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Earl Boebert Feb 23, 2014 9:44 PM

Not in the same league as "It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World," but with some nostalgic shots of the old TWA terminal in LAX, "Airplane" is now streaming on Netflix. Juvenile, raunchy, and not to be watched sober. I suppose somebody will have to explain to the young 'uns why us oldsters still crack up at the sequence of Robert Stack laying waste to the religious panhandlers in the lobby. And stop calling me Shirley.

Cheers,

Earl

Martin Pal Feb 23, 2014 11:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Retired_in_Texas (Post 6464822)
Thanks for the great photos of the Battleship Texas.

Speaking of Battleships, the Battleship U.S.S. IOWA has a new home in Los Angeles.

San Pedro’s newest icon is “The Big Stick”—an 887-foot battleship, the USS Iowa (BB-61)—now docked at its
new home, Berth 87, in the Main Channel off Harbor Blvd., at "L.A. Waterfront". The Iowa will be a permanent
living museum in San Pedro—the original home of the U.S Pacific Battle Fleet.

http://www.pacificbattleship.com/Ass...all_Ship/3.jpgPort of Los Angeles
http://www.pacificbattleship.com/

Wig-Wag Feb 24, 2014 12:44 AM

San Pedro Ferry Building
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by ProphetM (Post 6463626)
The ferry building had the good fortune of becoming the LA Maritime Museum. And right outside is the only place (so far as I'm aware) that you can ride a red car on an actual former PE line:

https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-P...0/PICT0118.JPG[IMG][/IMG]
Photo by me, 2007

They have 2 replica cars for daily service, and one genuine restored PE car (pictured above) used mostly on special occasions, on a short line which uses part of the former PE line as clearly illustrated by the older pic!

ProphetM; the Pacific Electric car shown in your photo has an interesting history. It is a replica of a PE 1000 class or “Ten Hundreds” as they were known, it was built from the damaged remains of PE 950 Class car 963 by Richard Fellows at the San Pedro boat building firm of Fellows & Stewart between 1960 and 1963 It can be seen on the extreme left of my photo taken at Fellows & Stewart in 1962. A 950 Class car can be seen immediately to it’s right. Note the more rounded shape of the front on the 950 class as opposed to the flat with rounded corners of the 1058.

The PE “Tens” were the largest wooden cars on the system. They were retired from service in 1950 with the abandonment of the Venice Short Line. Numbered from 1000 through 1044, only two survived, the 1000 and the 1001. Both are at the Orange Empire Railway Museum in Perris, CA. I am not sure why Richard Fellows chose the number 1058, but it does reflect the current day practice of numbering restored railway equipment created from sources other than their original owner at least one digit higher then the last number in the type or class.

Following restoration of the carbody, the 1058 operated on rubber tires until the passing of Mr. Fellows and it’s return to rail operation at San Pedro in 2003. My color photo dates from the opening of the Metro Blue line on July 14, 1990 and the return of rail transit to Los Angeles.

Two PE “Tens” can be seen in the LAPL photo of the Municipal Ferry Building in Gaylord Wilshire’s original post.

The other wooden PE trolley currently used on the The Port of Los Angeles Waterfront Red Line is an outstanding modern reconstruction of a PE 500 class car.

On another note, I concede that GW’s suggestion that the unidentified car in the foreground of the color photo taken on the ferry might very well be a Chrysler product rather than a Studebaker.

Photo by me http://i1315.photobucket.com/albums/...psb67dd5c3.jpg

Photo by me http://i1315.photobucket.com/albums/...psba340453.jpg

HossC Feb 24, 2014 1:03 AM

This is a 1924 picture of the Pacific-Southwest Bank at West Pico and South Mariposa.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...oMariposa1.jpg
USC Digital Library

It comes with a nice interior shot. The open window near the back indicates that this is all there was. I thought there might be a back office or vault, but the building behind is an auto repair shop.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...oMariposa2.jpg
USC Digital Library

Here's what you'll find there today. The size and shape of the store, coupled with the square side window near the rear, make me think that this is the original bank building.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...oMariposa3.jpg
GSV

HossC Feb 24, 2014 1:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MichaelRyerson (Post 6460902)

I give you the only known (to me) shot of the front elevation of the California Chapter of the Society of the Sons of the Revolution (trumpets sounding)...

https://v4s.yimg.com/so/7455/1266153...9d118c79_b.jpg
Sons of the Revolution, 437 South Hope Street, 1929

I'll concede that the image below isn't nearly as good as the one above, but it does show the Sons of the Revolution building surrounded by its neighbors.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...evolution1.jpg

Here's the full picture, which dates the photo at 8-18-33.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...2.jpg~original
Huntington Digital Library

GaylordWilshire Feb 24, 2014 1:28 AM

https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-b...2520PM.bmp.jpg

1963: The Islander in its last days, outbound from the San Pedro ferry building. The Vincent Thomas Bridge is under construction in the
background. Below, inbound, with the bridge nearing completion.

https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-B...2520PM.bmp.jpg


Los Angeles Maritime Museum


W-W: You are very gracious re the Stude/Chrysler debate. Hope you know it's all in fun...

Godzilla Feb 24, 2014 1:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Retired_in_Texas (Post 6464822)

I suspect those were taken before she headed of to support the landings at both Iwo Jima and Okinawa considering when she returned she had been painted in camouflage to make her less visible to Japanese aircraft.

The USS Texas was the last of the Dreadnaught class of Battleships in the Navy and had the unique distinction of having served in both WWI and WWII in both the European and Pacific theaters. Having in the early 1930s been the "Flagship Vessel" of the Navy she enjoyed many firsts as the Navy geared up to more modern times.

The Texas was decommissioned in April of 1948 after 34 years of service. She is now located in San Jacinto State Park in the Houston metro area. I had the privilege of touring her pretty much as she was on decommissioning. Anyone who is interested in her unique history can go to http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/state-pa...ttleship-texas and http://www.usstexasbb35.com/

For those who venture to the second link the spire seen in the background is the San Jacinto Monument, erected 1936 as tribute the location where Texas won its independence from Mexico in 1836. Our next door neighbor was the mason that constructed the 34 foot high Star atop the 570 foot tall Obelisk. It is the tallest stone memorial monument in the world and is 15 feet taller than the Washington Monument.

https://encrypted-tbn2.gstatic.com/i...jY8I4uZEIeI4zw
http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/state-pa...-site-monument


The source indicates the images are from "Navy Day," October 27, 1945. This would have been after both Iwo and Okinawa, which occurred in early-mid '45. Wiki seems to bear this out. Impressive service history. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Texas_%28BB-35%29

http://jpg1.lapl.org/00088/00088293.jpghttp://jpg1.lapl.org/00088/00088293.jpg


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...exas_BB-35.jpghttp://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...exas_BB-35.jpg

Godzilla Feb 24, 2014 1:45 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BifRayRock (Post 5897743)



Resisted posting these in attempt to avoid reposts. Search does not provide an immediate answer. :shrug:



Strange street markings, that were probably short lived. Effectiveness of middle of the road traffic warnings (potential cross traffic) seems questionable. :no: Arrow points to . . . ? [Bang*]

1929 Wilshire and Ardmore.
http://jpg1.lapl.org/pics19/00009340.jpghttp://jpg1.lapl.org/pics19/00009340.jpg


1940
http://jpg3.lapl.org/pics51/00075430.jpghttp://jpg3.lapl.org/pics51/00075430.jpg



1966
http://jpg1.lapl.org/00104/00104488.jpghttp://jpg1.lapl.org/00104/00104488.jpg







1970 - Wilshire Corridor
http://jpg3.lapl.org/pics37/00068485.jpghttp://jpg3.lapl.org/pics37/00068485.jpg




Opposing view - late '40s early '50s (?)
http://jpg1.lapl.org/pics19/00009318.jpghttp://jpg1.lapl.org/pics19/00009318.jpg








*1986 - Bang epilogue
http://catalog.library.ca.gov/exlibr...2RRHCCLTRN.jpghttp://catalog.library.ca.gov/exlibr...2RRHCCLTRN.jpg

Matthew Feb 24, 2014 4:05 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Retired_in_Texas (Post 6464772)
I'm also thinking that some of the "fixtures" that appear to be without light bulbs may actually be sprinkler heads.

I'm guessing they are for light bulbs. Early light bulbs weren't very bright, so architects of homes and buildings around that time (1903/04) would often cover the ceiling with light sockets, as what is seen in the photograph. When the 1929 photograph was taken, new gases and filaments resulted in much brighter bulbs, reducing the need to have so many of them.

Godzilla Feb 24, 2014 5:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 3940dxer (Post 5623701)
All I have is this old shot of Fletcher and San Fernando Road (looking west) from 1936. Not really what you had in mind, but maybe it will be of interest.


http://wwww.dkse.net/david/1936sanfernandordfletch.jpg
http://www.lapl.org/


And if crossing the intersection at Fletcher and San Fernando Rd. weren't challenging enough, another traffic challenge could be found at Fletcher and Verdugo Rd.

August '59 (Does three greens trump two reds?)
http://jpg1.lapl.org/pics50/00044617.jpghttp://jpg1.lapl.org/pics50/00044617.jpg


Those with 6volt thinking systems may earn a windshield decal.


1947
http://jpg1.lapl.org/pics50/00044607.jpghttp://jpg1.lapl.org/pics50/00044607.jpg


Wear it with pride! (Officer inspects traffic-stopping mohair?)
http://jpg1.lapl.org/pics43/00041057.jpghttp://jpg1.lapl.org/pics43/00041057.jpg

Beaudry Feb 24, 2014 7:00 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HossC (Post 6465114)
I'll concede that the image below isn't nearly as good as the one above, but it does show the Sons of the Revolution building surrounded by its neighbors.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...evolution1.jpg

Great catch! Another passing reference to the SotR, March 1956 --
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7405/1...7d953b12_o.png
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7411/1...d779cb1288.jpg

And what's really stupendous is great catch and ID, gentlemen, on the "last known photo" of the Sons bldg --

http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2889/1...d55bdf49_o.png

-- the LAFD identifies the aerial as December 1968, and as the society didn't finish moving their library out until November, it makes sense they'd be the lone holdout in that part of the world. It and the SKO (demo'd 12/69) house were remarkable in this regard...and the absence of the SotR in the Huntington shot means it dates to between December 68 and the first week of March of 69 (when they took the third floor off the Castle).

GaylordWilshire Feb 24, 2014 12:39 PM

More Monte Mar Vista


https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-o...2520AM.bmp.jpgUSCDL

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-C...2520AM.bmp.jpgGSV

10311 Glenbarr Avenue



Quote:

Originally Posted by Flyingwedge (Post 6263888)
That's it on the left in 1928, the large house on the corner. We're looking basically east:
http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...ps75600e28.jpg
USC Digital Library -- http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/co...d/9522/rec/190

BTW, all the b/w USC images posted here are zoomable. You can get in WAY close.

Street view, 1928:
http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...psa2f5dc69.jpg
USC Digital Library -- http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/co...d/9522/rec/190

1928 closeup of front door area from different photo than above; note detail of low brick wall:
http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...ps9e088db0.jpg
USC Digital Library -- http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/co...d/9522/rec/190

Probably looking out from the back of the same house, 1927 (note detail of low brick wall). I think this patio is on the east side of the house, perhaps in the back corner:
http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...ps6cdacbca.jpg
USC Digital Library -- http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/co.../74048/rec/113

"A" marks 2720 Monte Mar Terrace. The patio in the photo above looks out over where Beverwil Drive is today. The little ravine behind the oil derrick must be where the street is now that leads up to Circle Park:
http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...ps753302e7.jpg
Google Map with Terrain View

And the house in Jan 2011:
http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...ps4fdb7a86.jpg
GSV

I'm not sure if this 1927 photo was taken from inside 2720 Monte Mar Terrace (the windows don't match those in the front), but it looks at the oil facilities from almost the same angle as the patio photo:
http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...psce3c75cf.jpg
USC Digital Library -- http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/co...d/5640/rec/111

2720 Monte Mar Terrace was apparently owned for a time by actress Agnes Moorehead: http://aggiespicturepalace.blogspot....ouse-home.html


While I have great respect for Mr. Masters, sometimes I can't help but wonder how often he (as well as other trolling the same waters) gets his inspiration from Noirish Los Angeles....

https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-e...2520AM.bmp.jpg

Full story here.


More on Monte Mar Vista, Fred Forrester, and the Agnes Moorehead angle here: http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...ostcount=16615

Wig-Wag Feb 24, 2014 3:58 PM

Stude/Chrysler Debate
 
W-W: You are very gracious re the Stude/Chrysler debate. Hope you know it's all in fun...[/QUOTE]

No problem GW. GIven thecdramatic differences in the two cars it is amazing that a camera angle could actually cause confusion!

Cheers,
Jack

transitfan Feb 24, 2014 4:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Wig-Wag (Post 6465080)
ProphetM; the Pacific Electric car shown in your photo has an interesting history. It is a replica of a PE 1000 class or “Ten Hundreds” as they were known, it was built from the damaged remains of PE 950 Class car 963 by Richard Fellows at the San Pedro boat building firm of Fellows & Stewart between 1960 and 1963 It can be seen on the extreme left of my photo taken at Fellows & Stewart in 1962. A 950 Class car can be seen immediately to it’s right. Note the more rounded shape of the front on the 950 class as opposed to the flat with rounded corners of the 1058.

The PE “Tens” were the largest wooden cars on the system. They were retired from service in 1950 with the abandonment of the Venice Short Line. Numbered from 1000 through 1044, only two survived, the 1000 and the 1001. Both are at the Orange Empire Railway Museum in Perris, CA. I am not sure why Richard Fellows chose the number 1058, but it does reflect the current day practice of numbering restored railway equipment created from sources other than their original owner at least one digit higher then the last number in the type or class.

Following restoration of the carbody, the 1058 operated on rubber tires until the passing of Mr. Fellows and it’s return to rail operation at San Pedro in 2003. My color photo dates from the opening of the Metro Blue line on July 14, 1990 and the return of rail transit to Los Angeles.

Two PE “Tens” can be seen in the LAPL photo of the Municipal Ferry Building in Gaylord Wilshire’s original post.

The other wooden PE trolley currently used on the The Port of Los Angeles Waterfront Red Line is an outstanding modern reconstruction of a PE 500 class car.

On another note, I concede that GW’s suggestion that the unidentified car in the foreground of the color photo taken on the ferry might very well be a Chrysler product rather than a Studebaker.

Photo by me http://i1315.photobucket.com/albums/...psb67dd5c3.jpg

Photo by me http://i1315.photobucket.com/albums/...psba340453.jpg

Nice pics. I think I remember seeing PE 1058 at Del Amo station on opening weekend, but I did not take a pic. I rode on opening day 7/14/90, then came by the transit fair at Del Amo station the next day. Man, was it hot that weekend! 1990 in general was a hot year in Southern California :hell:

ethereal_reality Feb 24, 2014 4:13 PM

:previous: What's going on with the four palm trees in Wig-Wag's photograph?
Is that normal?

Hollywood Graham Feb 24, 2014 5:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 6465657)
:previous: What's going on with the four palm trees in Wig-Wag's photograph?
Is that normal?

Those palms were recently transplanted. The older leaves are tied up around the newer leaves to protect them.

MichaelRyerson Feb 24, 2014 6:20 PM

Great get, HossC. Thank you.
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by HossC (Post 6465114)
I'll concede that the image below isn't nearly as good as the one above, but it does show the Sons of the Revolution building surrounded by its neighbors.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...evolution1.jpg

Here's the full picture, which dates the photo at 8-18-33.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...2.jpg~original
Huntington Digital Library

What a nice find, Hoss, thanks very much. Also notice the Rubaiyat has gone through its 1930 remodel and now sports its new moniker the Wickland Apartments. And just there, beyond the Rubaiyat/Wickland, you can just see a slice of the Barbara Worth Apartments (originally the Briggs) at 407 Hope St. The Winning of Barbara Worth was a wildly popular novel (1911) by Harold Bell Wright and was subsequently made into a movie of the same name in 1926 (with Gary Cooper in an early featured role). It is generally the story of the struggles to bring the Imperial Valley into agricultural production with water from the Colorado river. The novel sold over a million copies and its popularity fueled the fad of naming many places and products after the fictitious Barbara Worth. Now remember this guy?...

http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7416/1...26645eb4_b.jpg
Nathan Stowell, ca.1920

He, of course, was the guy who generously donated the property upon which the Sons of the Revolution library was built. Interesting, when you consider how many times he must have visited that beautiful little building, perhaps even parking his automobile in front of the Barbara Worth Apartments. In his earlier life, a great part of his fortune was made in the Imperial Valley forming a company (about 1902) which then harnessed the Colorado River and delivered water to the valley through a vast irrigation system. He and his story were well known in the region. There is some evidence that Wright, who lived in El Centro at the time, based a major character and a major subplot on Nathan Stowell and his life story in the Winning of Barbara Worth.

Flyingwedge Feb 24, 2014 8:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HossC (Post 6465114)
I'll concede that the image below isn't nearly as good as the one above, but it does show the Sons of the Revolution building surrounded by its neighbors.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...evolution1.jpg

Here's the full picture, which dates the photo at 8-18-33.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...2.jpg~original
Huntington Digital Library

FWIW, you can see the future site of the SotR building in the background of this 1924 photo of Central Library construction:
http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...e.jpg~original
LAPL -- http://jpg1.lapl.org/00084/00084796.jpg

GaylordWilshire Feb 24, 2014 9:26 PM

https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-q...omplbigpic.jpg
LAT, Dec 7, 1913

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-E...startcompl.jpghttps://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-Z...2520PM.bmp.jpghttps://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-k...2520PM.bmp.jpg
LAT, Dec 7, 1913/Apr 26, 1924x2


I've looked in vain for photographs of Methodist Hospital at 2826 S Hope Street... anyone? After Methodist moved to Arcadia in the 50s, the building lasted until the mid-to-late-70s as part of the L.A. County health system. A post-70s building is on the site today, one with a similar setback. Needless to say, the "Grounds Like [a] Beautiful Natural Park" are given over to parking. The four-story nurses' dorm across Hope is also gone for a parking lot. In an aerial Googling, there seems to be no sign of the tunnel mentioned in the second article ...ok, ok, I know it's a tunnel, but I thought, was hoping, to find some vents or doors or some other tell-tale sign. Btw, Mayor Henry T. Hazard's house on the lot served as the first home of Methodist Hospital.

ethereal_reality Feb 24, 2014 11:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Martin Pal (Post 6460165)
Trying to put various things together...in one search I found a newspaper blurb saying that with recent innovations in movie technology a stripper in Los Angeles billed herself as "anamorphic, panoramic, stereophonic and George." Another newspaper blurb with nearly the same info wrote it as "anamorphic, panoramic, stereophonic and real George." If, as suggested, these are all movie technology terms, could "George" refer to George Eastman and Eastmancolor, which was a print stock developed in the mid-50's arond this same time? I have no corroboration on this.

SAM INCESSANT:
PLEASE WRITE!

http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/640...0/542/xw6g.jpg

-thx for your research Martin_Pal.

I didn't notice SAM INCESSANT: PLEASE WRITE! until you mentioned it in your post.
__


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