SkyscraperPage Forum

SkyscraperPage Forum (https://skyscraperpage.com/forum/index.php)
-   Found City Photos (https://skyscraperpage.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=23)
-   -   noirish Los Angeles (https://skyscraperpage.com/forum/showthread.php?t=170279)

Matthew Apr 23, 2013 3:11 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tovangar2 (Post 6099161)
There's also a shot of Pershing Square in Secret Agent looking SE. I cannot recall knowing about the structure shown:

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-v...034%2520AM.jpg

https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-m...108%2520AM.jpg
Monogram Pictures / Netflix

This is a structure called "The Victory House." It was a place to buy war/victory bonds for WWII.

http://jpg2.lapl.org/pics21/00045397.jpg
Source: www.lapl.org

ethereal_reality Apr 23, 2013 3:23 AM

:previous: Stunning night-time view of the 'The Victory House'. Thanks Matthew!
__

ethereal_reality Apr 23, 2013 4:17 AM

[QUOTE=tovangar2;6101401]
Your card E_R also shows the "Eastside" eagle well, out by the sidewalk. Rather like the LA Times eagle.


This eagle T2? (there are also two fountains out by the sidewalk)

http://imageshack.us/a/img211/3572/aabbreweryfu.jpg

At first I thought you were saying this eagle ended up in Hollywood Memorial Park.

ethereal_reality Apr 23, 2013 4:50 AM

Lookout Mountain Park, 1895

http://imageshack.us/a/img42/5436/aa...nillus1909.jpg
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/

http://imageshack.us/a/img805/4745/aaadlookout1.jpg
http://imageshack.us/a/img824/2300/aaadlookout1a.jpg
http://imageshack.us/a/img24/8445/aaadlookout1b.jpg




below: WUULF'S PEAK? A proposed scenic railway? -all new to me. (also notice Wonderland Point)

http://imageshack.us/a/img40/8913/aaadlookoutdetail.jpg
http://imageshack.us/a/img198/7383/a...nad1909cop.jpg
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/
__

tovangar2 Apr 23, 2013 5:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Matthew (Post 6101522)
This is a structure called "The Victory House." It was a place to buy war/victory bonds for WWII.

Thank you Matthew. Much appreciated.

tovangar2 Apr 23, 2013 5:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 6101596)
This eagle T2? (there are also two fountains out by the sidewalk)

Yes. I suppose all this stuff ends up in the salvage yards. The Los Angeles Brewery building itself was so severely Streamlined after Zobelein's death, I find it unrecognizable.

Nice Laurel Canyon brochure. I enjoyed that. Thx.

MichaelRyerson Apr 23, 2013 8:06 PM

http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8405/8...fe815d63_b.jpg
Cafe Grotesque, 625 1/2 S. Olive Street, Los Angeles, 1922

I somehow feel sure that Betty Katz, Margrethe Mather, Roy Rosen, Weston and the rest of the arts and progressive crowd visited this place. Café Grotesque? Ha, I love it! Wish I could find a pic, even something from down the street.

Los Angeles Guide and Apartment House Directory, 1922

rbpjr Apr 23, 2013 8:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CityBoyDoug (Post 6101372)
I went to one of these shows at Pan Pacific in 1958. I was totally awestruck by the prototype Dream Cars from General Motors. I also loved the working cut-away engines and transmissions on display.

Wow, what a car...amazing but funky...one question...where's the door handle(s)?

MichaelRyerson Apr 23, 2013 8:15 PM

A Sunset Boulevard survivor
 
http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8264/8...7ed2634d_b.jpg
Hotel Iris, 5849 West Sunset Boulevard, Los Angeles, 1926

USC digital archive/Dick Whittington Photography Collection, 1924-1987


http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8388/8...b29196dd_o.jpg
5849 Sunset Boulevard, 2013

Google Street View


http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8381/8...a0fcbc38_o.jpg
5849 Sunset Boulevard, 2013 (2)

Google Street View

MichaelRyerson Apr 23, 2013 8:36 PM

Santa Monica Boulevard two-fer
 
http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8116/8...ab60dd7d_o.png
5620 Santa Monica Boulevard, Los Angeles, 1926

USC digital archive/Dick Whittington Photography Collection, 1924-1987


Almost 90 years later...


http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8379/8...530cb917_o.jpg
5620 Santa Monica Boulevard, 2013

Google Street View

http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8524/8...490beda8_o.jpg
5620 Santa Monica Boulevard, 2013 (2)

Google Street View

http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8536/8...8465f17a_o.jpg
5620 Santa Monica Boulevard, 2013 (3)

You can make out the ghosts of windows past...

Google Street View

http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8124/8...3b6e7a27_o.jpg
5620 Santa Monica Boulevard, 2013 (4)

Can't quite make it out, either the 'Green Building' or the 'Greer Building'.

Google Street View

As for a noir connection, right next door to the west is the Harvey Apartments which we've talked about here before... nice neighborhood (used to be my stomping grounds. really.)

tovangar2 Apr 23, 2013 9:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MichaelRyerson (Post 6102268)

That's where Frances Gumm and her family stayed on vacation in 1926. It was later called the Hotel St Moritz. The club on the west side of the entrance was "The Ski Room". It had crossed 3-D skis as part of the signage. I recall one ski fell off (I guess this was in the late 70s) and was never replaced....

tovangar2 Apr 23, 2013 9:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by fhammon (Post 5436391)
...The building was originally made of adobe....Your photo clearly shows terracotta bricks....

I always wondered about this. Lugo House seems to be made of adobe in the "oldest close-up view of Los Angeles" pic (1858), but the 1937 survey (see quoted post) details that it was made only of brick, wood and cast iron (although they stick with the 1835-40 building date) This was confirmed during the 1951 demolition:
https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-q...04945%2BAM.jpg
water and power

In a very few years Lugo House had assumed its familiar shape.
I'm assuming that Lugo House was rebuilt not that long after its original build date (unless it was always brick. The 1858 reservoir is):


I was trying to pin down when LA changed over from adobe to brick and where the bricks came from. I found two references in Bixby Smith's "Adobe Days". She recalled being told that when John Temple built his Rancho Los Cerritos house in 1844, he imported bricks from back east, shipping them around the Horn. The bricks were used for the house's foundations (the upper walls were of adobe), to line a well and for paths and garden walls.

Bixby Smith also notes that in 1859 Abel Stearns built the Arcadia Block on Los Angeles Street with "bricks from the first local kiln". John Temple built the Clocktower Courthouse that same year.

Does anyone know the name of this kiln, its start date or location? Was the Arcadia Block the first brick building in LA as is often claimed?

tovangar2 Apr 23, 2013 9:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MichaelRyerson (Post 6102262)
http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8405/8...fe815d63_b.jpg
Cafe Grotesque, 625 1/2 S. Olive Street, Los Angeles, 1922

I somehow feel sure that Betty Katz, Margrethe Mather, Roy Rosen, Weston and the rest of the arts and progressive crowd visited this place. Café Grotesque? Ha, I love it! Wish I could find a pic, even something from down the street.

Los Angeles Guide and Apartment House Directory, 1922

https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-y...10202%2BAM.jpg
http://www.flickr.com/photos/manitobamuseum/1897156692/

MichaelRyerson Apr 23, 2013 10:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tovangar2 (Post 6102349)
I always wondered about this. Lugo House seems to be made of adobe in the "oldest close-up view of Los Angeles" pic (1858), but the 1937 survey (see quoted post) details that it was made only of brick, wood and cast iron (although they stick with the 1835-40 building date) This was confirmed during the 1951 demolition:
https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-w...222%2520PM.jpg

In what I think is the next photo of Lugo House in 1865, it has assumed its familiar form. Plaza Church has also been at least partially rebuilt.
I'm assuming that Lugo House was demolished and rebuilt in the time between these the two photos (unless it was always brick. The reservoir is):
https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-0...747%2520PM.jpg

I was trying to pin down when LA changed over from adobe to brick and where the bricks came from. I found two references in Bixby Smith's "Adobe Days". She recalled being told that when John Temple built his Rancho Los Cerritos house in 1844, he imported bricks from back east, shipping them around the Horn. The bricks were used for the house's foundations (the upper walls were of adobe), to line a well and for paths and garden walls.

Bixby Smith also notes that in 1859 Abel Stearns built the Arcadia Block on Los Angeles Street with "bricks from the first local kiln". John Temple built the Clocktower Courthouse that same year.

Does anyone know the name of this kiln, its start date or location? Was the Arcadia Block the first brick building in LA as is often claimed?

https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-O...434%2520PM.jpg

All images: Water and Power Museum

No, Arcadia Block isn't likely the first although it may have acquired that title by default, the actual first being lost to history. Morrow Mayo noted a brick building or home had been started in 1850, he uses this as a starting place for another story altogether but I think these were local bricks. But the real changeover probably dates from the arrival of the three Simons brothers in 1880. Whitewashed Adobe has a lengthy thread concerning the Simons brothers specifically and brick versus adobe generally. I can't attribute this but in my memory (not always good) I seem to remember a Garcia kiln on the banks of the Los Angeles River and quite early, maybe 1850-60. I'll have to look around for it.

MichaelRyerson Apr 23, 2013 10:29 PM

Oh man, T2, thank you so much for this. I'm grabbing it for my photo-stream. Thanks.

Krell58 Apr 23, 2013 10:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by fhammon (Post 6101197)
Thank you very much tovangar2 for asking for me. This is something we've discussed over at Pueblo Plaza before and the subject of construction forms was explored but in relation to the Pico House's construction as the photo seems to be taken from an elevation that might be consistent with an upper floor that might have been completed by then.

At any rate I'm disappointed in Jack Feldman's answer because it doesn't address the similar objects shown on the map in the same location drawn several years later.
For some reason I can't post this photo but here's the link again to the plaza section of the map:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/95072967@N02/8663075373/

Thanks again for indulging me. That was kind of you and I really appreciate it.

Could they be drinking fountains? The short one for kids, the taller two for adults.
PS I'm currently watching Gangster Squad, it's good so far.

tovangar2 Apr 23, 2013 10:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MichaelRyerson (Post 6102428)
No, Arcadia Block isn't likely the first although it may have acquired that title by default, the actual first being lost to history. Morrow Mayo noted a brick building or home had been started in 1850, he uses this as a starting place for another story altogether but I think these were local bricks. But the real changeover probably dates from the arrival of the three Simons brothers in 1880. Whitewashed Adobe has a lengthy thread concerning the Simons brothers specifically and brick versus adobe generally. I can't attribute this but in my memory (not always good) I seem to remember a Garcia kiln on the banks of the Los angeles River and quite early, maybe 1850-60. I'll have to look around for it.

Got it: http://calbricks.netfirms.com/brick.hunter.html. Thanks.

"In 1852, Captain Jesse Divine Hunter located at the corner of Broadway and Second streets in Los Angeles, California, and fired the first clay-fired bricks in Los Angeles. These bricks were used in the first brick building erected in town at the corner of Main and Third streets...

...There is no description of Hunter's brickyard at Broadway and Second streets in Los Angeles. He probably used surficial material on the property to make bricks, which were fired in field kilns using wood as fuel. The bricks were smaller and thinner than standard size. Because they were underfired, they spalled and eroded easily. These bricks were used locally in the Los Angeles area, and probably all of the first brick structures in town came from Hunter's kilns. Aside from the first brick house at Main and Third streets in Los Angeles, it is likely that Hunter provided bricks for the first brick jail house and, in 1854, the first brick school house, which stood on the northwest corner of Second and Spring streets."

(the rest is at the link)

Not quite early enough for Lugo House, but the problem with spalling would have been a reason to paint the Lugo residence.

The Downey residence's original wing, on Main between 3rd and 4th may be the first brick building in LA


See also: http://calbricks.netfirms.com/brick.mullallybm.html Pioneer Brick, estb 1854 (Joseph Mullally, Daniel Porter and Samuel Ayers)

"In 1855, Mullally, Porter and Ayers built the first flour mill in town for Abel Stearns and Jonathan Scott, known as the Eagle Mills."

MichaelRyerson Apr 23, 2013 11:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Krell58 (Post 6102440)
Could they be drinking fountains? The short one for kids, the taller two for adults.
PS I'm currently watching Gangster Squad, it's good so far.

You must be still watching the opening credits. It's all downhill from here.

Matthew Apr 24, 2013 2:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rbpjr (Post 6102266)
Wow, what a car...amazing but funky...one question...where's the door handle(s)?

Sensitivity solenoids opened the door. This car has an interesting story.

http://www.machine-history.com/Golden%20Sahara%201955

It was originally a totaled 1953 Lincoln.

http://images12.fotki.com/v531/photo...Feb1955-vi.jpg
Source: www.jalopyjournal.com

Flyingwedge Apr 24, 2013 4:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 6099488)

La Fiesta c. 1894

Six serious-looking guys in leather jackets:
http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...ps930e81ff.jpg
LAPL - http://jpg3.lapl.org/pics45/00072036.jpg


All times are GMT. The time now is 9:03 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.