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Tourmaline Mar 22, 2014 11:14 PM


Spoiler Alert?


Recent NLA earthquake coverage may make this image timely. Without giving up too much information, some earthquakes can have entertainment value, especially when they are accompanied by the likes of Gable, Tracy and MacDonald. (Gable lives to make more movies) And - there is a chance to win a new car, that is hopefully undamaged. :rolleyes: http://hdl.huntington.org/cdm/single.../id/2858/rec/1

http://hdl.huntington.org/utils/ajax...XT=&DMROTATE=0http://hdl.huntington.org/utils/ajax...XT=&DMROTATE=0
http://hdl.huntington.org/utils/ajax...XT=&DMROTATE=0http://hdl.huntington.org/utils/ajax...XT=&DMROTATE=0


http://st-listas.20minutos.es/images...jpg?1392102333http://st-listas.20minutos.es/images...jpg?1392102333http://legendaryclarkgable.com/image...anFran03_V.jpghttp://legendaryclarkgable.com/image...anFran03_V.jpg

Unclear whether the Bride Walks out on the earthquake or the long lines waiting to see her movie :koko:?
http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-0tLJ-3ezkp...2.07.26+PM.pnghttp://3.bp.blogspot.com/-0tLJ-3ezkp...2.07.26+PM.png



In what home were See's Candies made?
http://hdl.huntington.org/utils/ajax...XT=&DMROTATE=0http://hdl.huntington.org/utils/ajax...XT=&DMROTATE=0
http://hdl.huntington.org/utils/ajax...XT=&DMROTATE=0http://hdl.huntington.org/utils/ajax...XT=&DMROTATE=0

Flyingwedge Mar 22, 2014 11:29 PM

1601 Industrial Street: A Former World Champion
 
These are the buildings on the eastern half of the north side of the block on Industrial Street, between Alameda and Mill. The black-fronted building is 1581, the
building to its right has a sign over its entrance showing it's 1601 Industrial St., and the building at far right (brown roof) has a sign showing it's 1717-19 Industrial St:
http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...1.jpg~original
Bing

The LA County Assessor shows just two buildings on the block (eastern half in yellow is all 1567 Industrial), with each building having five "improvements,"
but no indication as to which is which:
http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...5.jpg~original
LA County Assessor

Although 1601 Industrial St. is relatively anonymous today, when it was built it had a claim to fame:
http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...8.jpg~original

http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...a.jpg~original
The building on the right is the one with the brown roof in the aerial view above.

http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...a.jpg~original
GSV

The girders:
http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...b.jpg~original
Los Angeles, The Old and The New (J. E. Scott, 1911) @ HathiTrust -- http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?i...iew=1up;seq=44

Carl Leonardt lived for a time at 2 Chester Place; it seems he also built the streets and sidewalks at Chester Place (http://archive.org/stream/doheny1968...8msms_djvu.txt).

To see Floyd B. Bariscale's photos of the outside of 2 Chester Place, click here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/7294653...n/photostream/

To read about the interior decoration of 2 Chester Place and see three photos of same, click here: http://books.google.com/books?id=rAE...onardt&f=false

To read about the 1910 death of Leonardt's son in an auto accident on Adams Boulevard near 13th Avenue, click here: http://cdnc.ucr.edu/cgi-bin/cdnc?a=d&d=LAH19100811.2.2

HossC Mar 23, 2014 12:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Martin Pal (Post 6507013)

Incidentally, the (1985) apartment complex, The Crescent, currently occupying that location, boasts an amenity I don't recall being offered anywhere else before, plus a "new" one!

http://www.thecrescentapts.com/

Exclusive Amenities in West Hollywood

Fitness center overlooking the resort-style swimming pool.
Poolside wet bar, BBQ grills, and outdoor movie theater.
Outdoor Wi-Fi cafe and fire pit lounge. We are making the
transition to a Smoke-Free community. Please see the lease
policy for details on our newest amenity...fresh air.

Here's a picture of their outdoor movie theater. The screen has a great 3D effect which makes it look like the picture is in front of the heater on the right. Either that or the Photoshop artist missed it when they added the movie image.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...tsTheater1.jpg
www.thecrescentapts.com

Borrowing one of GW's recent images, I decided to screen a different movie. I can't believe all those empty seats with 'Cry Danger' being shown :).

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...tsTheater2.jpg


------------------


Quote:

Originally Posted by Blaster (Post 6507112)

Is anybody disturbed by the miniature passenger in the blue shirt in the left front window? Compare his head size to that of the people around and behind him. A trick caused by sun reflection on the glass of the window? Or perhaps captured on film at last, an actual leprechaun.

Wouldn't a leprechaun be wearing a green shirt? :)

unihikid Mar 23, 2014 12:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tourmaline (Post 6507196)

Wig-wag may be able to confirm,but didn't PE have a trail of trains/cars for the rose parade every new years day?

Tourmaline Mar 23, 2014 1:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HossC (Post 6507334)


Wouldn't a leprechaun be wearing a green shirt? :)

Not necessarily. May depend upon the photographer's film choice and leprechaun's mood.


Noirish Busch Gardens. Undated
http://jpg1.lapl.org/pics31/00035095.jpghttp://jpg1.lapl.org/pics31/00035095.jpg

Retired_in_Texas Mar 23, 2014 2:44 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GaylordWilshire (Post 6507111)
I guess I'm just not ready to throw in the towel on the state of the world, of design and luxury. It's all out there, preserved in some places if not all, and in incredible new things, cars, houses, public building etc etc. Seek it out. (Like one's youth, the old stuff ain't ever coming back.) As far as today's cars go--functionally far less useful? More practical, safer, lower-maintenance, and more durable cars are less useful than a 1962 Cadillac, say? Now this is novel. But I'll stick to architecture...



Like these century-old-examples?

http://media.nola.com/home_impact/ph...93dd_large.jpghttp://www.americanbungalow.com/wp-c...Image_0002.jpghttp://www.americanbungalow.com/wp-c...Image_0003.jpg
New Orleans/Florida/Washington State

http://www.americanbungalow.com/wp-c...Image_0003.jpghttp://www.americanbungalow.com/wp-c...Image_0006.jpghttp://housesofminneapolis.com/house...ngalow_007.jpg
Atlanta/New Hampshire/Minneapolis

https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-Q...ascraftman.jpghttps://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-w...hoenixbung.jpghttps://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-Q...2520PM.bmp.jpg
Dallas/Phoenix x2/Colorado Springs

Hmm, examples that could have come from the Sears catalog between 1908 and 1940. Elegance Fail!

http://www.searsarchives.com/homes/1933-1940.htm

Between 1908 and 1940 Sears sold some 70,000 homes in kit form.

And yes Gaylord less functional automobiles. More reliable perhaps, but none the less with less functionality. Anytime an average size person cannot sit in the back seat of a so called luxury car without their knees bumping the front seats and one's head bumps the roof, it is less functional. Passenger capacity is also a lessening of functionality. Just bought a 2014 Chrysler 300C with all the high tech junk available. Bought that instead of Lincoln or Cadillac because they were worse in overall passenger comfort. I don't buy imports of any nature because I don't want the associated maintenance hassles from crummy parts support for dealers. Safer? Possibly, but one thing is for sure no one wants me hitting their 2014 anything sedan with one of my 6,000 pound '76 Lincoln Mark IVs moving at 70-75 mph. I'll survive, they won't!

Those Who Squirm! Mar 23, 2014 2:57 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CityBoyDoug (Post 6497364)
My car interior is white leather so I don't usually eat in the car. Ya know what I mean....a few spots of ketchup splattered across the upholstery always looks.... suspicious. If a cop sees that he might want to look in the trunk.

Anyhow, when the conversation turned to dine-in-your-car restaurants, wasn't the allusion to the places that used to exist where a waitress (usually on skates) would bring you a tray which was fastened to your car door? She'd take your order and bring it to you as well, so it was full service, IIRC. (I'm a little too young to have seen these places except in old movies.) As for the roller skates, it almost sounds like a cliched stereotype, but if you stop to think about it I'm not sure how else those waitresses could have done their jobs.

Still, even then I wouldn't have wanted to eat in the car, if my interior was white leather.

Retired_in_Texas Mar 23, 2014 3:02 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jg6544 (Post 6507140)
In addition to the design, the fixtures, and the staff, what made stores of this era (and into the 1950s) so elegant was the minimalist approach to merchandise display on the sales floor. In stores of the caliber of I. Magnin, Bullocks Wilshire, or Neiman-Marcus in Dallas, very little was actually on display - only a selection of the merchandise. To find something in the correct size, the customer had to ask a sales associate, whose job it was to "sell" the customer on what he or she was seeking and more. On the really elegant floors of these stores, there was no merchandise on display at all. it was modeled for the customer under the supervision of a sales associate who, ideally, knew the customer, her tastes, her size, and what her price range was. Now, everything is just slapped out on racks or, worse yet, on tables for people to paw over. I'd rather shop on the internet.

You pretty much nailed it. There has always been low end department stores which one might describe as "stack and rummage" merchandisers. Actually J.C. Penney pretty much fell into that category until they went a bit upscale in the 1960s. Sears and Montgomery-Ward certainly fell in that category, though being broad scope merchandisers. The shopping mall came along and with it casual shopping with late night hours and that spelled the end of high end elegant department stores. Bermuda shorts and flip-flops were just not compatible!

Those Who Squirm! Mar 23, 2014 3:10 AM

I just have to ask: I've heard of so-called "midget auto races" in the late 1940s-early 1950s. Were these contests between normally-statured drivers in scaled-down cars, or between little people in regular cars, or between little people in scaled-down cars?

Quote:

Originally Posted by GaylordWilshire (Post 6498935)
:previous:

Quite a gathering of Fords in the river... a '53 (or possibly a-4), a '54, a '53 Merc, a '49 Ford, a '52 Ford, and another '53 Merc....


Have we seen Jack Landon's L.A.-built clown cars here before?

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-a...852%2520AM.jpghttps://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-T...2520AM.bmp.jpg
Looks like the Pacific Tank Company in the background--the plant was down at 4820 S Santa Fe and appears to be gone now. At right Landon appears to be near the Hoover curve of Wilshire.

https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-C...2520AM.bmp.jpg

More of the story at the blog Pepito and Joanne.

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-r...2520AM.bmp.jpgPepito and Joanne

https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-W...2520AM.bmp.jpgGoogle Books

Pics LAPL/The Old Motor


Retired_in_Texas Mar 23, 2014 4:14 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Those Who Squirm (Post 6507444)
Anyhow, when the conversation turned to dine-in-your-car restaurants, wasn't the allusion to the places that used to exist where a waitress (usually on skates) would bring you a tray which was fastened to your car door? She'd take your order and bring it to you as well, so it was full service, IIRC. (I'm a little too young to have seen these places except in old movies.) As for the roller skates, it almost sounds like a cliched stereotype, but if you stop to think about it I'm not sure how else those waitresses could have done their jobs.

Still, even then I wouldn't have wanted to eat in the car, if my interior was white leather.

Only the drive-in burger joints with huge parking areas had car hops on roller skates which meant most car hops were afoot. The last one of the roller skating car hops I recall seeing was in 1963 in Pensacola, Florida. Believe it or not it was a McDonalds.

Wig-Wag Mar 23, 2014 4:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Those Who Squirm (Post 6507462)
I just have to ask: I've heard of so-called "midget auto races" in the late 1940s-early 1950s. Were these contests between normally-statured drivers in scaled-down cars, or between little people in regular cars, or between little people in scaled-down cars?

TWS: For a brief history of this sport which originated in Los Angeles, see:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Midget_car_racing

And: http://thistlegroup.net/whvn/midgets/other/index.htm

And for early video see:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XA6kbzPJg5I

Cheers,
Jack

Those Who Squirm! Mar 23, 2014 5:28 AM

It's surprising how back then, apparently, they seem to have changed the license plate colors nearly every year. That said, from the picture
shown here, how do we know we are looking at 1933 plates, and not '35 or '37 which are broadly similar in color? At least, I can't get a
good enough image of this picture on my screen to tell definitively.

What a shame the Greyhound ad is too small to read, as well! Fans of old movies will recognize the bus model
from It Happened One Night, in which the lead characters board a Greyhound bus in Miami, bound for NYC.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Chuckaluck (Post 6501831)
http://imgzoom.cdlib.org/Converter?i...0&w=1030&h=643http://imgzoom.cdlib.org/Converter?i...0&w=1030&h=643



:previous:



Borrowing from HGraham's '33 or '39 empirical observation, I am inclined to agree with the '33 crowd.

The prime indicator of date (for me) might be a contemporaneous newspaper ad, review or playbill of the "world premier." It may be far from common for a live performance to be one show only, but it has been known to happen on Broadway and plenty of High Schools, so why not Ocean Ave? For all we know, the show was preempted when the Navy unexpectedly canceled all shore leave. Come to think of it, Long Beach's world premier could have had a loose but novel plot line involving three sailors on 24 hour shore leave. With just the right musical numbers and a different Port City, it might have inspired . . . ? Well never mind.

Respecting license plate dates, I assume the conclusion is based on shape rather than issuing numbers and possibly color, since previous Long Beach imagery has included many out-of-State plates. Bus shapes are not necessarily determinative of date.

If the image is from '33, there is no obvious earthquake damage. Either it has been quickly swept up or this area escaped with easily remedied damage. It is also possible that the photo was taken pre-March 10, even though this includes a world premier banner for an event many weeks in the future.

Another observation concerning one photo's caption of the Bank being open. For those keeping score, the '33 LBQuake struck on a Friday at approximately 5:55 PM. That date was also part of a 3-day bank Holiday declared by the Gov. It has been said that the bank Holiday may have spared a few Long Beach'ers who might have been conducting banking or spending their money at other businesses - from serious injury or worse. We will never know. http://ladailymirror.com/2011/08/26/...ch-quake-1933/


If anyone's interested, "Of Mice and Men" was released in - 1939
http://www.pacificelectric.org/wp-co...ch-4-18-39.jpghttp://www.pacificelectric.org/wp-co...ch-4-18-39.jpg



http://www.worldlicenceplates.com/jp...S_CAXX_GI2.jpghttp://www.worldlicenceplates.com/jp...S_CAXX_GI2.jpg

http://www.atticpaper.com/prodimages.../greyhound.jpghttp://www.atticpaper.com/prodimages.../greyhound.jpg


ProphetM Mar 23, 2014 7:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Retired_in_Texas (Post 6507421)
And yes Gaylord less functional automobiles. More reliable perhaps, but none the less with less functionality. Anytime an average size person cannot sit in the back seat of a so called luxury car without their knees bumping the front seats and one's head bumps the roof, it is less functional.

While true, passenger space is not the only measure of functionality. Modern cars are much more functional in many other ways. That a car works for much longer, with less downtime for repairs, is perhaps the very definition of more functional.

Quote:

Possibly, but one thing is for sure no one wants me hitting their 2014 anything sedan with one of my 6,000 pound '76 Lincoln Mark IVs moving at 70-75 mph. I'll survive, they won't!
That's quite doubtful. Your car would be in better shape than theirs, but you would not. In any crash the energy of movement must be dissipated. In a newer, more crushable car, that energy is purposely directed into deforming the body of the car outside the passenger compartment, with airbags taking over as the remaining energy reaches the passengers. In an older, more rigid car, the energy is dissipated more directly into you, as your body is deformed by the seatbelts and/or smashed against the interior of the car. Modern car design is very bad for cars, but much, much better for the people riding in them.

Speaking of things on wheels:

Quote:

Originally Posted by Blaster (Post 6507112)
Quote:

Originally Posted by unihikid (Post 5955798)
a few pages ago we were talking about the culver city/ivy sub station.I dont think this photo has been posted before but its a nice color shot.Im surprised that a park is at a substation.
http://i292.photobucket.com/albums/m...r-Junction.jpg photo by pehs

Is anybody disturbed by the miniature passenger in the blue shirt in the left front window? Compare his head size to that of the people around and behind him. A trick caused by sun reflection on the glass of the window? Or perhaps captured on film at last, an actual leprechaun.

Light is coming in from the side doorway, shining on the back half of the boy's head and part of his shirt. At first glance this bright area appears to be part of the background rather than part of the boy, making his head seem very tiny.

MichaelRyerson Mar 23, 2014 12:37 PM

You expect us to believe that isn't a leprechaun?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by ProphetM (Post 6507625)
Light is coming in from the side doorway, shining on the back half of the boy's head and part of his shirt. At first glance this bright area appears to be part of the background rather than part of the boy, making his head seem very tiny.

Once again, reason and logic ruins a perfectly good illusion.

MichaelRyerson Mar 23, 2014 12:44 PM

Posted this earlier, still a nice image
 
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7250/7...9426db3e_o.jpg
ivy station, los angeles, 1905

At the current location of the Culver City station of Los Angeles Metro's Exposition light rail line, this is a westbound view of "Ivy Station" in Culver City, California circa 1905. Located near the corner of Venice and Robertson Boulevards, the station was later renamed Culver Junction with the addition of a line down Venice Blvd in the late 1900's and eventually closed in 1953.

image via Metro Transportation Library and Archive

GaylordWilshire Mar 23, 2014 1:19 PM

https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-D...2520AM.bmp.jpghttp://i.imgur.com/Rn2awU2.jpg?1?6822
Elegance, functional: <This, maybe (South Central L.A., 1967)...but the "Lipstick Edition">?

See The Truth About Cars


Quote:

Originally Posted by Retired_in_Texas:
And yes Gaylord less functional automobiles. More reliable perhaps, but none the less with less functionality. Anytime an average size person cannot sit in the back seat of a so called luxury car without their knees bumping the front seats and one's head bumps the roof, it is less functional.
Quote:

Originally Posted by ProphetM (Post 6507625)
While true, passenger space is not the only measure of functionality. Modern cars are much more functional in many other ways. That a car works for much longer, with less downtime for repairs, is perhaps the very definition of more functional.

Quote:

Possibly, but one thing is for sure no one wants me hitting their 2014 anything sedan with one of my 6,000 pound '76 Lincoln Mark IVs moving at 70-75 mph. I'll survive, they won't!
Quote:

Originally Posted by ProphetM (Post 6507625)
That's quite doubtful. Your car would be in better shape than theirs, but you would not. In any crash the energy of movement must be dissipated. In a newer, more crushable car, that energy is purposely directed into deforming the body of the car outside the passenger compartment, with airbags taking over as the remaining energy reaches the passengers. In an older, more rigid car, the energy is dissipated more directly into you, as your body is deformed by the seatbelts and/or smashed against the interior of the car. Modern car design is very bad for cars, but much, much better for the people riding in them.

The Prophet knows... It sounds like Retired actually has more than one '76 Lincoln, each offering 6,000 lbs of functionality. That he can only drive one at a time, and since there are thankfully very few on the road, makes modern cars even safer.


Quote:

Originally Posted by Retired_in_Texas (Post 6507421)
Hmm, examples that could have come from the Sears catalog between 1908 and 1940. Elegance Fail!

http://www.searsarchives.com/homes/1933-1940.htm

Between 1908 and 1940 Sears sold some 70,000 homes in kit form.

And yes Gaylord less functional automobiles. More reliable perhaps, but none the less with less functionality. Anytime an average size person cannot sit in the back seat of a so called luxury car without their knees bumping the front seats and one's head bumps the roof, it is less functional. Passenger capacity is also a lessening of functionality. Just bought a 2014 Chrysler 300C with all the high tech junk available. Bought that instead of Lincoln or Cadillac because they were worse in overall passenger comfort. I don't buy imports of any nature because I don't want the associated maintenance hassles from crummy parts support for dealers. Safer? Possibly, but one thing is for sure no one wants me hitting their 2014 anything sedan with one of my 6,000 pound '76 Lincoln Mark IVs moving at 70-75 mph. I'll survive, they won't!


Quote:

Originally Posted by Retired_in_Texas (Post 6507042)
There is no elegance and little imagination expressed in the cookie cutter houses we see everywhere.... Isn't it exciting that one can look at a new home in Orange County and then buy the same or nearly identical home in Atlanta or the suburbs of Miami

As I said, one man's elegance is another man's tacky. The post of nationwide Craftsmans was obviously in reference to geography, not elegance. But compared to 1976 Lincoln Continental Mark IVs, those humble houses, sold by Sears or not, are unquestionably elegant. And I believe it's widely accepted that, campy as they are, mid-'70s Lincolns, with their very functional opera windows, absurd bulk, carburetor vs injection, 11MPG, and hideous designer editions--who can forget the hooker's dream, the "Lipstick Edition"?--were among the cars that drove Americans into German-car showrooms for functionality, quality, and...elegance.

CityBoyDoug Mar 23, 2014 2:13 PM

Lunch in the car....
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Those Who Squirm (Post 6507444)
Anyhow, when the conversation turned to dine-in-your-car restaurants, wasn't the allusion to the places that used to exist where a waitress (usually on skates) would bring you a tray which was fastened to your car door? She'd take your order and bring it to you as well, so it was full service, IIRC. (I'm a little too young to have seen these places except in old movies.) As for the roller skates, it almost sounds like a cliched stereotype, but if you stop to think about it I'm not sure how else those waitresses could have done their jobs.

Still, even then I wouldn't have wanted to eat in the car, if my interior was white leather.

Those Who Squirm

When I was 4 or 5 years old we would occasionally eat in these Los Angeles Drive-In restaurants. It was very novel and fun in those days. There was always a lot of adjusting and fiddling with the tray attachments. The man in the photo seems to be helping the carhop girl. The interior of the car would be filled with the aroma of hamburgers and fries. Although we were cautioned to be careful, we always ended up with some salt and a scrap of lettuce in the seat. The first carhops appeared in 1921.


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v4...se4c06d07.jpegLAPL

HossC Mar 23, 2014 3:38 PM

GW recently posted this picture of the Zamboanga at 3838 West Slauson.

Quote:

Originally Posted by GaylordWilshire (Post 6493331)

While I was looking through the photoset at USC, I found that one of the other pictures gives a better view of the Associated gas station in the background.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...1.jpg~original
Detail of picture at USC Digital Library

I was slightly surprised to find that the building (minus the winged "A") is still standing. The building with the large KERN'S advert on the side is also still there.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...2.jpg~original
GSV

MichaelRyerson Mar 23, 2014 3:53 PM

I really must follow the thread more closely.

GaylordWilshire Mar 23, 2014 5:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GaylordWilshire (Post 6493331)

http://i.imgur.com/0ppjDjG.jpg?1
GSV


When I posted the pics of the Zamboanga, I'm pretty sure I checked GSV--and found the pink "drop" indicating the parking lot next door. Looking again, I see that it may still stand--with an addition to the west.

A closeup:

http://i.imgur.com/SGLLwvd.jpg?1
jalopyjournal.com


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