SkyscraperPage Forum

SkyscraperPage Forum (https://skyscraperpage.com/forum//index.php)
-   Found City Photos (https://skyscraperpage.com/forum//forumdisplay.php?f=23)
-   -   noirish Los Angeles (https://skyscraperpage.com/forum//showthread.php?t=170279)

ProphetM Jul 1, 2014 6:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gsjansen (Post 6638209)
i'm still on the side of the fence that says that the perimeter walls of the underground garage for the state building was a utilization of the existing below grade perimeter foundation walls of the 1911/1912 times building. There is no other explanation that I can think of for why the angled wall was kept in relation to the state building.

http://jpg2.lapl.org/pics17/00018375.jpg
LAPL

(of course, I could be wrong..........)

I agree. Maybe even floors and ceilings as well, given the differing height of the two floors. The previously posited guess that the 19' tall level was made so tall because of printing presses seems plausible to me.

gsjansen Jul 1, 2014 6:42 PM

for no other reason except that I simply love old photos of the farmers market with Gilmore field, and no grove!

http://jpg1.lapl.org/pics40/00039924.jpg

I cannot believe how long I have been away from the site. It is taking me forever to read through all the pages of fabulous information that I have missed.

I promise to get back up to speed in a week or so.

MartinTurnbull Jul 1, 2014 7:30 PM

Teepee? Ice cream cone?
 
I found this image in a digital version of "The New Movie Magazine" from 1929-1930. The article was called "See the Wonders of the Movie Colony with the Hollywood Boulevardier"

http://archive.org/stream/newmoviema.../n419/mode/2up

I feel like I should know what and where it is, but it's got me stumped. It looks like the word(s) on the sign out front starts with a C, but that's all I can make out.

Does anybody here recognize this? Has it appeared here before?

And in related news, if anybody hasn't already snagged the title, I'd like henceforth to be addressed as "The Hollywood Boulevadier."

http://www.martinturnbull.com/wp-con...cream-cone.png

HossC Jul 1, 2014 8:06 PM

:previous:

Thanks for the link to "The New Movie Magazine", Martin. I'll have to read it more thoroughly later on.

I'm pretty sure the sign says "Chapman's" with "The Big Cone" above.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...ansBigCone.jpg
archive.org

The company seems to have expanded quickly around the time of the photograph. Here are the City Directory entries from 1929 and 1932. I'm not sure where you'd find "The Big Cone".

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...ChapmansCD.jpg
LAPL

GaylordWilshire Jul 1, 2014 9:00 PM

:previous:

Re: Chapman's and Currie's

http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...postcount=3185

http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...postcount=9666


A little Chapman's history:

https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-8...2520PM.bmp.jpghttps://lh3.googleusercontent.com/--...2520PM.bmp.jpghttps://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-M...2520PM.bmp.jpg
LAT Jan 21, 1923/June 1, 1925/Aug 15, 1928


Anyone have any info on this question posed in March 2011?:

"I noticed in sopas's post below (http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...postcount=3182) that Currie's replaced Chapman's as ice-cream purveyor in the Coliseum Hotel. Chapman's seeming to be the older company based on available pictures, I wondered if Currie's absorbed Chapman's at some point, but I couldn't find any info about it online."

oldstuff Jul 1, 2014 9:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HossC (Post 6638334)
:previous:

Thanks for the link to "The New Movie Magazine", Martin. I'll have to read it more thoroughly later on.

I'm pretty sure the sign says "Chapman's" with "The Big Cone" above.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...ansBigCone.jpg
archive.org

The company seems to have expanded quickly around the time of the photograph. Here are the City Directory entries from 1929 and 1932. I'm not sure where you'd find "The Big Cone".

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...ChapmansCD.jpg
LAPL

There was one in Fullerton on Spadra Road. There is a picture on the Pacific Electric Railway Historical Society website which shows the cone building and says that it was taken on May 2, 1937. The site says that Spadra Road is now Harbor Blvd. A comment made on June 23, 2014 indicates that it was located at 900 Spadra Road and at that time, according to the woman who posted the comment, was called " Helen's Ice Cream" and "The Big Cone"

MichaelRyerson Jul 1, 2014 9:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gsjansen (Post 6638230)
for no other reason except that I simply love old photos of the farmers market with Gilmore field, and no grove!

http://jpg1.lapl.org/pics40/00039924.jpg

I cannot believe how long I have been away from the site. It is taking me forever to read through all the pages of fabulous information that I have missed.

I promise to get back up to speed in a week or so.

It is a nice image. And we're looking over the Pan Pacific Auditorium from the back. Nice to see you hereabouts.

GaylordWilshire Jul 1, 2014 9:47 PM

:previous:

http://i.imgur.com/Mkd1tpY.jpg?1?3506

From the Fullerton library:http://fullertonlibrary.org/

According to a Pinterest post with this picture, it was "Originally named the Big Cone, Fullerton, California, ca1938. Owner Helen Eldred lived in a trailer behind the ice-cream shop." Must be her in front.

HossC Jul 1, 2014 9:58 PM

In "The New Movie Magazine", the page before "The Big Cone" has another purveyor of "Fancy Ice Cream". The caption says that "Herb Howe calls them 'quips in architecture'". Again, there's no address given.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...cyIceCream.jpg
archive.org

At first I'd thought we'd seen this one before, but e_r's previous post (below) seems to show a similar, yet different structure. Could the "444" over the entrance be the address?

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 6089916)

mystery location

Gas station and ice cream stand, Los Angeles

http://imageshack.us/a/img829/8430/a...icecreamst.jpg
ebay

I can't quite make out the sign on top of the hill. (my guess would be Baldwin Hills, but I don't remember such a sign)


ProphetM Jul 1, 2014 10:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by oldstuff (Post 6638400)
There was one in Fullerton on Spadra Road. There is a picture on the Pacific Electric Railway Historical Society website which shows the cone building and says that it was taken on May 2, 1937. The site says that Spadra Road is now Harbor Blvd. A comment made on June 23, 2014 indicates that it was located at 900 Spadra Road and at that time, according to the woman who posted the comment, was called " Helen's Ice Cream" and "The Big Cone"

Yes, Spadra is now Harbor Blvd., and 900 N. Harbor Blvd. is at the corner of Glenwood Ave. and is now the property of a mortuary addressed 902. It is also maybe 100 feet or so south of Berkeley Ave., which is where the Pacific Electric tracks crossed Spadra Road on a bridge.

Is this the photo?

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-G...uth-050237.jpg
PacificElectric.org

I was looking for a good pic of the bridge when I came across the page with the photo, because the photo was taken from the bridge. :)

And here is the bridge, looking north:

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-H...0/MP-00265.jpg
Also PacificElectric.org

Since this view looks north, the ice cream cone would be behind camera to the right. The other side of the bridge said "Welcome to Fullerton". Given the dates of the Golden Jubilee advertisement on the bridge, it seems likely that both photos were taken on the same day.

Apologies for the short excursion to Orange County; I grew up in Fullerton until I was 16 and that bridge - long gone by the time I was around - always held a fascination for me. It was local, and yet utterly unreachable. It was gone and so were the red cars, but on top of that I also had no idea where it used to stand as the books that contained the photos of it were too vague to tell me.

MartinTurnbull Jul 1, 2014 11:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by oldstuff (Post 6638400)
There was one in Fullerton on Spadra Road. There is a picture on the Pacific Electric Railway Historical Society website which shows the cone building and says that it was taken on May 2, 1937. The site says that Spadra Road is now Harbor Blvd. A comment made on June 23, 2014 indicates that it was located at 900 Spadra Road and at that time, according to the woman who posted the comment, was called " Helen's Ice Cream" and "The Big Cone"

If you compare the one that I posted with this one in Fullerton, the one that I found (and the bigger version HossC found) looks a fair bit taller than the Fullerton location. Regardless of height, I'm sure they were a fixture in whichever neighborhood they were built.

HossC Jul 1, 2014 11:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ProphetM (Post 6638440)

I was looking for a good pic of the bridge when I came across the page with the photo, because the photo was taken from the bridge. :)

And here is the bridge, looking north:

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-H...0/MP-00265.jpg
Also PacificElectric.org

Apologies for the short excursion to Orange County; I grew up in Fullerton until I was 16 and that bridge - long gone by the time I was around - always held a fascination for me. It was local, and yet utterly unreachable. It was gone and so were the red cars, but on top of that I also had no idea where it used to stand as the books that contained the photos of it were too vague to tell me.

It's hardly surprising that the bridge's location eluded you, ProphetM. Here it is on a 1953 aerial view (the earliest on Historic Aerials). It looks like Helen's Ice Cream has already gone, and I think the PE tracks may have been taken up.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...Bridge1953.jpg
Historic Aerials

The next aerial view they have is 1972, and the area is hardly recognizable. Berkeley Avenue now roughly follows the old route of the PE line on the east of Harbor Blvd, but turns sharply north to the west.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...Bridge1972.jpg
Historic Aerials

The route of the old PE line to the west of Harbor now seems to be the Juanita Cooke Greenbelt Trail.

ethereal_reality Jul 2, 2014 1:38 AM

A rare look inside J.W. Robinson's Department Store at 600 W. 7th Street, 1930s.

Photo #1
http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/102...0/849/ulne.jpg
ebay




detail, photo #1
http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/102...0/822/dqzj.jpg






Photo #2
http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/102.../841/1qidt.jpg
ebay




detail, Photo #2
http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/102...0/840/8n97.jpg





Photo #3
http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/102...0/850/x1pr.jpg
ebay




detail, photo #3
http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/102...0/853/dx77.jpg





Photo #4
http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/102.../841/ldj10.jpg
ebay





detail, photo #4
http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/102...0/829/nu5a.jpg


Earlier post (from way back on page 42!) showing the exterior transformation, 1934.

http://skyscraperpage.com/forum/show...&postcount=912

I imagine the interiors were transformed at this time as well.
__

seller's description/
http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/640...0/829/3ooz.jpg

I found this photo set a few weeks ago. I was delighted, as you can imagine.
__

Here's how the building looks today.
http://www.you-are-here.com/downtown/robinson.html

I wonder what the interior look like today?

ethereal_reality Jul 2, 2014 2:28 AM

Have we visited this municipal auto camp on NLA?

Elysian Park, 1928
http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/102...0/853/wptw.jpg

ebay

http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/102...0/856/n85e.jpg

__

3940dxer Jul 2, 2014 2:51 AM

Historical Pomona
 
Last Sunday lorendoc and I visited some historic sites in the Pomona Valley. This region of Southern California became settled in the early 1800's, owing to its proximity to the Butterfield Stage route. (Following a similar route, the Southern Pacific Railroad was built through the area in the 1870's.) For travelers from points east, this was one of the last halts before Pueblo De Los Angeles.

Pomona had the world's fist high voltage transmission line (built to power a local water pump), and the first automated telephone switchboard west of the Mississippi. A few adobes and other old structures survive, some open to the public on a limited basis.

Our first stop was the Phillips Mansion at 2640 W. Pomona Blvd., ca. 1875. (The now-industrial area is the former site of Spadra, which preceded Pomona.) The builder, Louis Phillips, who by the 1890's was the wealthiest man in Los Angeles County. Per Wikipedia:

The Phillips Mansion was built in 1875 at a cost of over $20,000. It has been described as having been built in the "Second Empire" or "Classic Haunted Mansion architectural style." It was built with 3-foot-thick (0.91 m) walls, 16-foot (4.9 m) ceilings and six fireplaces. The bricks were made at the site by Joseph Mulally of Los Angeles. With its use of a mansard roof, some have described it as being "in the style of the New Orleans French homes." Another writer noted that it "looks as if it had been lifted bodily from the tree-lined street of a midwestern county seat," the "kind of house the banker of such a town would build for himself." The interior of the mansion is finished in cherry and maple wood that was hauled by horse and wagon from San Pedro. The mansion represented a number of firsts in the Pomona Valley, including the following:

The first home built with fired bricks.
The first home fitted with gas lighting.
The first example of mansard roof architecture.


http://wwww.dkse.net/david/Pomona/DSCN4974.JPG

http://wwww.dkse.net/david/Pomona/DSCN4975.JPG

The building is only open for special events, and surrounded by fencing -- we were unable to go inside. It was damaged by the Upland and Sierra Madre earthquakes but has seen extensive renovation work, and looks to be in quite good condition these days.

Another historic structure, the Currier House, is located behind the Phillips Mansion. A. T. Currier was elected Sheriff of Los Angeles County in 1881 and served as a state Senator for many years. He owned a ranch in the Pomona Valley and was one of the area's leading citizens. The Currier house was built in 1907 in City Of Industry, but was moved to the Pomona site in 2004. It is in poor condition and closed to the public. The Tobe Hooper horror film The Mortuary was shot here.

http://wwww.dkse.net/david/Pomona/DSCN4981.JPG

From a small hillside just south of the site I got a decent "zoom" shot of the structures.

http://wwww.dkse.net/david/Pomona/DSCN4986.JPG


Next we visited Adobe de Palomares, at 419 E. Arrow Highway, the 13 room home of Don Ygnacio Palomares and his wife Dona. The family owned Ranch San Jose, which included the cities of Pomona, La Verne, San Dimas, Diamond Bar, Azusa, Covina, Walnut, Glendora, and Claremont. Construction began in 1850 and features adobe type construction, combined with milled roofing and flooring.

Don Ygnacio died in 1864 and over the years the structure disintegrated into ruins. In 1934 the Pomona Historical Society acquired the property and restored it. Adobe de Palomares has been a museum, open to the public, since 1940. The structure in in very nice condition and evokes a strong feeling of rustic, early California. A rear out-building houses a restored blacksmith shop. The museum doesn't allow interior photos, but here are two shots of the outside.

http://wwww.dkse.net/david/Pomona/Palomares.c.jpg

http://thebillbeaverproject.com/2011...-de-palomares/


http://wwww.dkse.net/david/Pomona/DSCN4995.JPG

http://wwww.dkse.net/david/Pomona/DSCN5000.JPG

http://wwww.dkse.net/david/Pomona/DSCN5011b.jpg

Our final stop was Casa Primera at 1569 N. Park Avenue, less than a mile from Adobe de Palomares. This dwelling, which also belonged to Don Ygnacio, was built in 1837 and was the first home built in the area. It's in excellent condition, and also contains a small museum.

http://wwww.dkse.net/david/Pomona/DSCN5012.JPG


http://wwww.dkse.net/david/Pomona/DSCN5007.JPG

Inside the museum is an original copy of 1874 plat map showing the 15,000 acre Rancho San Jose that was deeded by Mexican Governor Juan Alvarado to Don Ygnacio Palomares and Don Ricardo Vejar. I believe that present-day Pomona would be roughly in the center.

http://wwww.dkse.net/david/Pomona/DSCN5008.JPG

These age, look, and general feeling of these small museums very much reminded me of the ones along Highway 395 in eastern California. I was struck that in the mid to late 1800's, Pomona was probably quite similar to desert towns like Independence, Lone Pine, and Big Pine. Of course, Pomona is now a major Los Angeles suburb crisscrossed by freeways and bears little resemblance to those rustic desert towns. Still, visiting these old adobes certainly takes one back in time, and it's a pleasant surprise to see such well preserved examples less than an hour from downtown.

There are two more sites in the area that we did not visit on this trip. La Casa Alvarado is another early adobe, built in 1840 and located at 1459 Old Settlers Lane in Pomona. There's also the Ebell Museum, at 585 E. Holt Ave. It seems to be a bit larger than the other two, but is only open Wednesday through Friday. We could only peek through the windows, but I hope to go in some time.

All photos mine, except where noted.

Krell58 Jul 2, 2014 3:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 3940dxer (Post 6638617)

http://wwww.dkse.net/david/Pomona/DSCN4975.JPG

All photos mine, except where noted.

Is that a cardboard ghost in the left attic window?

Lorendoc Jul 2, 2014 4:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Krell58 (Post 6638646)
Is that a cardboard ghost in the left attic window?

As good a photographer as 3940dxer is, he did not need to photoshop the ghost below the mansard roof. It was already there when we arrived. The docent at the Palomares adobe, Nick, mentioned that the Phillips mansion was occupied by a caretaker, and indeed we saw an electric light was on inside. Nick said the bottom floor of the mansion is open once a year to visitors, but that the original furnishings were long gone. It is owned by the Historical Society of Pomona Valley.

The Phillips mansion is a very unlikely deuxieme empire structure in the middle of nowhere, right beside the three tracks of the Union Pacific (formerly Southern Pacific) main line. The juxtaposition of the Currier house next door is odd.

Flyingwedge Jul 2, 2014 8:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gsjansen (Post 6638209)
i'm still on the side of the fence that says that the perimeter walls of the underground garage for the state building was a utilization of the existing below grade perimeter foundation walls of the 1911/1912 times building. There is no other explanation that I can think of for why the angled wall was kept in relation to the state building.

http://jpg2.lapl.org/pics17/00018375.jpg
LAPL

(of course, I could be wrong..........)

Here's the area on the 1921 Baist Map:
http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...b.jpg~original
Historic Mapworks -- http://www.historicmapworks.com/Map/US/19409/Plate+003/

1931:
http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...7.jpg~original
LAPL -- http://www.lapl.org/sites/default/fi...ps/map0002.jpg

As previously mentioned, it's easy to see how the garage mirrors the shape of the old Times Building, except for the long angle below the odd NE corner:
http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...d.jpg~original
Los Angeles Times, October 16, 1938

The death knell of the 1912 Times Building is described here:
http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...c.jpg~original
Los Angeles Times, August 18, 1937

BTW, looking at old Sanborn maps, it appears that 1st Street was widened from 68 to 110 feet, so perhaps some portion of the south wall of the 1912 Times Building basement still exists under the widened roadway. Broadway is 80 feet wide before 1910 and after 1950.

Contemporary news articles describe demolishing the old Times Building substructure and designing and constructing the new State Building garage; it doesn't sound like much of the old Times Building basements were used, other than the hole in the ground they made. But if the 1938 garage plan is to be believed, it would seem that at the very least the northeast corner 1912 Times Building basement walls were incorporated into the State Building garage structure; why tear out the walls in the NE corner and then rebuild them in that odd shape?:
http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...1.jpg~original
Los Angeles Times, November 9, 1939

http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...b.jpg~original
Los Angeles Times, June 19, 1939

If it was such a job to rip out the old Times Building basement at 1st and Broadway, why wasn't the State Building garage built at 1st and Spring instead?
http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...1.jpg~original
1st and Spring at lower left, 1932 @ USCDL -- http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/co.../33789/rec/158

ProphetM Jul 2, 2014 3:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Flyingwedge (Post 6638775)
Here's the area on the 1921 Baist Map:
http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...b.jpg~original
Historic Mapworks -- http://www.historicmapworks.com/Map/US/19409/Plate+003/

1931:
http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...7.jpg~original
LAPL -- http://www.lapl.org/sites/default/fi...ps/map0002.jpg

As previously mentioned, it's easy to see how the garage mirrors the shape of the old Times Building, except for the long angle below the odd NE corner:
http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...d.jpg~original
Los Angeles Times, October 16, 1938

The death knell of the 1912 Times Building is described here:
http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...c.jpg~original
Los Angeles Times, August 18, 1937

BTW, looking at old Sanborn maps, it appears that 1st Street was widened from 68 to 110 feet, so perhaps some portion of the south wall of the 1912 Times Building basement still exists under the widened roadway. Broadway is 80 feet wide before 1910 and after 1950.

Contemporary news articles describe demolishing the old Times Building substructure and designing and constructing the new State Building garage; it doesn't sound like much of the old Times Building basements were used, other than the hole in the ground they made. But if the 1938 garage plan is to be believed, it would seem that at the very least the northeast corner 1912 Times Building basement walls were incorporated into the State Building garage structure; why tear out the walls in the NE corner and then rebuild them in that odd shape?:
http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...1.jpg~original
Los Angeles Times, November 9, 1939

http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...b.jpg~original
Los Angeles Times, June 19, 1939

If it was such a job to rip out the old Times Building basement at 1st and Broadway, why wasn't the State Building garage built at 1st and Spring instead?

Answer: because they didn't really rip out the old basement. I have noticed in these type of articles, from roughly the 1930s-1950s especially, they tend to gloss over the old in favor of the new. They're very big on telling how much money is spent, how many hours worked, how wonderful the brand new thing is, and anything that might previously have been there is usually described as dilapidated, worn out, an eyesore, etc. Never fix when you can demolish and build something new and modern! They use "old" as a pejorative. It simply would not do to advertise that you're using something old in your shiny new construction. There is a clue in the article, however:

Quote:

The roof area, reconstructed with reinforced concrete and steel beams, ...
You don't re-construct a roof on a brand new structure.

There isn't a whole lot to a garage anyway - floor, walls, roof and supporting pillars at its most basic. They could have left the outer walls and that's half the construction. Maybe they left the floor/ceiling between the two levels, and maybe not. Would the sub-basement ceiling be able to bear the load of parked cars at the basement level? It was apparently already made to bear the load of heavy newspaper press equipment. But at the least, the article indicates that the whole thing got a new roof. They may or may not have redone the entire inside as well.

BifRayRock Jul 2, 2014 4:07 PM





1915 - Some "unknown" structure. Eerie.

http://hdl.huntington.org/utils/ajax...XT=&DMROTATE=0http://hdl.huntington.org/utils/ajax...XT=&DMROTATE=0http://hdl.huntington.org/utils/ajax...XT=&DMROTATE=0
http://hdl.huntington.org/utils/ajax...XT=&DMROTATE=0http://hdl.huntington.org/utils/ajax...XT=&DMROTATE=0http://hdl.huntington.org/utils/ajax...XT=&DMROTATE=0




http://hdl.huntington.org/cdm/single.../15038/rec/781



http://hdl.huntington.org/utils/ajax...XT=&DMROTATE=0http://hdl.huntington.org/utils/ajax...XT=&DMROTATE=0
http://hdl.huntington.org/utils/ajax...XT=&DMROTATE=0http://hdl.huntington.org/utils/ajax...XT=&DMROTATE=0




1919 - From the "Edison" building at Third and Broadway. http://hdl.huntington.org/cdm/single.../16458/rec/751

http://hdl.huntington.org/utils/ajax...XT=&DMROTATE=0


http://hdl.huntington.org/utils/ajax...XT=&DMROTATE=0http://hdl.huntington.org/utils/ajax...XT=&DMROTATE=0http://hdl.huntington.org/utils/ajax...XT=&DMROTATE=0
http://hdl.huntington.org/utils/ajax...XT=&DMROTATE=0http://hdl.huntington.org/utils/ajax...XT=&DMROTATE=0http://hdl.huntington.org/utils/ajax...XT=&DMROTATE=0










All times are GMT. The time now is 8:43 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.