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Albany NY Nov 19, 2011 1:59 AM

The more things change (here) the more they remain the same (there)
 
"Welcome to the thread Pompeyuk. I spent a summer in Portsmouth many years ago.
I stayed at the YMCA across from the bombed out Royal Garrison Church. My cohorts and I would go to a pub called 'Still & West'."


I know its off topic, but I had to let ethereal_reality and PompeyUK know I stayed at the Felton House (aka The Buckingham House) in Portsmouth in August. Supposed to be haunted, although the creepiest thing there was a guest from Belgium who smelled of old cheese and sauerkraut. Still & West is still there, as popular as ever. Had many (too many) enjoyable evenings there. There's no connection to Los Angeles, but more of an astonishing contrast. In LA the landscape seems to mostly change with every generation, while in most of the UK there is a quiet, dignified permanence to buildings that can be several hundred years old.

FredH Nov 19, 2011 2:54 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cleats (Post 5371180)
And my absolute pride and joy of almost 17 years, my 1958 Cadillac Coupe deVille purchased on 11/07/57 at Lou Ehlers Cadillac by Mrs. Lucille D. Arnaz of 1000 N. Roxbury Drive Beverly Hills, Calif. My girl (also named Lucy :) is always a hit at car shows:multibow)!!! Can you just imagine how beautiful that redhead looked driving this car???

~F3
http://img197.imageshack.us/img197/3108/58deville1.jpg

I LOVE LUCY

That is one fine looking ride Fab Fifties...if I saw you coming I would pull over and bow!
Here is a surprising find of Lucy's voters registration with commie affiliations!http://jpg1.lapl.org/pics44/00041994.jpg[/QUOTE]

Lucy Explains the 1936 Communist Registration:

(And doesn't Desi look thrilled!)

http://img402.imageshack.us/img402/1...allpresser.jpg
Los Angeles Times

Story and additional picture here:

http://framework.latimes.com/2011/09...ommunist-link/

3940dxer Nov 19, 2011 3:39 AM

(Continuing my post about Runyon Canyon on Page 263...)

Southward, down the hill, is narrow but mostly paved Runyon Canyon Road. This road once linked Mulholland to North Vista St. but is gated now -- walkers only.

Partway up the Canyon was a mansion called San Patrizio built in the 30's with tennis courts, a swimming pool, and various guest facilities. Supposedly, Hollywood stars rented the mansion. The few historical accounts are fuzzy, but I believe that the main house was demolished in the late 70's. The tennis court remains, along with a swimming pool filled with dirt. Here's a photo of the tennis court, with Hollywood and Sunset Blvds. in the background (me). The tennis court overlooks Fuller Avenue, which is 3 blocks west of La Brea. (Sorry for the fuzzy image - it was getting dark!)

http://wwww.dkse.net/david/100_8724.bw.mid.jpg

Stories of San Patrizio's creation and end differ, but according to Wikipedia, tenor John McCormack bought the property from Carman Runyon in 1930:

"McCormack toured frequently and in his absence the mansion was often rented out to such celebrities as Janet Gaynor and Charles Boyer. The McCormacks made many friends in Hollywood, among them Will Rogers, John Barrymore, Basil Rathbone, C. E. Toberman and the Dohenys. After his farewell tour of America in 1937, the McCormacks deeded the estate back to Carman Runyon, expecting to return at a later date. World War II intervened, however, and, McCormack's health was broken by a wartime concert tour. McCormack died in 1945. In the meantime, Huntington Hartford, heir to the A&P Grocery fortune and patron of the arts, purchased the property in 1942, moving into the mansion and renaming the estate "The Pines". He commissioned Frank Lloyd Wright and his son Lloyd Wright, who had offices in Hollywood, to draft ambitious plans for developing the estate. These included a "cottage hotel" lower canyon and a futuristic "play resort" country club on the ridge. When neighborhood opposition to the design put the project on hold, Hartford had Lloyd Wright design and build a pool pavilion on the crest of the hill at Inspiration Point, facing Hollywood.

Schemes were later proposed for galleries in the canyon, but after 1955, Hartford began to spend more time in New York where his Gallery of Modern Art was eventually built. In the mid '40s, Hartford wrote an adaptation of "Jane Eyre" called "Master of Thornfield," which ran for two weeks in Cincinnati and starred Errol Flynn as Mr. Rochester. This partnership led to Flynn staying in the pool-house briefly in 1957-58, and is the origin of a legend that "The Pines" was Flynn's estate.

In 1964, Hartford offered the property as a gift to the city, but this was turned down by Mayor Sam Yorty. As Lloyd Wright recalled in 1977, "Here was this very wealthy man and he wanted to give something very stunning to Hollywood. The Chambers of Commerce, the hotel owners and the various businesses were jealous of the park, and with the help of the City officials, the City refused to give us permits. Hunt was so angry that he wanted to get out immediately and sold the property at a low price to [Jules] Berman, who then destroyed the mansion and let the place run down." Jules Berman, who had made a fortune importing the well-known Mexican coffee-flavored liqueur Kahlúa, saw the estate potentially as a "Tiffany development, a beautiful subdivision of 157 luxury homes." After purchasing the canyon, he razed Son Patrizio and the guest houses to avoid paying taxes on the deteriorating structures. His "Huntington Hartford Estates" development, trading on the name of its famous former owner, encountered resistance led by Daniel deJonghe, a park activist. The project was stopped in 1978 before building could begin. The Lloyd Wright pool-house remained standing until 1972 when a fire in the canyon destroyed all but its natural stone foundations
."
(Wikipedia)

I can't find any original images of San Patrizio. Anybody?

Slightly southwest, nearer the bottom of the hill, is Wattles Mansion:

"In 1907, the Wattles family commissioned noted architects Myron Hunt and Elmer Grey, whose portfolio also included the Beverly Hills Hotel, Huntington Library, and Pasadena's Rose Bowl. The team of Hunt and Grey designed this Mission Revival residence with extensive grounds that featured a Japanese Garden, an Italian Rose Garden, a Formal Spanish Garden, Palm Court, and orchards, as well as boasting exotic plants from around the world. In the early days of this century, the Wattles Mansion and its gardens, along with the estate of painter Paul De Longpre and the Sturtevant family's giant lily pads, generated nationwide interest, and soon became Hollywood's first tourist attractions."
www.wattlesmansion.com

Looking northeast:
http://www.dkse.net/david/Wattles.residence.jpg
www.wattlesmansion.com

Looking southwest:
http://www.dkse.net/david/00070911a.jpg
LAPL

http://www.dkse.net/david/wattles.jpg
www.wattlesmansion.com

The Japanese Garden, most of which remains:
http://www.dkse.net/david/ecs0012a.jpg
LAPL

Wattles Mansion is maintained by the Hollywood Heritage organization. The grounds of are open to the public but the interior is only open for special events. I think Wattles may have been used for some scenes in Chinatown - anybody know?

Wattles Mansion today:
http://www.dkse.net/david/Wattles078.jpg
http://www.theokaynetwork.com/apps/m...433N-38L1D433R

3940dxer Nov 19, 2011 4:17 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GaylordWilshire (Post 5483247)
Sopas: Love the Smiling Irishman's lot, and love that fur-covered T-bird. And the model--I am continually amazed by the style of brassieres in the fifties--how men got women to display their goods so weirdly, and then designed car bumpers the same way, up and OUT, watch out, I'm comin' through!

And so the model reminded me of Dagmar, who bequeathed her name to the bumpers...

http://jpg1.lapl.org/00092/00092999.jpgLAPL
Per the LAPL: "Looking every inch a television star, Dagmar enjoys an evening at Ciro's with her husband, Dan Dayton
(left); Lorraine Cugat (second from right), estranged wife of Bandleader Xavier Cugat, and her escort, Gould Morrison.
Dagmar, who is big on TV in the east, flew out here to spend some time with her husband."

And, GaylordWilshire, your post reminded me of this classic shot, in which Sophia Loren gazes disapprovingly into Jayne Mansfields bra-less decolletage. 1957, Romanoff's Restaurant, Beverly Hills. Looks like the meal hadn't started yet - it must have been one slow dinner!

http://wwww.dkse.net/david/Cleavage.jpg
Public Domain

Miss Mansfield was killed in an auto accident near Biloxi, Mississippi in 1967. Her car crashed into the rear of a tractor-trailer that had slowed because of a truck that was spraying mosquito fogger.

sopas ej Nov 19, 2011 5:25 AM

I thought this might be of interest, from blogdowntown.com:

38 Years Ago: Broadway Department Store Moved Off Namesake Street

By ERIC RICHARDSON
Published: Wednesday, November 16, 2011, at 09:46AM


http://img97.imageshack.us/img97/6968/dw56282isla.jpg
USC Archive

DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES — On November 16, 1973, the doors to the Broadway Department Store were closed one final time at 4th and Broadway, the corner the then-massive store had inhabited since its founding in 1896.

The next day, the store opened its doors at 7th and Flower, inside the new mixed-use Broadway Plaza.

It was actually in August of 1895 that the "Broadway Department Store" opened its doors at 401 S. Broadway, but the store's first incarnation was forgettable. J.A. Williams and Co. opened the small store, advertising that "the people of Los Angeles have never seen goods sold at our prices." The store made it through the holiday season and then promptly went bankrupt.

On February 24, 1896, Arthur Letts took over operation of the failed enterprise, advertising a massive bankruptcy sale to move all of the store's previous wares within 30 days.

Letts had a magic touch, and by 1911 the store had grown to four floors and 125,000 square feet.

It wasn't enough, though, and in 1913 Letts leased three floors in the Clark Hotel on Hill Street as a temporary home during the construction of a new nine-story building with nearly 11 acres of floor space. The three-phased construction project wrapped in 1915.

Read the rest by clicking on this.

ethereal_reality Nov 19, 2011 5:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 3940dxer (Post 5485814)
(Continuing my post about Runyon Canyon on Page 263...)

Southward, down the hill, is narrow but mostly paved Runyon Canyon Road. This road once linked Mulholland to North Vista St. but is gated now -- walkers only.

Partway up the Canyon was a mansion called San Patrizio built in the 30's with tennis courts, a swimming pool, and various guest facilities. Supposedly, Hollywood stars rented the mansion. The few historical accounts are fuzzy, but I believe that the main house was demolished in the late 70's. The tennis court remains, along with a swimming pool filled with dirt. Here's a photo of the tennis court, with Hollywood and Sunset Blvds. in the background (me). The tennis court overlooks Fuller Avenue, which is 3 blocks west of La Brea. (Sorry for the fuzzy image - it was getting dark!)

http://wwww.dkse.net/david/100_8724.bw.mid.jpg

Stories of San Patrizio's creation and end differ, but according to Wikipedia, tenor John McCormack bought the property from Carman Runyon in 1930:

"McCormack toured frequently and in his absence the mansion was often rented out to such celebrities as Janet Gaynor and Charles Boyer. The McCormacks made many friends in Hollywood, among them Will Rogers, John Barrymore, Basil Rathbone, C. E. Toberman and the Dohenys. After his farewell tour of America in 1937, the McCormacks deeded the estate back to Carman Runyon, expecting to return at a later date. World War II intervened, however, and, McCormack's health was broken by a wartime concert tour. McCormack died in 1945. In the meantime, Huntington Hartford, heir to the A&P Grocery fortune and patron of the arts, purchased the property in 1942, moving into the mansion and renaming the estate "The Pines". He commissioned Frank Lloyd Wright and his son Lloyd Wright, who had offices in Hollywood, to draft ambitious plans for developing the estate. These included a "cottage hotel" lower canyon and a futuristic "play resort" country club on the ridge. When neighborhood opposition to the design put the project on hold, Hartford had Lloyd Wright design and build a pool pavilion on the crest of the hill at Inspiration Point, facing Hollywood.

Schemes were later proposed for galleries in the canyon, but after 1955, Hartford began to spend more time in New York where his Gallery of Modern Art was eventually built. In the mid '40s, Hartford wrote an adaptation of "Jane Eyre" called "Master of Thornfield," which ran for two weeks in Cincinnati and starred Errol Flynn as Mr. Rochester. This partnership led to Flynn staying in the pool-house briefly in 1957-58, and is the origin of a legend that "The Pines" was Flynn's estate.

In 1964, Hartford offered the property as a gift to the city, but this was turned down by Mayor Sam Yorty. As Lloyd Wright recalled in 1977, "Here was this very wealthy man and he wanted to give something very stunning to Hollywood. The Chambers of Commerce, the hotel owners and the various businesses were jealous of the park, and with the help of the City officials, the City refused to give us permits. Hunt was so angry that he wanted to get out immediately and sold the property at a low price to [Jules] Berman, who then destroyed the mansion and let the place run down." Jules Berman, who had made a fortune importing the well-known Mexican coffee-flavored liqueur Kahlúa, saw the estate potentially as a "Tiffany development, a beautiful subdivision of 157 luxury homes." After purchasing the canyon, he razed Son Patrizio and the guest houses to avoid paying taxes on the deteriorating structures. His "Huntington Hartford Estates" development, trading on the name of its famous former owner, encountered resistance led by Daniel deJonghe, a park activist. The project was stopped in 1978 before building could begin. The Lloyd Wright pool-house remained standing until 1972 when a fire in the canyon destroyed all but its natural stone foundations
."
(Wikipedia)

I can't find any original images of San Patrizio. Anybody?


3940dxer-
This is the ONLY photo I have of San Patrizio/The Pines. On the right through the trees there seems to be a enormous picture window.

http://img13.imageshack.us/img13/134...hnmccormic.jpg
LAPL

http://photos.lapl.org/carlweb/jsp/F...olNumber=54420

ethereal_reality Nov 19, 2011 5:58 AM

Artist's cottages nestled in a peaceful canyon March 25, 1965.


http://img339.imageshack.us/img339/2...tistcottag.jpg
LAPL

http://photos.lapl.org/carlweb/jsp/F...olNumber=39705



below: Huntington Hartford sitting in a wagon. This photo is dated March 25, 1965 (the same date as the photo above).
The descriptions of these two photos are quite vague. I'm guessing they were taken in Runyon Canyon.

http://img713.imageshack.us/img713/2...tistcottag.jpg
LAPL

http://photos.lapl.org/carlweb/jsp/F...olNumber=39704





http://img23.imageshack.us/img23/606...epinesoct9.jpg
LAPL

http://photos.lapl.org/carlweb/jsp/F...olNumber=54421

_____

GaylordWilshire Nov 19, 2011 1:37 PM

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-1...2520AM.bmp.jpgLAPL

GaylordWilshire Nov 19, 2011 2:27 PM

https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-E...2520AM.bmp.jpgLAPL

GaylordWilshire Nov 19, 2011 2:28 PM

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-X...2520AM.bmp.jpgLAPL

GaylordWilshire Nov 19, 2011 2:57 PM

Speaking of Huntington Hartford...
 
He did the company no favors. If only we still had these--including the cars--not mention those great L.A. A&Ps of the Deco era seen here previously....


https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-S...2520AM.bmp.jpg
Grand opening, Van Nuys


https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-z...arcadia120.jpg
Grand opening, Arcadia


Worthwhile reading: the new book The Great A&P and the Struggle for Small Business in America--might sound dry, but it's not. The "Walmart Effect" is nothing new....

Photos: John R. Barker/Groceteria

austlar1 Nov 19, 2011 9:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 3940dxer (Post 5485844)
And, GaylordWilshire, your post reminded me of this classic shot, in which Sophia Loren gazes disapprovingly into Jayne Mansfields bra-less decolletage. 1957, Romanoff's Restaurant, Beverly Hills. Looks like the meal hadn't started yet - it must have been one slow dinner!

http://wwww.dkse.net/david/Cleavage.jpg
Public Domain

Miss Mansfield was killed in an auto accident near Biloxi, Mississippi in 1967. Her car crashed into the rear of a tractor-trailer that had slowed because of a truck that was spraying mosquito fogger.

I have never seen the Sophia Loren/Jayne Mansfield photo. What a classic image! This thread just keeps on delivering the goods. It is easily the best thing going on SSP- always interesting and informative and always civil in tone. Thanks so much to the dedicated forumers who LA Noir going strong.

ethereal_reality Nov 20, 2011 1:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sopas ej (Post 5484650)
A little more Burbank.

A parade in downtown Burbank, 1952, headed down San Fernando Blvd., crossing Olive Avenue.
http://img69.imageshack.us/img69/735...parade1952.jpg
USC Archive

The same corner today.
http://img217.imageshack.us/img217/3747/picture3bi.png
Google Street View



It galls me to see that inept modernization of the Whelan Drugs Building.
At first I thought it was an entirely different building until I noticed the windows.


http://img714.imageshack.us/img714/8...nkbdetail2.jpg
Google Street View detail





below: Another view of the Whelan Drugs Building.

http://img266.imageshack.us/img266/2...kolive1954.jpg
http://wesclark.com/burbank/olive_1954.jpg




Below: The San Fernando Road side...painted tan.

http://img824.imageshack.us/img824/7...live1954b1.jpg
Google Street View

I wonder how much of the original building is intact underneath that 'Home Depot' makeover?

ethereal_reality Nov 20, 2011 2:12 AM

I just found this photo of the Whelan Building from the 1960s. PAN right---->



http://img20.imageshack.us/img20/782...nandordoli.jpg
http://wesclark.com/burbank/san_fern...e_at_right.jpg


This is San Fernando Road with Olive Avenue at the right.

If you go back and look at sopas' 1952 photo you can spot both Maxwell's and Mayor Jewelers...as well as the Coca-Cola sign.

_______

ethereal_reality Nov 20, 2011 2:35 AM

....and here's a photo of that $335,000 city hall.

http://img221.imageshack.us/img221/2...l1950sburq.jpg
http://wesclark.com/burbank/city_hall_1950s.jpg

sopas ej Nov 20, 2011 3:57 AM

:previous:
Burbank City Hall is a gem of a building. The lobby is gorgeous, in that WPA Streamline Moderne way. It looks like a movie set from "Mommie Dearest" or something.
http://www.opendeco.es/wp-content/up...l_Rotunda2.jpg
opendeco.es

http://livingnewdeal.berkeley.edu/ma...0307004010.jpg
livingnewdeal.berkeley.edu

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2711/...c64b91eaee.jpg
Photo by Michael Locke

http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/.a/6...012b970d-250wi
LA Times

http://mediacitygroove.com/awritersg...03/023_20a.jpg
mediacitygroove.com

http://img.groundspeak.com/waymarkin...ef8578b5bc.jpg
waymarking.com

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi..._City_Hall.JPG
Wikipedia

Being that this building was constructed during WWII, I wouldn't doubt the eagle motifs were nods to patriotism.

sopas ej Nov 20, 2011 5:49 AM

I thought I'd return to the gas tanks and Brew 102.

1953
http://jpg3.lapl.org/pics37/00068070.jpg
LAPL

I don't remember if this was already covered here on this thread, but the brewery was originally the site of El Aliso (for which Aliso Street was named) a 400-year-old, six-story-high sycamore tree under which the Tongva native American tribe leaders would gather for conferences. It was also known as the "council tree." Yangna, of course, was the name of the Tongva village before the Spaniards arrived.

http://viewfromaloft.typepad.com/pho...zed/vignes.jpg
viewfromaloft.org

Here's a link that gives some history: http://www.viewfromaloft.org/2007/01...ibes_gath.html

http://wikimapia.org/p/00/00/76/82/49_big.jpg
Wikimapia

http://wikimapia.org/p/00/00/76/82/48_big.jpg
Wikimapia

Here's another history-talkin' link: http://wikimapia.org/1342988/Yangna-...r-Brewery-site

GaylordWilshire Nov 20, 2011 10:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sopas ej (Post 5486741)
Burbank City Hall is a gem of a building. The lobby is gorgeous, in that WPA Streamline Moderne way. It looks like a movie set from "Mommie Dearest" or something.
http://www.opendeco.es/wp-content/up...l_Rotunda2.jpg
opendeco.es


I can see that...
https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-X...6%252520AM.jpghttp://www.liveauctioneers.com/item/6458662
"Watercolor on illustration board by David Negron. Set design painting showing the
living room at Christmas in the film "Mommie Dearest" (Paramount Pictures, 1981)"

sopas ej Nov 20, 2011 3:45 PM

"I should have known you'd know where to find the boys, AND the booze!"

http://davelandweb.com/celebs/images/MommieDearest3.jpg
davelandweb.com

The house used for the exterior shots of "Mommie Dearest" is at 417 Amapola Lane, in the exclusive LA neighborhood of Bel Air. Of course, a true Bel Air resident would write the address as "417 Amapola Ln., Los Angeles, CA 90077." Kinda like the nouveau-riche celebrity trash that move to Montecito, near Santa Barbara, say they live/write their address as being Montecito, but a true old-money Montecito resident would actually write their address as being Santa Barbara.
http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2424/3...113f9f6f_b.jpg
flickr T Hoffarth

GaylordWilshire Nov 20, 2011 9:05 PM

the hyphen
 
:previous:

And then there is the hyphen, which was part of the original name but which has fallen out of use, probably thanks to Chevrolet.

http://belair.losangelesrealestatevo...gneastgate.jpgLARealEstateVoice

http://jpg1.lapl.org/pics22/00030992.jpgLAPL

Horthos Nov 21, 2011 10:35 AM

6th street bridge to be demolished.

http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la...0,887670.story

Sadly, I am not surprised, knowing the history of this city, and its love of destroying its history.

FredH Nov 21, 2011 7:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Horthos (Post 5487794)
6th street bridge to be demolished.

http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la...0,887670.story

Sadly, I am not surprised, knowing the history of this city, and its love of destroying its history.

(from the story) Caltrans inspected the bridge about 13 months ago. The 11-page report documents extensive cracking and notes that the bridge's signature arches are rusted and the paint is faded, peeling and dirty. "There are some problems," said Maria Raptis, a spokeswoman, "but it is safe."

Yet the city engineers decided it was not safe and had to be replaced. I smell a rat here somewhere.

And by the way, how long has the Brooklyn Bridge been around?

malumot Nov 21, 2011 9:48 PM

Surprised? It's hilarious.

"The community said we wanted something new and different."

Appears "the community" was mixed. But ohh well. Gauging "community" sentiment means bureaucratic jobs for Outreach Coordinators.

"Council members worried about whether the federal government, which will pay for most of the $401-million project, will come through...."

They want a bridge, but ESPECIALLY want somebody else to pay for it.

"The process will include extensive public outreach, including an aesthetic advisory committee ....."

More bureaucratic jobs....

"The city also agreed to take steps to try to memorialize the condemned bridge, promising to make a broadcast-quality documentary and publish a booklet with black and white photos on the Los Angeles River bridges, and erect informational plaques......"

All this from a city that is essentially broke.

And finally, the gut-buster: "Construction could begin in about three years and take four years....."

That would be 2018/2019.

I'm putting the over/under at 2025.





Quote:

Originally Posted by Horthos (Post 5487794)
6th street bridge to be demolished.

http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la...0,887670.story

Sadly, I am not surprised, knowing the history of this city, and its love of destroying its history.


GaylordWilshire Nov 21, 2011 10:08 PM

https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-N...2520AM.bmp.jpgLAPL

sopas ej Nov 22, 2011 1:50 AM

Hollywood, 1966--the Earl Carroll Theatre was the Hullabaloo Club. If I were a teen, I'd wanna time-travel back to the Hollywood of 1966 and go there. Maybe even do the Jerk. :-P

In the video, at 2:06, you can see a vacant lot where once stood the gorgeous Streamline Moderne NBC radio studios. I wonder if those kids even appreciated that building, or anything else from the previous generation.

Video Link

ethereal_reality Nov 22, 2011 1:52 AM

:previous: That is a great video sopas!




The hyphen is absent in the cartouche on the Bel Air Gates.

http://img802.imageshack.us/img802/4...elairgates.jpg
LAPL





http://img573.imageshack.us/img573/3...rcartouche.jpg
http://www.nycopenhouse.com/.a/6a00e...361bf25970b-pi

ethereal_reality Nov 22, 2011 2:25 AM

Beverly Hills with the magnificent Beverly Wilshire Hotel in the distance.


http://img257.imageshack.us/img257/2...lshirehote.jpg
LAPL


Would one of you automobile aficionados tell me the make of this beautiful white car?

ethereal_reality Nov 22, 2011 2:49 AM

A great aerial view of the Bernheimer mansion and gardens 300 feet above Hollywood, circa 1914
(that water tank you see above the mansion is no longer there...I checked)



http://img208.imageshack.us/img208/6...rnheinerjg.jpg
found on ebay


Today it is known as Yamashiro's. The link below has a history of the Bernheimer brother's 'mountain palace'.

http://www.yamashirorestaurant.com/history/



below: An aerial view today with emphasis on parking.

http://img714.imageshack.us/img714/7515/bern1today.jpg
google earth

______

GaylordWilshire Nov 22, 2011 2:51 AM

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-q...2520PM.bmp.jpgLAT10-21-1923

https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-C...airarticle.jpgLAT1-27-1924

Well, you know, e_r, I'm going to stick by that hyphen...


P.S. That's a '37 Dodge in the Beverly Hills pic--possibly a '36, but I'm going to say '37.

ethereal_reality Nov 22, 2011 3:16 AM

:previous: I believe you about the hyphen GW. Obviously there wasn't any room for it in that cartouche. :)

Oh, and thx for the car info GW, or is that G-W with a hyphen? ;)

GaylordWilshire Nov 22, 2011 3:40 AM

:previous:

Well, how about Gaylord_Wilshire?

Fab Fifties Fan Nov 22, 2011 5:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 5488679)
Beverly Hills with the magnificent Beverly Wilshire Hotel in the distance.


http://img257.imageshack.us/img257/2...lshirehote.jpg
LAPL


Would one of you automobile aficionados tell me the make of this beautiful white car?

yep G_W called it. 1937 Dodge Business Coupe. They came with or without rumble seat.

~Jon Paul

3940dxer Nov 22, 2011 3:46 PM

National Schools (aka National Electronics Schools) at 4000 S. Figueroa, near 40th Place. (From old exam booklet.)

http://wwww.dkse.net/david/National.schools.jpg

The building is gone. (Google street view.)

http://wwww.dkse.net/david/4000.s.fig.jpg

GaylordWilshire Nov 22, 2011 4:14 PM

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-n...2520AM.bmp.jpg

Possibly posted before, but it's interesting to note how much more urban--and interesting--the intersection of Figueroa and Santa Barbara/MLK appeared 80 years ago.http://jpg2.lapl.org/pics08/00013947.jpgLAPL
Looking south on Fig toward SB/MLK.

GaylordWilshire Nov 22, 2011 4:18 PM

https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-l...2520AM.bmp.jpgLAPL

GaylordWilshire Nov 22, 2011 10:45 PM

http://jpg3.lapl.org/pics36/00067689.jpgLAPL

ethereal_reality Nov 22, 2011 11:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GaylordWilshire (Post 5489189)
Possibly posted before, but it's interesting to note how much more urban--and interesting--the intersection of Figueroa and Santa Barbara/MLK appeared 80 years ago.http://jpg2.lapl.org/pics08/00013947.jpgLAPL
Looking south on Fig toward SB/MLK.



The same intersection on the night of March 6, 1966.


http://img522.imageshack.us/img522/6...uthonfigue.jpg
LAPD

The description of the photo according to LAPL is "looking south on Figueroa at Exposition Blvd." *
The city streets have become a perilous no man's land of crime, due to curfew in effect 9pm, Saturday night.

*Exposition Blvd. is an error...it should be Santa Barbara/MLK.

_____


below: The Coliseum Hotel. (this is the hotel that appears on the left in the above photographs)

http://img12.imageshack.us/img12/118...gueroalapl.jpg
LAPL

ethereal_reality Nov 22, 2011 11:31 PM

A couple more views of the intersection....this time in 1955.



http://img214.imageshack.us/img214/5...rawestatfi.jpg
uncanny.net

http://www.uncanny.net/~wetzel/fiveline.htm




http://img190.imageshack.us/img190/4...tabarbarau.jpg
uncanny.net

http://www.uncanny.net/~wetzel/fiveline.htm

GaylordWilshire Nov 22, 2011 11:39 PM

http://jpg1.lapl.org/00075/00075543.jpgLAPL

https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-1...2520PM.bmp.jpgGoogle Street View

Here's a church I wasn't aware of before: the University Christian Church under construction at the ne corner of
Santa Barbara and Budlong in 1924, and now. Not sure what's going on with the scoring or chalk marks on the east
face or how it was to tie in with the wing now to the east. The UCC congregation moved out toward the airport
around 1960; the old building is now the University Seventh-day Adventist Church.

Sometimes I look at pictures of this part of town--especially to the east toward Figueroa as seen in recent shots of
the SB/MLK-Fig intersection--and, where the entire cityscape isn't now given over to filling stations and strip malls and
there are still some neighborhoods of big old frame houses and bungalows under classic palms---and I wonder, what
happened? I know there are all the usual reasons of demographics, but I am still amazed by how much was just seemingly
so easily let go.

ethereal_reality Nov 22, 2011 11:52 PM

:previous: What a beautiful church Gaylord_Wilshire.
I've used google street views to view many of these old neighborhoods. What surprised me the most was the abundance
of old frame houses. There seems to be 10x more than I had previously expected.
I'd like to post some of the better ones on here but I was afraid you guys might think it was boring.



Let me point out the Fox Figueroa Theater.

http://img214.imageshack.us/img214/5...rawestatfi.jpg
uncanny.net




below: A wonderful photograph of the Fox Figueroa Theater.


http://img841.imageshack.us/img841/8...gueroalapl.jpg
LAPL


http://img266.imageshack.us/img266/7...atheaterin.jpg
https://digital.lib.washington.edu/a...tructures/906/

_____

GaylordWilshire Nov 23, 2011 1:11 AM

:previous:

e_r: I for one would not find it boring--I'm practically obsessed with L.A. domestic architecture up to WW2.

As for the Figueroa Theatre, I see that it also houses a branch of the McColloch Drug Co. It was small chain--the only other one I've ever seen a picture of was at Main & 9th:

http://jpg3.lapl.org/pics35/00067464.jpgLAPL
The buildings, if not the traffic tower, are still there. I assume those are clocks above the 4th floor on the far building;
they've been removed. Interesting how far off the corner that Acme signal is. Makes you wonder about the primitive
signaling and signage for cars in those days--supposedly there was less traffic then, but then there is plenty of
documentation of how congested downtown was--anyway, primitive traffic control, cars with zero safety features--
the accidents, as we've seen here from time to time, must have been really gruesome.

3940dxer Nov 23, 2011 1:37 AM

When I started exploring this thread a photo of the Hotel Nadeau caught my eye. I can't find that page now (despite much searching!), but would like to reply to it and add some comments.

I like ghost towns and in reading about them the name Nadeau comes up again and again. Remi Nadeau was a French-Canadian entrepreneur who came to California in 1861. He built up a very successful freight operation that catered to the burgeoning silver and gold mines in eastern California. This was quite brilliant - the mines went boom and bust, but Nadeau's stage company always stayed busy. In most cases, gold. silver, lead, and other metals were brought from the mines to San Pedro by Nadeau's animal teams, and then went to San Francisco by ship. (Back then there was no efficient route over the Sierras.)

He also built a large hotel in L.A., which had the city's first elevator. It was at 1st and Spring, where the L.A. Times building is now.

The great grandson of Mr. Nadeau is an accomplished historian who has published many excellent books about the early days of L.A., California, and the mining camps.

There are a lot of great images in the book - I'll start with some images of hotels and Chinatown.

The first two images here are from USC and LAPL, the rest are from City-Makers, The Story Of Southern California's First Boom 1868-1876 (pub. 1965).

http://dkse.net/david/nadeau1905.2.jpg




http://dkse.net/david/nadeaupostcard_lap.jpg




http://dkse.net/david/Nadeau/nadeau.illus.jpg




Here are an line drawing of Downey Block, the Lafayette Hotel "bus" ;) and Chinatown:

http://dkse.net/david/Nadeau/Downey.Block.jpg




http://dkse.net/david/Nadeau/Lafayette.hotel.bus.jpg


http://dkse.net/david/Nadeau/Chinatown.1880s.jpg
(I wonder what hill that is in the background?)

3940dxer Nov 23, 2011 1:57 AM

In the first days of exploring this thread a photo of the Hotel Nadeau caught my eye. I can't find that page now (despite much searching!), but would like to reply to it and add some comments.

In my explorations of California history and ghost towns, the name Nadeau comes up over and over. Remi Nadeau was a French-Canadian entrepreneur to came to California in 1861. He built up a very successful freight operation that catered to the burgeoning silver and gold mines in eastern California. This was quite brilliant - the mines went boom and bust, but Nadeau's stage company always stayed busy. In most cases, gold. silver, lead, and other metals were brought from the mines to San Pedro by Nadeau, and then shipped to San Francisco. (Back then there was no efficient route over the Sierras.)

He also built a large hotel in L.A., which had the city's first elevator. It was at 1st and Spring, where the L.A. Times building is now.

The great grandson of Mr. Nadeau is an accomplished historian who has published many excellent books about the early days of California and the mining camps.

There are a lot of great images in the book - I'll start with some shots of downtown and old hotels.

The first two are from USC and LAPL, the others are from Remi Nadeau's City-Makers, The Story Of Southern California's First Boom 1868-1876 (pub. 1965). The post card seems to be a "colorized" version of the photo above it.


http://dkse.net/david/nadeau1905.2.jpg




http://dkse.net/david/nadeaupostcard_lap.jpg




http://dkse.net/david/Nadeau/nadeau.illus.jpg




Here are an line drawing of Downey Block, the Lafayette Hotel bus ;) and Chinatown:

http://dkse.net/david/Nadeau/Downey.Block.jpg




http://dkse.net/david/Nadeau/Lafayette.hotel.bus.jpg


http://dkse.net/david/Nadeau/Chinatown.1880s.jpg
(I wonder what hill that is in the background?)

FredH Nov 23, 2011 2:54 AM

Nadeau
 
Pearblossom Highway cuts across southeast Palmdale, California in the Mojave Desert. I believe it was a widening and straightening of various roads heading east. One of the old roads that was cut off in the process is here:

http://img525.imageshack.us/img525/6897/nadeauz.jpg
Google Street View

(yes it snows in the high desert)

I read that Remi Nadeau ran mule teams between Los Angeles and silver mines in the northern Mojave desert. I wonder if this is what's left of one of his old routes?

ethereal_reality Nov 23, 2011 3:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 3940dxer (Post 5490000)
http://dkse.net/david/Nadeau/Chinatown.1880s.jpg
(I wonder what hill that is in the background?)

Great post 3940dxer! Nadeau was a very interesting man.

per your question: I don't see a hill in the above photo....I believe it's a 3 or 4 story building (I could be wrong).

_____


below: The ram-shackled building along Calle de los Negros was eventually replaced by this rather impressive building.

http://img46.imageshack.us/img46/774...ey1910susc.jpg
usc digital archive




below: In the 1940s the 'calle de los negros' building sported a tacky new entrance
that was advertised as the "shortest route to Union Station".

http://img26.imageshack.us/img26/941...40shortest.jpg
LAPL


gsjansen covered these details much better than I have back in Jan. 2011.

Here is the link to his amazing post.
http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...postcount=2519

_______

ethereal_reality Nov 23, 2011 3:34 AM

If you look closely you can find the 'calle de los negros' building in the lower left of this striking aerial photo.

http://img705.imageshack.us/img705/1...rosaerialu.jpg
usc digital archive


I have a question...is that Brew 102 at upper left with the smoke emanating from the smoke stack?
Also...what is the extremely long building just beyond this factory/brewery? Is it a R.R. building?

At the extreme upper right is the bottom half of the enormous Los Angeles County Hospital.

_____

3940dxer Nov 23, 2011 4:02 AM

FredH and ethereal_reality, thanks for the replies.

Fred, I appreciate the photo and you may well be right about the route name. In the eastern Sierras and in the Mojave I've seen his name in many places. I think his grandson Remi Nadeau, though in his 90's, is still alive and has been active in recent years. I've been wondering if he is reachable by email and might respond to questions. He is a true authority on California history and has a huge collection of family photos and artifacts, going way back.

e_r, those are great photos. I'm not sure what "Old Los Angeles" was but I imagine a little searching would explain it. I don't understand how there could have been very much distance between the two stations if they were both in downtown L.A., but I'm probably missing something. And good one on spotting Calle de los Negros in the aerial shot - I'd never have noticed that.

GaylordWilshire Nov 23, 2011 2:51 PM

https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-R...2520AM.bmp.jpgUSCDL

The Home Company? The Rome Company?

transitfan Nov 23, 2011 4:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 3940dxer (Post 5489169)
National Schools (aka National Electronics Schools) at 4000 S. Figueroa, near 40th Place. (From old exam booklet.)

http://wwww.dkse.net/david/National.schools.jpg

The building is gone. (Google street view.)

http://wwww.dkse.net/david/4000.s.fig.jpg

Wow! I didn't know they had torn down that building, it was still there when I moved from So. California in mid-1998. I used to see it every day going home from work at USC. Until the Harbor Transitway opened, my 446 bus, would turn east onto MLKing Blvd from Figueroa to get to the entrance to the southbound Harbor Freeway.

PHX31 Nov 23, 2011 4:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 5489828)
:previous: What a beautiful church Gaylord_Wilshire.
I've used google street views to view many of these old neighborhoods. What surprised me the most was the abundance
of old frame houses. There seems to be 10x more than I had previously expected.
I'd like to post some of the better ones on here but I was afraid you guys might think it was boring.



Let me point out the Fox Figueroa Theater.

http://img214.imageshack.us/img214/5...rawestatfi.jpg
uncanny.net




below: A wonderful photograph of the Fox Figueroa Theater.


http://img841.imageshack.us/img841/8...gueroalapl.jpg
LAPL


http://img266.imageshack.us/img266/7...atheaterin.jpg
https://digital.lib.washington.edu/a...tructures/906/

_____

Beautiful theater and a great sign. Interesting, if you look at the sign in each picture they are different. At some point it was the "Figueroa Theater"... and at another point it became the "Fox Figueroa Theater". I wonder which came first. Probably Figueroa Theater --> Fox Figueroa Theater. Looks like they had to expand the sign upwards slightly to include "Fox".... unless they made a whole new sign that looked almost the same just slightly taller. They sure don't make signs like they used to.


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