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-   -   Skyline Pictures (https://skyscraperpage.com/forum//showthread.php?t=201694)

isaidso May 9, 2013 11:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mojeda101 (Post 6121174)
LA just lacks the concentration of skyscrapers. It's spread out. Downtown, Wilshire, Koreatown, Century City, UCLA, Hollywood. It has "mini" skylines all over.

Here's a perfect example:

That's true. Toronto does that as well. There's the main cluster then about 4-5 mini clusters, Mississauga being the largest secondary one. Vancouver is beginning to form a significant secondary cluster in Burnaby. Are there any other cities in the US with multiple clusters? Atlanta maybe? I suppose New York has downtown, midtown, Jersey City, and even a small one in Brooklyn.

Mississauga in the foreground, downtown Toronto 28km in the distance (That's 17 miles for you folks still using British Imperial Units)
http://i262.photobucket.com/albums/i...psc12f9a7a.jpg

caltrane74 May 9, 2013 11:42 PM

Los Angeles is one of my favorite skylines in the United States.

isaidso May 9, 2013 11:46 PM

LA may be poly-centric in nature, but a metro of 14 million should have a main cluster much bigger than that. That said, I agree with 'Caltrane'. The LA skyline looks good. It's in my top 5 US skylines.

softee May 9, 2013 11:55 PM

^^ Downtown Toronto is more like 30 km (19 miles) from Mississauga city centre.

isaidso May 10, 2013 12:00 AM

Montreal - Quebec


http://farm7.staticflickr.com/6175/6...fa917c47_b.jpg
By Wally Baba on Flickr

http://farm5.staticflickr.com/4097/4...71670836_b.jpg
Downtown par le calmar, sur Flickr

http://i453.photobucket.com/albums/q...g?t=1349746301
Courtesy of Wally Baba

isaidso May 10, 2013 12:01 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by softee (Post 6122237)
^^ Downtown Toronto is more like 30 km (19 miles) from Mississauga city centre.

OK. I used Google Maps and eye balled it with the scale. Online seems to say 28 km or 17 miles so I'll go with that.

tdawg May 10, 2013 1:10 AM

This "small cluster in Brooklyn" you mention. Are you referring to Downtown Brooklyn? It's hardly a small cluster.

mhays May 10, 2013 1:40 AM

Seattle with Bellevue, St. Louis with Clayton, San Francisco with San Jose and Oakland (both also historic cores)... Come to think of it, all of these are more urban than Burnaby or Mississaugua, regardless of how many highrises they have, and despite better transit than typical in the US. New Westminster and North Vancouver are more urban examples.

JonathanGRR May 10, 2013 1:49 AM

Grand Rapid's (MI) Grand River flooding before(December)-and-after:

http://sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphoto...72650799_n.jpg
Dave Guthrie, Grand Rapids Press

fflint May 10, 2013 3:02 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mhays (Post 6122368)
San Francisco with San Jose and Oakland (both also historic cores)... Come to think of it, all of these are more urban than Burnaby or Mississaugua...

Speaking of Oakland...

http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8174/8...956b50ab_b.jpg
CLCsPics on flickr

Yackemflaber69 May 10, 2013 4:06 AM

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3187/...281bf68c6f.jpg
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3187/...281bf68c6f.jpg

Flint, MI

/

isaidso May 10, 2013 4:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tdawg (Post 6122320)
This "small cluster in Brooklyn" you mention. Are you referring to Downtown Brooklyn? It's hardly a small cluster.

Yes. How many 100m+ buildings does Brooklyn have? I tried doing some digging, but it's hard finding Brooklyn specific data.

brickell May 10, 2013 3:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by isaidso (Post 6122204)
Are there any other cities in the US with multiple clusters?

South Florida - Miami, Fort Lauderdale, Coral Gables, Sunny Isles, Miami Beach

SLO May 10, 2013 3:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by brickell (Post 6123010)
South Florida - Miami, Fort Lauderdale, Coral Gables, Sunny Isles, Miami Beach


Yes, Miami has lots. Also Dallas, Houston, Atlanta, KC, even Phoenix has two. Most major cities have some suburban office districts like those.

mhays May 10, 2013 3:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by isaidso (Post 6122575)
Yes. How many 100m+ buildings does Brooklyn have? I tried doing some digging, but it's hard finding Brooklyn specific data.

It seems to have a few underway and a decent cluster existing. More importantly, its baseline density is also pretty high, both in "downtown" proper and around it.

suburbanite May 10, 2013 3:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mhays (Post 6122368)
Seattle with Bellevue, St. Louis with Clayton, San Francisco with San Jose and Oakland (both also historic cores)... Come to think of it, all of these are more urban than Burnaby or Mississaugua, regardless of how many highrises they have, and despite better transit than typical in the US. New Westminster and North Vancouver are more urban examples.

Oakland developed alongside San Francisco as an independent city, more comparable to Hamilton-Toronto than Mississauga regardless of distance. Mississauga is literally a suburb that built a dense core in the last 20 years. This hasn't really occured anywhere in the U.S. on the same scale as far as I'm aware, so it's urbanity is hard to compare to these established cities.

mhays May 10, 2013 3:39 PM

Not on the same scale, true. But real urbanity has certainly been built in the past 20 years. In my area, Bellevue is our (one) suburban highrise district. It has lots of holes and needs another boom or two to be cohesive, but urban formats have been the norm since the late 80s, with buildings out to the lot lines. This is on a canvas of typical 1950s suburbia.

Nite May 11, 2013 6:19 AM

http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7422/8...8bd905f4_b.jpg
Toronto

Boquillas May 11, 2013 7:17 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by isaidso (Post 6122243)
OK. I used Google Maps and eye balled it with the scale. Online seems to say 28 km or 17 miles so I'll go with that.

It's a shade over 13 miles as the crow flies, according to the ruler tool on Google Earth.

tech12 May 11, 2013 7:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by isaidso (Post 6122204)
Are there any other cities in the US with multiple clusters? Atlanta maybe? I suppose New York has downtown, midtown, Jersey City, and even a small one in Brooklyn.

As far as San Francisco goes, aside from downtown SF, the other sizable highrise clusters in the Bay Area are:

Downtown Oakland (about 6 or so miles from downtown SF, as the crow flies)
Downtown San Jose (about 40 miles from downtown SF, as the crow flies)

And then there are the the small highrise/midrise clusters in various suburbs like Emeryville, South San Francisco, San Mateo, Palo Alto, Berkeley, Santa Clara, etc. Most of those are just a handful of midrises with maybe one or two short highrises poking out, but they do stand out from the sea of lowrises. There's nothing even close to a Mississauga-sized suburban skyline here though.


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