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jg6544 May 16, 2013 11:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tourmaline (Post 6131126)
Hall of Justice parking indicates this was before advent of Fire Lanes or selective parking law enforcement. :uhh:

So many photos on this thread depict banners hung from government buildings and street overhangs suggesting a celebration or the city fathers liked to make LA look like it was a perpetual party town or advertising friendly. I suspect photographers were more inclined to remove their lens caps when colorful banners were present. In the banner-laden photos above, what was the city celebrating? (Seems like the early '20s at the latest, which would suggest this is not Frank Shaw's b'day.)




1950 - Where is the newest Statler Hilton be built? Traffic Island seems safe enough . . . ?
http://catalog.library.ca.gov/exlibr...HS1JGGXBKV.jpghttp://catalog.library.ca.gov/exlibr...HS1JGGXBKV.jpg



Same place it's being torn down now to be replaced with that new "tallest in L. A." tower that I am very skeptical will ever get built.

Lwize May 16, 2013 11:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rbpjr (Post 6131043)
I'm PALMed out!!!

I didn't want to be the first to say something... ;)

JScott May 16, 2013 11:45 PM

Since some on this thread apparently don't want to see discussion or pictures of the oldest living thing in Los Angeles anymore, I'll just leave this here.

Perhaps the earliest-known photo of the Hammel palms.

If we assume the young boy is Sheriff Hammel, age 8 or 9, and knowing he was born in 1865, then that dates this image to 1873-4.

Flyingwedge May 17, 2013 12:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JScott (Post 6131395)
Since some on this thread apparently don't want to see discussion or pictures of the oldest living thing in Los Angeles anymore, I'll just leave this here.

Perhaps the earliest-known photo of the Hammel palms.

If we assume the young boy is Sheriff Hammel, age 8 or 9, and knowing he was born in 1865, then that dates this image to 1873-4.

Awesome photo and great find! Thanks for providing the link. Not many living things have a photographic record going back 140 years, especially in three different locations.

ProphetM May 17, 2013 12:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tourmaline (Post 6131126)
1899 - Spanish American War Victory Celebration at Los Angeles Depot. (??)
http://catalog.library.ca.gov/exlibr...7SRKBMTCJ8.jpghttp://catalog.library.ca.gov/exlibr...7SRKBMTCJ8.jpg

That's the Southern Pacific River Station, located in what is now the Los Angeles State Historic Park, on Spring Street approximately opposite Sotello St. It was largely replaced by the Arcade Depot in 1888, but continued to be used for freight, and passenger trains still stopped there until 1901. It was torn down in 1902.

Flyingwedge May 17, 2013 12:45 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AlvaroLegido (Post 6128040)
Thanks a lot alanlutz for this interactive map ! Looking at it, I noticed that the section just south of "El Plueblo de Los Angeles" is called "The Slot". I didn't know that. Does anyone know why ?

That's referring to the section of Hwy 101 there that is below grade. I guess they could have called it a lot of things; the cut, the groove, the channel . . . .

CityBoyDoug May 17, 2013 1:10 AM

Rockets Red Glare
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Tourmaline (Post 6131126)
Hall of Justice parking indicates this was before advent of Fire Lanes or selective parking law enforcement. :uhh:

So many photos on this thread depict banners hung from government buildings and street overhangs suggesting a celebration or the city fathers liked to make LA look like it was a perpetual party town or advertising friendly. I suspect photographers were more inclined to remove their lens caps when colorful banners were present. In the banner-laden photos above, what was the city celebrating? (Seems like the early '20s at the latest, which would suggest this is not Frank Shaw's b'day.)

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v4...ps70974cbe.jpg

http://imageshack.us/a/img541/9382/a...in1928ebay.jpg

Looking at the angle of the Sun, I would guess it was a nice bright July 4th.

Flyingwedge May 17, 2013 1:47 AM

752-54-56 S. Los Angeles Street
 
It's 100 years old this year. This photo is undated:
http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...ps5c771812.jpg
USC Digital Library -- http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/si...id/20765/rec/2

Closeup of entrance:
http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...ps772e45e2.jpg

Lobby scrollwork, 1927:
http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...psf02c9bc5.jpg
USC Digital Library -- http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/co...id/26405/rec/4

Undated building front with no sign at top:
http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...psf799eb5a.jpg
USC Digital Library -- http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/si...id/20784/rec/3

Side view, 1926:
http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...ps0f326fda.jpg
USC Digital Library -- http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/si...d/22337/rec/10

May 2011; the window boxes are gone:
http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...psc54f073e.jpg
GSV

The entrance:
http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...psda2ed8b4.jpg
GSV

And from the side. The Grayco Bldg is now the RS Building, and the next door Connell Buildings are now the Cornell Buildings:
http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...ps9a50eb61.jpg
GSV

ethereal_reality May 17, 2013 3:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Flyingwedge (Post 6131519)


Grayco Building.
100 years old this year.

Lobby scrollwork, 1927:
http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...psf02c9bc5.jpg
USC Digital Library -- http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/co...id/26405/rec/4

Oh my, this is so beautiful. Has any of this survived? The entrance today looks like you're stepping into Hades. :(

__

Wig-Wag May 17, 2013 4:36 AM

Harold Lloyd - Hot Water
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 6131330)
from http://justacarguy.blogspot.com/

http://imageshack.us/a/img801/8414/a...lloydinhot.jpg

Anyone recognize that street corner? (I don't know the name of the film....sorry.)
__

ER, the scene is from the 1924 Harold Lloyd film Hot Water, and can be seen in this YouTube clip: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CMneroBlKho

Maybe some can identify the intersection from the clip.

Cheers,
Jack

ethereal_reality May 17, 2013 2:35 PM

Thanks Wig-Wag!

tovangar2 May 17, 2013 7:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Flyingwedge (Post 6131440)
Awesome photo and great find! Thanks for providing the link. Not many living things have a photographic record going back 140 years, especially in three different locations.

I'd like to second that. The photo of the two Hammel children under the palms is a wonderful find.

Sometimes a subject so captures the imagination of many of us on the thread that one wants to know everything (the remnants of the San Fernando and Sunset hotels was another I, for one, could not get enough of). Thanks to JScott and especially Flyingwedge we now know everything possible. Eminently satisfying. Amazing work.

Congratulations too to JScott for finding the large version of the photo of the Longstreet Palms framing Library Tower. That's a favorite image. Excellent post at your blog.

tovangar2 May 17, 2013 7:52 PM

.

tovangar2 May 17, 2013 8:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Flyingwedge (Post 6131519)
It's 100 years old this year.
Lobby scrollwork, 1927:
http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...psf02c9bc5.jpg
USC Digital Library -- http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/co...id/26405/rec/4

Thank you so much for your latest post. The lobby photo in particular is wonderfully evocative. I cannot for the life of me though figure out what's going on in the street. Could someone explain it to me?

tovangar2 May 17, 2013 8:56 PM

Curbed Los Angeles put up 21 pix of the Sunset Strip through the years today. Not an amazing post, but still nice to see:
http://la.curbed.com/archives/2013/0..._21_photos.php

Flyingwedge May 17, 2013 9:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tovangar2 (Post 6132426)
Thank you so much for your latest post. The lobby photo in particular is wonderfully evocative. I cannot for the life of me though figure out what's going on in the street. Could someone explain it to me?

You're welcome! If I had to guess, I'd say that pile in the street are cobblestones dug up just out of camera range that are going to be hauled away in that truck.

Chuckaluck May 18, 2013 12:00 AM

http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3156/2...3bfd934a_o.jpghttp://farm4.staticflickr.com/3156/2...3bfd934a_o.jpghttp://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...ostcount=12508



Circa '65
[IMG]http://catalog.library.ca.gov/exlibr...R8U8FII47M.jpghttp://catalog.library.ca.gov/exlibr...R8U8FII47M.jpg



http://catalog.library.ca.gov/exlibr...3RFQ92G24J.jpghttp://catalog.library.ca.gov/exlibr...3RFQ92G24J.jpg





Standard station (above) prompted a look for other nearby stations.

1980 Noir-photo. Eighth Street at Towne Avenue Interesting scalloped openings at Firestone.

http://catalog.library.ca.gov/exlibr...CT4TNEAY2S.jpghttp://catalog.library.ca.gov/exlibr...CT4TNEAY2S.jpg


Another station (Shell) in search of an address. Dohner Herbert & Co Ford Mercury?
1951
http://catalog.library.ca.gov/exlibr...BNT1PQ8BRD.jpghttp://catalog.library.ca.gov/exlibr...BNT1PQ8BRD.jpg

Chuckaluck May 18, 2013 12:21 AM

No date - "Trolley on Huntington Drive?"

http://collection.pasadenadigitalhis...ile&DMROTATE=0http://collection.pasadenadigitalhis...ile&DMROTATE=0




http://collection.pasadenadigitalhis...ile&DMROTATE=0http://collection.pasadenadigitalhis...ile&DMROTATE=0
http://collection.pasadenadigitalhis...ile&DMROTATE=0http://collection.pasadenadigitalhis...ile&DMROTATE=0





1950 - A chill in the Pasadena air at Willis Fallis Used Auto Sales. "Just changed topped up the antifreeze." "Watch you step! "
http://catalog.library.ca.gov/exlibr...7URA8C188Q.jpg http://catalog.library.ca.gov/exlibr...7URA8C188Q.jpg

ethereal_reality May 18, 2013 12:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 6131031)
Richfield Oil Co., Station No. 16, Los Angeles area -no exact street address

http://imageshack.us/a/img24/6514/aa...arichfield.jpg
ebay

I didn't realize Richfield's service stations were identified by numbers.


The Costa Macaroni MFG. Co. across the street
http://imageshack.us/a/img541/3917/a...richfieldc.jpg
detail

___

I found the Costa Macaroni MFG. Co. listed in the 1929 City Directory.

http://imageshack.us/a/img341/8050/a...main1929di.jpg
lapl

-2119 N. Main Street.

Could the cupola we see in the distance be part of the Los Angeles/Eastside Brewery at 2100 N. Main Street?

http://imageshack.us/a/img13/5568/aabcostarichfield.jpg


...but then I noticed the street number 2221 above the door of the Richfield Station. (I missed it the first time around. duh)

http://imageshack.us/a/img703/3917/a...richfieldc.jpg
detail

hmmmm.

So was the station's address 2221 S. Avenue 21? -the side street?
It still doesn't add up. The angles seem all wrong. :(
__

tovangar2 May 18, 2013 12:38 AM

The Hazard Taft Family
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Chuckaluck (Post 6126211)
Fountains? What about canals or zanjas?

Pershing Square, circa 1880
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/dn...=w1006-h384-no
uscdl

Apparently a zanja ran along the 5th and Olive sides of what-was-to-be Pershing Square in early days.

As Pershing Square has come up again and some great pix of the Title Guarantee and Trust Building have been posted, I thought I'd set down what I've read about the pioneer family that once owned the block to the north of the park (not officially a park until declared so by city ordinance in 1870). One of the few bits of real estate in the city, another is the Plaza, that's never changed hands.

In 1866 Captain Ariel Merrick Hazard (1797-1873) and his son-in-law, Harley A Taft purchased the remote, rural block bounded by 5th, Hill, 4th and Olive for $9.80 at an obviously-not-terribly-well-attended tax sale. The final price may have been closer to $30 after fees and "advertising" were figured in. (Compare this to the $450 paid by Robert Stark in 1870 for the even more remote block bounded by 7th, Flower, 8th and Figueroa: http://articles.latimes.com/1998/aug/23/local/me-15827 - link first posted by ProphetM)

Capt Hazard (originally from Vermont), his wife, Eleanor, and children, including Mary Eleanor (1841-1933) George Washington (1842-1914) and Henry Thomas (1844-1921) had come to Los Angeles in 1854 by covered wagon from Michigan. Harley Taft (1826-1906) arrived from R.I. traveling around the Horn. Mary E Hazard and Harley Taft were married in LA in 1856.

Harley and Mary built a home on 5th St near Hill, facing the Park and raised a family. Desperate for neighbors they offered free house lots along the Olive St side of the block. There were no takers. Their son, Alfred Z (1864-1936), was the second of six children, only three of whom lived to adulthood.

An undated view of the original Hazard-Taft house, on 5th St, facing the Park
(it's also in the photo above):
https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-j...93946%2BAM.jpg
http://books.google.com/books?id=kd4...0house&f=false

Later, Mary and Harley built a second, larger home on the corner of 5th and Hill. This view is circa 1890:
https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-I...95738%2BAM.jpg
http://books.google.com/books?id=kd4...0house&f=false

(These homes were cleared, of course, in 1904 to build the California Club, which in turn, fell in favor of the Title Guarantee and Trust building in 1930.)


George W Hazard, a businessman, was also our most important early historian. Between the 1880's and 1905 he amassed a wealth of photographs and other material on Los Angeles. The collection is housed at the Online Archive of California: http://www.oac.cdlib.org/findaid/ark...88916qc/admin/

"Of all the local collectors who have given their time and energy to the fascinating pursuit of collecting old material, Mr Hazard is far and away the leader. He has gathered thousands of photographs and negatives. With him this is a hobby...Mr Hazard has been most energetic and zealous in gathering everything possible relating to the early history of Los Angeles. He has photographs of pioneers, views of buildings, views of historic structures in the interior - everything that has borne on the life of the county has been fish to his net. He himself can turn almost at will to any view illustrating a point he desires to make, but this facility is possessed by no one else. His collection has has been of so great importance that on recent occasions he has been called to the witness stand to testify as to the condition of property at a given time, always with the photographic proof to sustain his evidence."

Quoted from "Preserving Historical Data" by WS Broke, July 1911 issue, Out West magazine
http://books.google.com/books?id=GW4...rendall&f=true
(link first posted by Flyingwedge)

Geo. W. Hazard's saddlery shop:
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-Q...6%252520PM.jpg
islandora

Henry T Hazard returned to Michigan for his law degree at Ann Arbor. Back in LA he married Carrie Geller became a practicing attorney and started a political career, serving as City Attorney and twice as Mayor. He had no time for the elitist Chivalry Democrats. Henry was often a speaker at the Mexican Independence Day celebrations in the 1870s, which were attended by big crowds of people of goodwill from all ancestries, captivating the throngs with a rousing speech in fluid Spanish on each occasion.

It is remembered that at the outset of the Chinese massacre of 1871, Hazard was in a barber's chair being shaved when a mob formed outside. "Just as he was, with his face covered with lather . . . , he mounted a barrel in the middle of the street and remonstrated with the crowd, attempting to stop it. He was rewarded by being shot at."

It was Henry, as you aleady know, who built Hazard's Pavilion in 1887 next to his sister's house on land once sold by the family to George Lehman (of Round House fame) for that purpose, before Lehman lost everything to bankruptcy in 1879.

Circa 1887-1897 view of the back of Hazard's Pavilion. The roof and upper story of the second Hazard-Taft home can be seen at 5th and Hill:
https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-8...93207%2BAM.jpg
usc digital archive (first posted by e_r) detail

The interior of Hazard's Pavilion, thronged in 1903:
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-B...3%252520AM.jpg
water and power

Henry T Hazard Park, 2230 Norfolk St, East LA (a zanja ran through it and, at one time, a train):
https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-2...92444%2BAM.jpg
http://lacreekfreak.wordpress.com/20...#comment-11334

Alfred Z Taft, Harley and Mary's surviving son, grew to adulthood on Pershing Square, married and started his own family on the Hazard-Taft homestead block, but by 1892, already with several children (there were seven in the end), AZ and his wife, Blanche, were finding Pershing Square much too urban and started looking for a new place to build. They looked at property on Hill between 12th and Pico, but thought the $200 price was too high. Instead they moved out to bucolic, temperance-minded Hollywood, taking AZ's parents, Mary and Harley, with them, buying land on the north side of Hollywood Blvd (then Prospect Ave) where Taft Ave is today. AZ planted lemons and did extremely well. He helped start the cooperative Cahuenga Valley Lemon Exchange and developed a way to make lemons last, even if shipped long distances (the lemons are thoroughly washed and then waxed, the method that is still used today). AZ also continued to commute to work downtown as a clothier, a job he finally gave up when he started selling Hollywood real estate out of a shed behind his home.

An undated photo of the pretty Taft farmhouse in Hollywood, surrounded by a white-picket fence. The porch faces south and east:
https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-C...03614%2BAM.jpg
http://books.google.com/books?id=9W4...lywood&f=false

In 1906, the year his father Harley died, AZ Taft's health failed and he moved to Arizona. Alfred Z, Jr (1889-1941), one of the Taft grandkids born back at Pershing Square, dropped out of UCLA (then on the Vermont campus) to handle his father's business interests. Under his father's direction, AZ, Jr enthusiastically embraced a real estate career, turning the lemon orchards into the Taft Tract. He replaced the family home at Hollywood and Taft with the Taft Realty office (GW tells the tale: http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...ostcount=11318 and http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...ostcount=54180) and erected the Taft Building (Walker & Eisen, 1923) on the NE corner of Hollywood and Vine, putting the family's stamp on a second famous LA location. Mary Hazard Taft, the girl who came across the plains by covered wagon in 1854 lived on until 1938, celebrated for being the second-oldest lady in Hollywood (after Caroline Wakeman).

The Taft Building entrance:
https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-a...92734%2BAM.jpg
http://movie-4-buzz.blogspot.com/201...ng-up-for.html

A twilight view:
https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-l...92810%2BAM.jpg
http://movie-4-buzz.blogspot.com/201...ng-up-for.html

Taft Ave on the still lovely Taft tract:
https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/--...03929%2BAM.jpg
gsv


More info:

The Historic Core of Los Angeles by CC Roseman, R Wallach and I Taube, 2005,http://books.google.com/books?id=kd4...0house&f=false

The Story of Hollywood by Gregory Paul Williams, 2011: http://books.google.com/books?id=9W4...lywood&f=false

When Hollywood and I Were Babies by Sally Taft Teschke, Los Angeles Times, 2 December 1934: http://allanellenberger.com/category...ral-histories/

Taft Building History: http://tafthollywood.com/history.html

LACreekFreak on Hazard Park. It has a great history: http://lacreekfreak.wordpress.com/20...#comment-11334


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