lots at the lower right (on the other side of the row of billboards), across from the 1924 Professional Building, which has now given way to one of those Mediterranean apartment complexes that isn't even made of chromium and spit. Anyway, in this aerial it has just recently been cleared of John Parkinson's house, which was pulled off its perch and moved to Lake Street. Read all about it at

https://losangeleshistory.blogspot.c...tories_12.html


https://i.postimg.cc/7hXc52hF/600-St...nfor-FBetc.jpg

odinthor Nov 28, 2018 12:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 8391131)
From an article titled Naughty Los Angeles in the 1890s.

We have discussed (and seen) Los Angeles' first City Hall many times on NLA...but this is the first time I've heard
there were prostitutes working inside.

https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1...924/iRk96y.jpg
VERSO Huntington Blog

Was anyone, here on NLA, aware of this?
_







SIDENOTE:

I might have mentioned flue #5 before, but I don't recall the other four!

https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1...921/GemJIJ.jpg

What's going on in the second floor (besides prostitution) that required so many flues. Did the architect forget to include chimneys?

p.s. perhaps Ms. Morton ran a massive opium den as well... thus the flues.

;)
__

Hmmm, e_r--good question. [scratches head] Have never heard of prostitution on the second floor (if memory serves, there was a beer-hall for a time on the ground floor). Wasn't the second floor built to be a theater, and then also used as a courtroom?

The ground floor was originally designed as market stalls. Perhaps each stall-unit had its own stove/heater, vented with a duct which was on the interior for its first-floor length (so as not to endanger or discommode passers-by), then routed outside at the second floor? :shrug: Just guessing.

But perhaps use of flues is why they call them floozies. :runaway:

Scott Charles Nov 28, 2018 5:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Beaudry (Post 8392100)
I know there have been some gripes about images that are too large, but I wanted to share all the detail I could in this image. (Also, too large? How is that even a thing?)

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4845/...f2245cfe_h.jpg

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4805/...4b658f6b_h.jpg

Wow!

Do you have a link to the full-sized image, Beaudry?

ethereal_reality Nov 28, 2018 6:15 AM

I just located the date for this photograph. It was taken in 1858.

https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/8...921/GemJIJ.jpg

By 1869 the flues have been rearranged into pairs.

https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/8...924/Ej9XGC.jpg
water_and_power
Quote:

Originally Posted by odinthor (Post 8392184)
Hmmm, e_r--good question. [scratches head] Have never heard of prostitution on the second floor (if memory serves, there was a beer-hall for a time on the ground floor).
Wasn't the second floor built to be a theater, and then also used as a courtroom?

The ground floor was originally designed as market stalls. Perhaps each stall-unit had its own stove/heater, vented with a duct which was on the interior for its first-floor length
(so as not to endanger or discommode passers-by), then routed outside at the second floor? :shrug: Just guessing.

Excellent description of the interior of the old city hall building odinthor. Thanks so much.

Opened: 1859 by John Temple as the Market House, a two story brick structure designed to house a city market and his theatre on the second floor.
The theatre was reported to be small and poorly ventilated although the armchairs and benches used for seating were viewed with approval.
It's unknown how long the space was used as a theatre. Temple Theater

At some point, the second floor was divided into attorney offices. (no doubt when the building became city hall)

https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/6...921/2qIjgj.jpg
history of calidornia/google books


Quote:

Originally Posted by odinthor (Post 8392184)
Perhaps the use of flues is why they call them floozies. :runaway:

Place Drum-Sound HERE. ;)

ethereal_reality Nov 28, 2018 6:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GaylordWilshire (Post 8391334)
Frederick seems to have been Fred F. Harris...his father was Fred E. Harris...real estate men.
Hmmm...it seems to have come out with its elements rearranged.

Quote:

Originally Posted by HossC (Post 8391905)
I think we're looking at the back and front of the same house.

Thanks for the follow-up you two. :)
I'm not sure I would have figured out that the postcard = back, the newspaper illus. = front.

It's also quite interesting that Fred Harris' daughter (or son) had sent the postcard with their sentiment.

Flyingwedge Nov 28, 2018 6:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 8390272)

Flyingwedge's 'mystery' house.

I thought the mantle might hold some clues.

https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1...922/JqlaRw.jpg

__


This photo may belong to the same set of images as those in my recent post on that unidentified house. Please note the light fixture on the wall, next to the plates:

http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...psv3mqw8wf.jpg

photCL_555_06_413 at Huntington Digital Library, Ernest Marquez Collection


Isn't this the same light fixture as in your close-up, e_r?

http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...pscwhtwujj.jpg


To see a view of the right side of this room -- with some overlap in the middle -- and another of those light fixtures, click here.

ethereal_reality Nov 28, 2018 7:12 AM

:previous: I'd say it's the same house FW. The light fixtures appear to match.

There's also a touch of art nouveau in the leaded glass of the built-in china cabinets. not unlike the [more exuberant] art nouveau windows in your other photos.

https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/6...923/s6TEIx.jpg
DETAIL

Flyingwedge Nov 28, 2018 7:25 AM

:previous: :) I hadn't noticed that. I was focused on the huge serving dish inside the cabinet!

ethereal_reality Nov 28, 2018 7:30 AM

I was going to make a lame joke about the 'fondue pot' ;)

ethereal_reality Nov 28, 2018 8:09 PM

Ford Tri-Motor Airplane travels 140 miles in 70 minutes for a ten spot.

https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1...923/kfRQwW.jpg
Ebay

https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1...922/DJjo3g.jpg
Ebay

No doubt Maddux Airlines, right? (the seller believes it is)

A bit of history:

"In 1927 Jack L. Maddux, an owner of a Los Angeles Ford and Lincoln car dealership, founded Maddux Air Lines. The airline’s inaugural flight was on September 22, 1927
when the airline’s Ford 4-AT Tri-motor carrying 12 passengers flew from San Diego, California to Los Angeles, California.[1] This flight was to a small dirt landing strip
that would later become Los Angeles International Airport, although the landing strip, called Inglewood Site, was not suitable for the airline, and Jack Maddux chose instead
Rogers Airport, with improved facilities, and later Grand Central Air Terminal in Glendale. Among the passengers were several notables, and although the event was kept
relatively quiet, it served as a publicity act."

Hmmm...there's no way of knowing [for sure] if the photo shows the Inglewood Site....Rogers Airport....or Grand Central Terminal.
The location in the pic looks rather undeveloped. I'd rule out Grand Central.

Could this photograph show the return flight of the inaugural flight in 1927?
_

Beaudry Nov 28, 2018 8:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Scott Charles (Post 8392395)
Wow!

Do you have a link to the full-sized image, Beaudry?

Sure! Here it is in all its 800dpi, 7.2mb glory.

ethereal_reality Nov 28, 2018 8:46 PM

Last night, while trying to find out more about the old city hall [Temple's building in the article below]
I saw the key words 'Cavalry' and '1964' and thought it was referring to the Civil War.

Now I see that it's an ad for a Native Cavalry Co. (with a $260 bounty!)

https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/6...922/SAtdR0.jpg
Los Angeles Star, July 16, 1864

Am I correct in saying it's a posse in search of Native-Americans [Indians].

As for the bounty: Is the $260 for the capture, or killing, of Indians? If so, is it $260 for ea individual...or..:shrug:

odinthor Nov 28, 2018 10:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 8393116)
Last night, while trying to find out more about the old city hall [Temple's building in the article below]
I saw the key words 'Cavalry' and '1964' and thought it was referring to the Civil War.

Now I see that it's an ad for a Native Cavalry Co. (with a $260 bounty!)

https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/6...922/SAtdR0.jpg
Los Angeles Star, July 16, 1864

Am I correct in saying it's a posse in search of Native-Americans [Indians].

As for the bounty: Is the $260 for the capture, or killing, of Indians? If so, is it $260 for ea individual...or..:shrug:

e_r, this is mostly guesswork by me, but: This probably refers to one of the pseudo-military companies which were formed at the time to protect the community from bad guys. For instance, see this from the January 24, 1857, Los Angeles Star: “During the week, Mr. Getman, the City Marshal, called public attention to the present disturbed and dangerous state of society here, inviting all interested in maintaining peace and order to come forward and enroll themselves as a cavalry company, to hold themselves in readiness for immediate service. About a dozen persons responded to the call, by enrolling their names, and placing each a horse or equipments at the disposal of the Marshal. When those persons owning property and engaged in business display such apathy in so vital a matter, no wonder robberies and murders are of so frequent occurrence. The first requirement of society is protection to life and property—without which we need never look for an augmentation of population. This can be secured only by the cooperation of the people of the locality. The Marshal is unceasing in his efforts to bring the guilty to punishment, and deserves well of the community. We understand that one or two convicts, escaped from the State prison, are connected with this band of robbers. On Thursday night, the Sheriff, J.R. Barton, Esq., mustered a company, and went in search of the outlaws who are committing depredations in the neighborhood of San Juan [Capistrano] and other places in the county. We hope these companies will shoot down the ruffians, should they find them. We want no prisoners, to saddle the county with their support for months, winding up with the farce of trial and acquittal.” (Barton, of course, came to a bad end.)

A rival such company--called the Rifle Company--was organized in L.A. in March, 1857. Here's something from the April 4, 1857, issue of the Los Angeles Star: “At an election for officers of this company, held last week, the following gentlemen were chosen to fill the respective offices: Cap[t]ain—W.W. Twist. 1st Lieut., W.D. Brown; first 2nd Lieut.: A. Albright; second 2d Lieut., Henry King. Surgeon, Dr. Carter; Asst. do., Alex. S. Read. 1st Sergeant, Alonzo Waite; 2d, Joseph Warble; 3d, Sydney Waite; 4th, Geo. S. Dillon; 1st Corporal, M. Flashner; 2d, Theo. Wettergren; 3d, Perry Switzer; 4th, Samuel Meyers. Farrier and saddler, H. McLaughlin. Trumpeters, Huestus Smith and Henry Ulyard. The company numbers, besides the above, forty-five privates. The uniform adopted is neat and inexpensive—black pants, blue shirts, and blue caps. The arms are the rifles lately received from the State. The company paraded during the week at the funeral of their deceased member, Mr. H. Wagner, and made a very creditable appearance.”

"Native" in "Native Cavalry Company" probably refers to "us locals" rather than to Indians.

The bounty is likely an inducement paid to each company applicant who is accepted.

"Lieut. Streeter," I conjecture, is frontiersman William Adams Streeter, who married Josefa Valdez, who, though born in Santa Barbara (in 1826?), was confirmed at L.A. Plaza Church in 1830; she married Streeter October 3, 1848, at the Santa Barbara Presidio chapel. Valdez's father was Ramon Jose Antonio Valdez (alias Jose Ramon Antonio Valdez) . . . who happens to be one of the five memoirists in a recently-published book authored by one [checks spelling] Brent C. Dickerson. Josefa's great-grandfather was Eugenio Valdez of the Rivera Expedition. Honorifics such as "Lieut." and "Capt." etc. are to be looked at with suspicion in this era, and not as necessarily betokening actual military rank, current or past, in the U.S. Army.

Let's see . . . Have I beaten this to death yet? [checks] Yeah, looks like it. :D

Scott Charles Nov 28, 2018 11:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Beaudry (Post 8393101)
Sure! Here it is in all its 800dpi, 7.2mb glory.

Thank-you, Beaudry! What a fantastic image! :)

CityBoyDoug Nov 29, 2018 2:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 8393058)
Ford Tri-Motor Airplane travels 140 miles in 70 minutes for a ten spot.

https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1...923/kfRQwW.jpg
Ebay


No doubt Maddux Airlines, right? (the seller believes it is)

A bit of history:

"In 1927 Jack L. Maddux, an owner of a Los Angeles Ford and Lincoln car dealership, founded Maddux Air Lines. The airline’s inaugural flight was on September 22, 1927
when the airline’s Ford 4-AT Tri-motor carrying 12 passengers flew from San Diego, California to Los Angeles, California.[1] This flight was to a small dirt landing strip
that would later become Los Angeles International Airport, although the landing strip, called Inglewood Site, was not suitable for the airline, and Jack Maddux chose instead
Rogers Airport, with improved facilities, and later Grand Central Air Terminal in Glendale. Among the passengers were several notables, and although the event was kept
relatively quiet, it served as a publicity act."

Hmmm...there's no way of knowing [for sure] if the photo shows the Inglewood Site....Rogers Airport....or Grand Central Terminal.
The location in the pic looks rather undeveloped. I'd rule out Grand Central.

Could this photograph show the return flight of the inaugural flight in 1927?
_

Fare in 1927 was $10........that would be $145 in 2018.


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