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Chuckaluck May 22, 2014 8:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 5877269)
Pepper trees in Sonora Town.

http://imageshack.us/a/img594/8924/e...ypcofolver.jpg
ebay

What's most interesting about this cabinet card is that mansion peeking through the pepper tree branches.
_

http://catalog.library.ca.gov/exlibr...PS88E6HJN7.jpghttp://catalog.library.ca.gov/exlibr...PS88E6HJN7.jpg




Pepper trees were once the definition of ubiquitous in So Cal.


1907 - Fifth St. looking east from Spring St. At right, folks congregating under pepper tree. Hitching post or street marker?
http://jpg3.lapl.org/pics35/00067391.jpghttp://jpg3.lapl.org/pics35/00067391.jpg


1918 - Pasadena, exact location unk.
http://catalog.library.ca.gov/exlibr...7GRBUJ8YED.jpghttp://catalog.library.ca.gov/exlibr...7GRBUJ8YED.jpg




Pepper Tree lane - H Bowl (Late '20s ?)
http://catalog.library.ca.gov/exlibr...7AF5TJF1QN.jpghttp://catalog.library.ca.gov/exlibr...7AF5TJF1QN.jpg


Sunset Blvd. at or near Argyle ('20s -'30s?)
http://jpg1.lapl.org/pics16/00007745.jpghttp://jpg1.lapl.org/pics16/00007745.jpg


Alhambra
http://jpg3.lapl.org/pics03/00021093.jpghttp://jpg3.lapl.org/pics03/00021093.jpg

Beverly Hills, circa '26
http://jpg2.lapl.org/pics20/00019538.jpghttp://jpg2.lapl.org/pics20/00019538.jpg

Center Street (?)
http://jpg3.lapl.org/pics35/00067262.jpghttp://jpg3.lapl.org/pics35/00067262.jpg

NBC-adjacent pepper trees? '40s
http://jpg1.lapl.org/00101/00101892.jpghttp://jpg1.lapl.org/00101/00101892.jpg


1938 - Pepper Tree Shop - 1835 Cahuenga Blvd.
http://jpg1.lapl.org/00099/00099000.jpghttp://jpg1.lapl.org/00099/00099000.jpg

1960 - Brooklyn Avenue
http://catalog.library.ca.gov/exlibr...VC5NT7UUJA.jpghttp://catalog.library.ca.gov/exlibr...VC5NT7UUJA.jpg



1952 - Rear of Beaudry Ave. residence.
http://catalog.library.ca.gov/exlibr...XEFYDQN21N.jpghttp://catalog.library.ca.gov/exlibr...XEFYDQN21N.jpg

1900 - Santa Barbara Street Car rounds the bend amidst pepper trees.
http://catalog.library.ca.gov/exlibr...KHX2E22U97.jpghttp://catalog.library.ca.gov/exlibr...KHX2E22U97.jpg



More on pepper trees: http://www.kcet.org/updaily/socal_fo...pper-tree.html

CityBoyDoug May 22, 2014 8:38 PM

Necker Knobs.....
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 6587861)
OK, this is for you car aficionados. Why are these steering wheel knobs called suicide knobs?

http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/800...0/845/8u04.jpg
http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/800...0/835/zifc.jpg

ebay
__

Back in the day I recall these being called ''Necker Knobs''. They allowed Mr. Ducktail to steer with one hand while the other hand was feeling around south-of -the- equator.
Today they're illegal in CA...as are switchblade pocket knives.

CA Code: PC 21510 - deals strictly with switchblades, making it a misdemeanor to carry upon a person, or possess in a car, or in a public place, sell, loan, transfer, give, expose for sale, a switchblade knife.


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v4...ps4f790a58.jpgebay

HossC May 22, 2014 8:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Martin Pal (Post 6587657)

Missing on the corner there is Toff's Coffee Shop. From the previous photos I posted (HERE) we know it was there from at least 1956 to 1977. (I saw Star Wars at the Chinese Theatre and I do not remember Toff's Coffee Shop at all then or afterwards.

Here's an another picture of Toff's dating from roughly the middle of year range given above. The Jack Lemmon/Virna Lisi movie "How to Murder Your Wife" was released in January 1965, which means the blue car is quite an early Mustang.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...5.jpg~original
paonthefly.com

Martin Pal May 22, 2014 10:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 6587882)

I can read as far as, "...it is believed that they have eloped with Mrs. Letourneau's ten year old son..." (heh!) Hmmm...robbing the cradle seems to be a thing with people named Letourneau...maybe she's related to Mary Kay?

__________________

Quote:

Originally Posted by CityBoyDoug (Post 6587945)
Back in the day I recall these being called ''Necker Knobs''. They allowed Mr. Ducktail to steer with one hand while the other hand was feeling around south-of -the- equator.

With or without a companion, I assume!

Martin Pal May 22, 2014 10:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by KevinW (Post 6587752)
I looked up Brooks Travel Service and found one on Hollywood Blvd. at The Circle. Thing is, The Circle is in Hollywood, FL, not CA. So this is a nice picture of Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood FL

Lol! Now it all makes sense! Thanks, KevinW!

GaylordWilshire May 22, 2014 10:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 6562711)
Have we seen this residence before? I searched 'Steny' and nothing came up.

http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/xq90/841/1yuy.jpg
Ryerson & Burnham Archives/Art Institute of Chicago http://digital-libraries.saic.edu/cd...d/10773/rec/35

Now that I look at it, it does seem very familiar. (I might have commented on that odd chimney flue)
-note the oil wells in the distance at left.
__


https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-x...EV2chimney.jpg


Another shot of the STERRY house, which was at the northwest corner of Wilshire and Coronado from 1897 until about 1924. The lot was then given over to automotive uses until 1952, when Welton Becket's Remington-Rand showroom went up and remains to this day. I've now completed my full history of the house, which can be read here: http://wilshireboulevardhouses.blogs...boulevard.html

ethereal_reality May 22, 2014 10:42 PM

:previous: Excellent job on the Sterry House GW. Don't you think Judge Sterry looks like Jules Verne?
__

Earl Boebert May 22, 2014 11:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 6587861)
OK, this is for you car aficionados. Why are these steering wheel knobs called suicide knobs?

Because of the possible consequences of one coming unattached in the middle of a high-speed turn. Which is why they are illegal in a lot of states.

Cheers,

Earl

(Who fondly remembers the days of bench seats, suicide knobs and the Berkeley Hills.)

GaylordWilshire May 22, 2014 11:39 PM

:previous:

I've always heard that it had to do with the possibility of the knob getting caught in a sleeve...

HossC May 23, 2014 12:03 AM

:previous:

From a www.jalopyjournal.com thread titled "Why are suicide knobs called so?":

"There are a few reasons: One, they will sometimes grab a shirt sleeve and get snagged up right in the middle of a turn. Two: in the case of bump steer, they'll just about knock your thumb off and shove it down your throat for ya. Three: They've been known to pick the worst possible moment to break off, like right in the middle of a hard turn. None of those scenarios is very pleasant."

They also seem to be known as brodie/brody knobs and spinner knobs. The thread contains various accounts of people breaking thumbs and wrists on them!

Tourmaline May 23, 2014 12:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Chuckaluck (Post 6587935)


Per source, Marinello's Beauty Shop was a precursor for Marinello's Beauty School. Marinello's appears to be going strong in LA. http://photos.lapl.org/carlweb/jsp/F...Number=5092510

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marinel...ools_of_Beauty


Marinello's site states it had a presence downtown in 1905. http://www.marinello.com/history.aspx Hard to discern much from accompanying image:
"Marinello School Downtown Los Angeles, circa 1905"
http://www.marinello.com/images/img/broadway-7.jpghttp://www.marinello.com/images/img/broadway-7.jpg

1938 - More Marinello's at Seventh and Broadway. Dig the four-sided street sign.
http://jpg3.lapl.org/pics36/00067824.jpghttp://jpg3.lapl.org/pics36/00067824.jpg

More '38 Marinello - http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/co...d/94197/rec/23
http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/utils/...ook&DMROTATE=0http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/utils/...ook&DMROTATE=0
http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/utils/...ook&DMROTATE=0http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/utils/...ook&DMROTATE=0



http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/utils/...ook&DMROTATE=0http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/utils/...ook&DMROTATE=0
http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/utils/...ook&DMROTATE=0http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/utils/...ook&DMROTATE=0
http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/utils/...ook&DMROTATE=0http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/utils/...ook&DMROTATE=0

Smile?
http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/utils/...ook&DMROTATE=0http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/utils/...ook&DMROTATE=0
http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/utils/...ook&DMROTATE=0http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/utils/...ook&DMROTATE=0

Flyingwedge May 23, 2014 5:15 AM

Southern California Iron and Steel Company
 
http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...7.jpg~original
1922 LA City Directory @ Fold3.com

Stationery:
http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...7.jpg~original
scripophily.com -- http://www.scripophily.com/webcart/v...ndsteelvig.jpg

c. Mid-twenties; note So Cal Iron & Steel to the left of the Maxwell House building:
http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...7.jpg~original
LAPL -- http://jpg2.lapl.org/pics25/00047095.jpg (previously posted by BRR -- http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...ostcount=12895)

August 18, 1922 -- Although the writing on the photo does not include "Iron and," it's the same company:
http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...9.jpg~originalhttp://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...2.jpg~original
Flyingwedge family photo (left end of bottom photo connects to right end of top photo)

Of the three people not standing, the one in the middle is my grandfather less than a month after he turned 20 years old. At this point he ran the charging car, which picked up boxes of scrap and put them in the furnace. A couple years later my grandfather's younger brother had the same job: 7 days a week, 12 hours a day, for 36 cents an hour (luckily it only cost a nickel to ride the streetcar to work). Southern California Iron and Steel moved to Huntington Park and in 1929 became part of Bethlehem Steel (http://books.google.com/books?id=fbr...eel%22&f=false).

The area around E. 4th and Mateo today; that's the same ex-Maxwell House building below "E 4th Pl":
http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...6.jpg~original
Bing

CityBoyDoug May 23, 2014 5:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Flyingwedge (Post 6588607)

Of the three people not standing, the one in the middle is my grandfather less than a month after he turned 20 years old. At this point he ran the charging car, which picked up boxes of scrap and put them in the furnace. A couple years later my grandfather's younger brother had the same job: 7 days a week, 12 hours a day, for 36 cents an hour (luckily it only cost a nickel to ride the streetcar to work). Southern California Iron and Steel moved to Huntington Park and in 1929 became part of Bethlehem Steel

Seven days a week? That's hard work. Thanks for posting these personal photos and information. Most interesting.

Martin Pal May 23, 2014 5:34 PM

Red Fox Restaurant, Vine Street, Capitol Records Building
 
The Red Fox Restaurant Vine Street, north of Hollywood Blvd. near the Capitol Records Bldg., 1950’s.

http://www.kulfoto.com/pic1/0001/0016/B7T2515589.jpgKULfoto

jg6544 May 23, 2014 5:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 6587861)

I always understood it was because, if you got into an accident and the steering wheel column didn't crush your chest first, these little gems could crack your skull open. I don't recall seeing these things after the late 1950s.

Martin Pal May 23, 2014 6:04 PM

Holiday Bowl
 
I found two of the same photo, but they have different color hues:

Holiday Bowl, Los Angeles, 1958.
(Jack Laxer on VLA & Aplusd)


At first I just thought this another great coffee shop from the googie era, but on looking for the location I have discovered this place was not only a coffee shop, but encompassed a pool hall, bowling alley and a bar. It also has historical importance, was designated a landmark, but ultimately has morphed into a drugstore and the coffee shop itself is now a Starbucks. Some fascinating historical info:

Located at 3730 Crenshaw Boulevard, the Holiday Bowl was important in the desegregation of Los Angeles and served an Anglo American, African American, and Japanese American clientele. The coffee shop served a huge cross section of ethnic dishes: Japanese (saifun, yakisoba, donburi, udon), Chinese (a vast assortment of chow mein, pork noodles, foo yong) and black Southern (hot links, grits, salmon patties, short ribs, biscuits and gravy). And hamburgers.

The Bowl was built by Japanese entrepreneurs as a combination bowling alley, pool hall, bar and coffee shop in 1958 and served Crenshaw's Japanese residents who "had not long before suffered Manzanar's internment camps and a blanket racial ban by the American Bowling Congress."

A Los Angeles Times magazine story noted: "Once haunted at 4 a.m. by swing-shift aerospace workers and nighthawk Central Avenue jazz musicians, the Holiday Bowl, like Leimert Park to its south, remains a concrete expression of community in an era when the whole notion of community has been raised to the level of abstraction."

A 1999 L.A. Weekly story said, "Holiday speaks of Crenshaw’s bright, enduring middle-class dreams, with its ’50s-inspired orange-and-green décor and giant plate-glass window that affords a grand view of Baldwin Hills to the south."

The owner said he took pride in Holiday’s staying power, in its history, and the fact that it was designed by Armet & Davis, "the architectural firm that popularized Googie-style coffee shops and turned diners like Holiday and the nearby Wich Stand into zig-zaggy emblems of L.A. optimism." Helen Liu Fong was the designer at Armet & Davis who is credited with designing the Holiday Bowl. He said the building was not damaged during the 1992 Los Angeles riots and that people bowled that night.

The above is culled from several sources including these:

Holiday Bowl History Project:
http://www.holidaybowlcrenshaw.com/community.html

Crenshaw Community and the History of the Holiday Bowl/KCET:
http://www.kcet.org/socal/departures...iday-bowl.html

Lots of b&w pictures on the Library of Congress website that look like they were taken when it was vacated or closed, of the exterior and interior:
www.loc.gov/pictures/item/ca3275/

CityBoyDoug May 23, 2014 8:31 PM

The Mai Tai.....lots of rum and fruit juice.
 
Donn Beach, at his first bar in Hollywood in 1934.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v4...ps2e74e3f1.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v4...ps6498a7ca.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v4...ps41698470.jpghttp://img.photobucket.com/albums/v4...ps8e21e02c.jpg


All photos: Toque.com

Ernest Raymond Beaumont Gantt, who renamed himself Donn Beach was considered the most influential bartender of the time. He created seventy different cocktails, the best known of which is perhaps the Mai Tai.

DON THE BEACHCOMBER’S MAI TAI
1 oz gold rum
1 ½ oz Meyer’s Plantation rum
1 oz grapefruit juice
¾ oz lime juice
½ oz Cointreau
¼ oz Falernum
6 drops Pernod or Herbsaint
dash of Angostura bitters
Shake well with crushed ice
Pour unstrained into a double old-fashioned glass
Garnish with 4 mint sprigs

Sonny☼LA May 23, 2014 10:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jg6544 (Post 6589361)
I always understood it was because, if you got into an accident and the steering wheel column didn't crush your chest first, these little gems could crack your skull open. I don't recall seeing these things after the late 1950s.

That's always what I heard - the US has some pretty strict regs regarding hard things pointing at you on an instrument panel. Check out the toggle switches on a modern Mini Cooper - ridiculous fat ugly guards between each one. I love that the necker knob not only has multiple ways to help you cause an accident but also impales you when you do.

Sonny☼LA May 23, 2014 10:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by FredH (Post 6587062)
Sonny LA - Looking at the picture, I think you are right. However, isn't that dirt path about all that is left of the old Teed Street?

Fred - I don't even think there ever was a paved Teed Street. It was on quite a few maps back in the day but I don't think we ever found a photo of it in use as a real thoroughfare. Perhaps wishful thinking from the Teed family boosters. :shrug:

I like little Teed Street...always reminded me of a certain rotund Mr. Tweed from a bit further east.

ethereal_reality May 23, 2014 11:44 PM

http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/102...0/837/bdzp.jpg
posted by FlyingWedge

This photograph of your grandfather as a 20 year old man is a treasure. Thanks for sharing it with us FW.
__


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