SkyscraperPage Forum

SkyscraperPage Forum (https://skyscraperpage.com/forum/index.php)
-   Found City Photos (https://skyscraperpage.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=23)
-   -   noirish Los Angeles (https://skyscraperpage.com/forum/showthread.php?t=170279)

CityBoyDoug Dec 25, 2015 6:05 AM

Georgia Street Receiving Hospital ...1954

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v4...pstmi7inub.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v4...pszbin528e.jpg
nsrla

tovangar2 Dec 25, 2015 6:59 AM

Cooper Do-nuts and the Black Cat
 
Cooper's has been discussed on the thread, but a search for "Black Cat" didn't turn anything up.

The Black Cat has an impressive looking plaque, but events there happened seven years after the Cooper Do-nut Riot, according to Amoeba:

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-9...3%252520PM.jpg
LA conservancy

On 31 December 1966 "Eight undercover police officers from the Los Angeles Police Department raided the bar just after midnight while patrons were exchanging celebratory kisses and embraces. During the struggle, patrons were beaten and dragged out of the bar and into the street.

Fourteen people were arrested and charged with assault and public lewdness. Some patrons managed to escape the chaos of the raid by running across the street and blending into the crowd at New Faces (another gay bar across the road where Circus of Books currently stands)."

-LA Conservancy

History gets rewritten (often just in error) faster than anyone could possibly correct it.

The Black Cat building (Frank L Stiff, 1939) is still there, again housing a business called "The Black Cat", 3909 W Sunset, Silver Lake. It was originally a Safeway:
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-m...5%252520PM.jpg
gsv

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-P...3%252520PM.jpg
amoeba

"May 1959: Seven years before Silver Lake's Black Cat Riot and ten before New York's Stonewall riots, a group of drag queens and hustlers clashed with LAPD officers at Cooper Do-nuts usually considered to be the first gay uprising in modern history.

On the night of the Cooper Do-nuts uprising, five (or three, depending on accounts) patrons were arrested but when the cops tried to shove them into the back of a single cruiser, a struggle ensued and all of the arrested “sex perverts” escaped.

The rest of the patrons (including author John Francis Rechy, who chronicled the happenings in the Main Street "gay ghetto" in his 1963 novel, City of Night) hurled coffee, donuts and paper plates, and more at the officers, forcing them to retreat and later return with larger numbers. When the police returned, a full blown riot ensued and as a result a section of Main was closed for a day. The riots may've been quelled but a spark would seem to have been ignited.

[At] the former home of Cooper’s (apparently located on the ground floor of the Metropolitan Building at 315 5th Street), there is no indication of the site's historic importance."

-amoeba

Is that address right? I seem to remember someone (Beaudry?) saying Cooper Do-nuts was on Main, but now I can't find the post.




And speaking of Frank L Stiff, who designed many small commercial buildings in the 20s and 30s, a 1929 effort of his in WLA has had all the accumulated, extraneous stuff stripped away. It's looking just fine. Brand new really. A very minor, but very welcome "save".

"Before", 10571 W Pico at Prosser:
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-a...8%252520PM.jpg
gsv 2014

"After":
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-5...7%252520AM.jpg
gsv 2015

For decades there was a charming old-time barbershop here on the Prosser side of the building (in the center space), run by a Mr and Mrs Katz. Mr Katz had an incredible beard and a mustache like one never sees anymore. He could tell the most wonderful stories about old LA. My kids got all their haircuts here:
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-E...9%252520PM.jpg
gsv 2014

The pretty, original ironwork is intact (again). I love it when buildings get their transparency back:
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-h...9%252520PM.jpg
gsv 2015

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-I...5%252520PM.jpg
gsv 2014

Some of the ironwork panels are flipped the wrong way. I think they were supposed to be installed in left/right pairs:
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-U...3%252520PM.jpg
gsv 2015

tovangar2 Dec 25, 2015 8:05 AM

Has anyone ever written a historic "landmark" nomination? Is it hard? Someone at the Conservancy read that post about that intact block (W 7th Street, between Coronado and Carondelet) and said I should write the buildings up. I have no idea about any of this. help

Beaudry Dec 25, 2015 8:29 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tovangar2 (Post 7280558)

"May 1959: Seven years before Silver Lake's Black Cat Riot and ten before New York's Stonewall riots, a group of drag queens and hustlers clashed with LAPD officers at Cooper Do-nuts usually considered to be the first gay uprising in modern history.

On the night of the Cooper Do-nuts uprising, five (or three, depending on accounts) patrons were arrested but when the cops tried to shove them into the back of a single cruiser, a struggle ensued and all of the arrested “sex perverts” escaped.

The rest of the patrons (including author John Francis Rechy, who chronicled the happenings in the Main Street "gay ghetto" in his 1963 novel, City of Night) hurled coffee, donuts and paper plates, and more at the officers, forcing them to retreat and later return with larger numbers. When the police returned, a full blown riot ensued and as a result a section of Main was closed for a day. The riots may've been quelled but a spark would seem to have been ignited.

[At] the former home of Cooper’s (apparently located on the ground floor of the Metropolitan Building at 315 5th Street), there is no indication of the site's historic importance."

-amoeba

Is that address right? I seem to remember someone (Beaudry?) saying Cooper Do-nuts was on Main, but now I can't find the post.

Hmm. You know, I began looking into Cooper's some months ago and never finished. I didn't keep any notes, so I'll just toss out into the NLA abyss what I remember, just to keep the ball rolling, on what's obviously a very interesting subject: it's a great story, but has, from what I can tell, little hard history behind it.

That is, the riot occurred in May 1959. It is not recounted again until 2005 (in an interview John Rechy does with Susan Stryker for her book Transgender History, in which Rechy simply states it happened on a "rough stretch of Main"). Only documented account; from there the event becomes accepted fact all over the internet.

Cooper's was supposed to be on Main, but I could find no evidence of a Cooper Donuts on Main, none photographic, nothing in the phone books, etc. The image often used to illustrate Cooper's (from The Exiles) is in fact of a donut shop on the west side of Hill between 4th and 5th.

When it comes to the historical method one anecdotal narration is hardly enough, but as I said, I haven't put much real work into it. While of course an event like this would not have made the Times perhaps there's a primary source like ONE in which it was mentioned? More work needs to be done here and in theory some tangible evidence will surface.

CityBoyDoug Dec 25, 2015 12:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tovangar2 (Post 7280558)
Cooper's has been discussed on the thread, but a search for "Black Cat" didn't turn anything up.

The Black Cat has an impressive looking plaque, but events there happened seven years after the Cooper Do-nut Riot:

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-9...3%252520PM.jpg
LA conservancy

This plaque is ridiculous. "LGBT"...what does that mean? The City of Los Angeles is being silly again and very mean spirited....as usual.

HossC Dec 25, 2015 12:42 PM

:previous:

LGBT = lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender. According to Wikipedia, the term has only been in use since the '90s, so it certainly wouldn't have been used in contemporary reports of the riot.

Going through the 1956 and 1960 City Directories, I've found the following. In 1956 there was a business called Cooper's Wholesale Doughnuts at 215 S Main Street. Neither the business nor the address appear in 1960. At 628 S Olive Street you'll find Cooper's Doughnuts in both CDs, as well as Cooper's Donuts at 316 E 5th Street. The 1960 CD also has Cooper's Do-Nuts at 1018 E 7th Street. After that, Cooper's Donuts at 316 E 5th Street appears in the 61, 62 and 63 CDs, while the business at 628 S Olive Street is listed as Coopers Doughnut (no apostrophe or final "s") in 61 and 62, and as Coopers Doughnuts (regaining its "s") in 63, 64 and 65. It looks like all the variant spellings are used in references to the riot.

Like most accounts that are available online, the version below claims that Coopers Doughnuts was near Harold's and the Waldorf on Main Street, which doesn't fit with any of the addresses above. It's from 'Beyond Walls and Cages: Prisons, Borders, and Global Crisis' edited by Jenna M Loyd, Matt Mitchelson, Andrew Burridge.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...Doughnuts1.jpg
books.google.com

The same Main Street location is mentioned in the paragraph below. It's from an article called 'Block Party: Main Between Fifth and Sixth Streets' on ladowntownnews.com.
Doughnuts and Gay L.A.: The Nickel Diner, which opened last year, almost instantly became a neighborhood favorite. Brunch draws crowds outside the small storefront at 524 S. Main St. every weekend and many come to experience the now famous maple glazed bacon donut. But the Nickel isn’t the first Main Street outpost to hawk those sweet dough rings: Cooper’s Doughnuts, which once occupied a small building on the west side of the street — where a Five Star parking lot now stands — was a popular 24-hour hangout for the gay community, according to Lillian Faderman and Stuart Timmons’ book Gay L.A. In 1959, 10 years before the Stonewall riots in New York helped ignite the national gay rights movement, Cooper’s patrons clashed with police officers who had allegedly harassed customers.
Now all we need is a photograph!

Noircitydame Dec 25, 2015 5:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tovangar2 (Post 7280584)
Has anyone ever written a historic "landmark" nomination? Is it hard? Someone at the Conservancy read that post about that intact block (W 7th Street, between Coronado and Carondelet) and said I should write the buildings up. I have no idea about any of this. help

The California Office of Historic Preservation has technical advisories on how to do nominations (to various registration programs); here's a link to the one for CHLs: http://ohp.parks.ca.gov/pages/1069/f...structions.pdf

general info on the registration process and more links: http://ohp.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=1056

tovangar2 Dec 25, 2015 5:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CityBoyDoug (Post 7280621)
This plaque is ridiculous.

I gotta admit, "Site of the first documented LGBT civil rights demonstration in the nation held on February 11, 1967" sounds very off. Like maybe a bunch of well-mannered church ladies had a little march going with signs and matching t-shirts.

Many of us, not of the mainstream, are often just going about our business, living our lives, and seemingly unaccountably find ourselves in (mostly) one-sided combat. Exjudicial street punishment is way unpleasant.

Anyway, Queerty lists The Black Cat, but not Cooper's.

................................................................................



Thx NCD :-)

HossC Dec 25, 2015 8:02 PM

It's Christmas Day, so I only really had one choice for my Julius Shulman post. Here's a selection of photos from a collection showing decorations at Mr Shulman's house in 1957 and 1958. It's "Job 2512: Shulman (Julius) House, Christmas decorations (Los Angeles, Calif.), 1957, 1958". I've put them together into fours so I don't overload everyone with images.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...1.jpg~original

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...2.jpg~original

I'll finish with this shot of Mr Shulman's tree.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...3.jpg~original

All from Getty Research Institute

Merry Christmas to everyone on NLA, and Joyeux Noël to AlvaroLegido :).

tovangar2 Dec 25, 2015 9:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HossC (Post 7280763)
It's Christmas Day, so I only really had one choice for my Julius Shulman post. Here's a selection of photos from a collection showing decorations at Mr Shulman's house in 1957 and 1958.

Those were delightful Hoss :-)

I admit, I got so caught up in the preparations, that I neglected to wish you all Happy Yuletide on Monday as is my usual wont. We had the best fun ever.

So greetings to fellow Yuletide/Yalda celebrants and Happy Christmas today to devotees of the Roman calendar.

Wig-Wag Dec 25, 2015 10:47 PM

Christmas Decioration by JS
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by HossC (Post 7280763)
It's Christmas Day, so I only really had one choice for my Julius Shulman post. Here's a selection of photos from a collection showing decorations at Mr Shulman's house in 1957 and 1958. It's "Job 2512: Shulman (Julius) House, Christmas decorations (Los Angeles, Calif.), 1957, 1958". I've put them together into fours so I don't overload everyone with images.


I'll finish with this shot of Mr Shulman's tree.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...3.jpg~original

All from Getty Research Institute

Merry Christmas to everyone on NLA, and Joyeux Noël to AlvaroLegido :).

Well done, Hoss!

Cheers,
Jack

austlar1 Dec 26, 2015 2:19 AM

Are you sure the Christmas tree pics were in Julius Shulman's house? The link below is a tour of his home of the past 60 or so years, and it looks nothing like the house in this Christmas tree picture. Some of the other shots are probably from his home.

http://tours.tourfactory.com/tours/tour.asp?t=570714

Beaudry Dec 26, 2015 9:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HossC (Post 7280627)
:previous:


Going through the 1956 and 1960 City Directories, I've found the following. In 1956 there was a business called Cooper's Wholesale Doughnuts at 215 S Main Street. Neither the business nor the address appear in 1960. At 628 S Olive Street you'll find Cooper's Doughnuts in both CDs, as well as Cooper's Donuts at 316 E 5th Street. The 1960 CD also has Cooper's Do-Nuts at 1018 E 7th Street. After that, Cooper's Donuts at 316 E 5th Street appears in the 61, 62 and 63 CDs, while the business at 628 S Olive Street is listed as Coopers Doughnut (no apostrophe or final "s") in 61 and 62, and as Coopers Doughnuts (regaining its "s") in 63, 64 and 65. It looks like all the variant spellings are used in references to the riot.

Like most accounts that are available online, the version below claims that Coopers Doughnuts was near Harold's and the Waldorf on Main Street, which doesn't fit with any of the addresses above. It's from 'Beyond Walls and Cages: Prisons, Borders, and Global Crisis' edited by Jenna M Loyd, Matt Mitchelson, Andrew Burridge.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...Doughnuts1.jpg
books.google.com

The same Main Street location is mentioned in the paragraph below. It's from an article called 'Block Party: Main Between Fifth and Sixth Streets' on ladowntownnews.com.
Doughnuts and Gay L.A.: The Nickel Diner, which opened last year, almost instantly became a neighborhood favorite. Brunch draws crowds outside the small storefront at 524 S. Main St. every weekend and many come to experience the now famous maple glazed bacon donut. But the Nickel isn’t the first Main Street outpost to hawk those sweet dough rings: Cooper’s Doughnuts, which once occupied a small building on the west side of the street — where a Five Star parking lot now stands — was a popular 24-hour hangout for the gay community, according to Lillian Faderman and Stuart Timmons’ book Gay L.A. In 1959, 10 years before the Stonewall riots in New York helped ignite the national gay rights movement, Cooper’s patrons clashed with police officers who had allegedly harassed customers.
Now all we need is a photograph!

HossC, thanks for digging up those addresses! I know I had done that once upon a time, and wish I had kept some records (and didn't have it in me to get after them last night, on Christmas Eve).

Yes, the 215 S Main doesn't jive with the 1959 riot story since the building there was a parking lot by the end of '58.

I recall that, having found the 5th St address, thought it most likely for Exiles, and hipped the guy who runs Reel SF, so it's now on his site as there on 5th. That never really sat well with me though, as it's blocks and blocks from where Mackenzie shot most of the film locations—I have since discovered evidence of the Cooper's on the 400 block of S Hill, in the Theodore Hall images at the Getty. I need to write the fellow who runs the ReelSF blog and let him know!

Plus it doesn't really work with the story anyway, the address on 5th is too far from The Run, all the way on the other side of Wall. If we're talking about the Cooper DN on S Hill by Pershing Square, that would actually make sense, in that it was right there in the cruising circuit.

The 628 Olive address is here, adjacent Clifton's, which was demolished in '60 (Coopers Doughnuts would be the part with the yellow roll-down):
https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5795/...b11b0906_b.jpg
tikiroom


Again, what's worrying is that the primary sources aren't there, a problem for something that appears to be accepted fact. Look at the two references above, for example; in Beyond Walls and Cages, published by University of Georgia in 2012, you'll note there's not even a footnote for the story. It is, apparently, again referencing the 2005 Rechy interview. (Note there is a citation for the part about the police chanting at the transexuals—which comes from pp. 1-2 of Faderman & Timmons' Gay LA—but I couldn't track down the primary source for that, and to be honest, while I'm no expert on the LAPD, it seems anachronistic, dubious.) The ladowntownnews.com story is also taken from Faderman & Timmons' 2006 book; they reference the event and were apparently the first to add the "between the Waldorf and Harold's" part of the story. Unfortunately, googlebooks is omitting the first pages and the footnotes so I'll have to get my hands on an actual copy to see their source, unless someone out there has one!

Let me be clear, I'm not saying it didn't happen or that it wouldn't be an important part of our collective history. However; it's common currency among police officers, for example: eyewitness testimony is the least reliable or credible. And here we have a major event being told 45+ years after it occurred, and the fact-checking is being difficult. That even random, desultory fact-checking would never occur before the event is consigned to academic publishing is, unfortunately, just the state of academia and journalism. But nothing gets by the architectural and cultural historians of NLA, dammit!

Tourmaline Dec 26, 2015 5:31 PM

:previous: http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...ostcount=22137


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v4...ps0a75c476.jpghttp://img.photobucket.com/albums/v4...ps0a75c476.jpg

3940dxer Dec 26, 2015 5:42 PM

Hi all and happy holidays!

I may have asked this question a few years ago, but it’s been on my mind again. As a kid in L.A. in the late 1950’s, there were a couple of times that my parents took me to some kind of coffee shop or burger place where orders were delivered to patrons on some kind of small electric train system, on tracks that ran around the counter (and maybe the tables as well.) We lived in the San Fernando Valley, so it might heave been there and not in L.A.

Does this ring a bell with anyone? I’d love to know where it was and see photos of this place, which holds some early memories for me.

Tourmaline Dec 26, 2015 6:37 PM

:previous:

I am without any personal knowledge of the meals-by-model-train theme restaurant in the SFValley but have little doubt that more than one existed. In fact, there are several in the midwest, including "Choo Choo Johnnys", etc. (I vaguely recall someone asking a similar question about a theme restaurant that may have existed in or near Long Beach in the early '60s.)
https://s3.amazonaws.com/saveonevery...675dccf00b.jpghttps://s3.amazonaws.com/saveonevery...675dccf00b.jpg
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pHMnC8dpKNA


While on the subject of restaurants, one source mentions "La Rue" or "La Rue's" as LA's first bona fide restaurant, circa 1852. http://www.saveur.com/article/Travel...ant-Milestones Have we seen any illustrations/photos/ephemera concerning this place that is reputed to have provided food that was "'poorly cooked but generally served.'"

tovangar2 Dec 26, 2015 7:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tourmaline (Post 7281069)
While on the subject of restaurants, one source mentions "La Rue" or "La Rue's" as LA's first bona fide restaurant, circa 1852. http://www.saveur.com/article/Travel...ant-Milestones Have we seen any illustrations/photos/ephemera concerning this place that is reputed to have provided food that was "'poorly cooked but generally served.'"


The most commonly held idea we kept seeing journalists talk about was the first restaurant in Los Angeles, and most of them said it was in 1852 at a restaurant called LaRue’s. Our research shows that is probably not true. The first stand alone restaurant—if not earlier—is the one I have record of in 1850 with a restaurant called the Old American. Probably the first restaurant that was not free-standing was the restaurant of the Bella Union Hotel, which opened in 1849. - library foundation of los angeles


Harris Newmark remembers in "Sixty Years in Southern California",

"Once fairly well settled here, I began to clerk for my brother, who in 1852 had bought out a merchant named Howard. For this service I received my lodging, the cost of my board, and thirty dollars each month. The charges for board at the Bella Union—then enjoying a certain prestige, through having been the official residence of Pio Pico when Stockton took the city—were too heavy, and arrangements were made with a Frenchman named John La Rue, who had a restaurant on the east side of Los Angeles Street, about two hundred feet south of Bell's Row. I paid him nine dollars a week for three more or less hearty meals a day, not including eggs, unless I provided them; in this case he agreed to prepare them for me. Eggs were by no means scarce; but steaks and mutton and pork chops were the popular choice, and potatoes and vegetables a customary accompaniment.

This La Rue, or Leroux, as he was sometimes called, was an interesting personality with an interesting history. Born in France, he sailed for the United States about the time of the discovery of gold in California, and made his way to San Francisco and the mines, where luck encouraged him to venture farther and migrate to Mazatlán, Mexico. While prospecting there, however, he was twice set upon and robbed; and barely escaping with his life, he once more turned northward, this time stopping at San Pedro and Los Angeles. Here, meeting Miss 28 Bridget Johnson, a native of Ireland, who had just come from New York by way of San Diego, La Rue married her, notwithstanding their inability to speak each other's language, and then opened a restaurant, which he continued to conduct until 1858 when he died, as the result of exposure at a fire on Main Street. Although La Rue was in no sense an eminent citizen, it is certain that he was esteemed and mourned. Prior to his death, he had bought thirty or thirty-five acres of land, on which he planted a vineyard and an orange-orchard; and these his wife inherited. In 1862, Madame La Rue married John Wilson, also a native of Ireland, who had come to Los Angeles during the year that the restaurateur died. He was a blacksmith and worked for John Goller, continuing in business for over twenty years, and adding greatly, by industry and wise management, to the dowry brought him by the thrifty widow.

I distinctly recall La Rue's restaurant, and quite as clearly do I remember one or two humorous experiences there. Nothing in Los Angeles, perhaps, has ever been cruder than this popular eating-place. The room, which faced the street, had a mud-floor and led to the kitchen through a narrow opening. Half a dozen cheap wooden tables, each provided with two chairs, stood against the walls. The tablecloths were generally dirty, and the knives and forks, as well as the furniture, were of the homeliest kind. The food made up in portions what it lacked in quality, and the diner rarely had occasion to leave the place hungry. What went most against my grain was the slovenliness of the proprietor himself. Flies were very thick in the summer months; and one day I found a big fellow splurging in my bowl of soup. This did not, however, faze John La Rue. Seeing the struggling insect, he calmly dipped his coffee-colored fingers into the hot liquid and, quite as serenely, drew out the fly; and although one could not then be as fastidious as nowadays, I nevertheless found it impossible to eat the soup.

On another occasion, however, mine host's equanimity was disturbed. I had given him two eggs one morning, to prepare for me, when Councilman A. Jacobi, a merchant and also a customer of La Rue's, came in for breakfast, bringing one 29 more egg than mine. Presently my meal, unusually generous, was served, and without loss of time I disposed of it and was about to leave; when just then Jacobi discovered that the small portion set before him could not possibly contain the three eggs he had supplied. Now, Jacobi was not only possessed of a considerable appetite, but had as well a definite unwillingness to accept less than his due, while La Rue, on the other hand, was very easily aroused to a high pitch of Gallic excitement; so that in less time than is required to relate the story, the two men were embroiled in a genuine Franco-Prussian dispute, all on account of poor La Rue's unintentional interchange of the two breakfasts. Soon after this encounter, Jacobi, who was an amateur violinist of no mean order, and had fiddled himself into the affections of his neighbors, left for Berlin with a snug fortune, and there after some years he died.

HossC Dec 26, 2015 11:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by austlar1 (Post 7280867)

Are you sure the Christmas tree pics were in Julius Shulman's house? Some of the other shots are probably from his home.

The descriptions with the Shulman pictures are usually brief, but generally accurate. There's no mention of any other locations, so I took it for granted that all the photos in the set were from the same place. The brick fireplace in one of the smaller images matches other pictures of the Shulman house, but I'll concede that it looks like one or more of the photos may have been taken elsewhere.

Unsurprisingly, Mr Shulman took many pictures of his own house, so I'll try and put together a selection of them in the near future.


----------------


The description for this Julius Shulman set says that this is the Richard Neutra designed Jardinette Apartments at 5128 West Marathon Street. It's "Job 780: Jardinette Apartments (Los Angeles, Calif.), 1950".

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...1.jpg~original

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...2.jpg~original

Both from Getty Research Institute

I can be pretty sure that the location in this description is correct, because the apartments are still standing. Maybe it's time for a repaint, as they look a lot smarter in the old GSV images.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...3.jpg~original
GSV

The first Shulman picture was taken from the side of these apartments at 5123 Marathon Street. According to redfin.com they were built in 1925. A bit of the Jardinette Apartments can be seen at the left.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...4.jpg~original
www.redfin.com

tovangar2 Dec 27, 2015 1:24 AM

Neutra's Jardinette
 
Thank you HossC.

There's a good history/critique of The Jardinette at LA Curbed

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-t...9%252520PM.jpg
andrea minton / ncmodernist


archInform has an excellent page with critical reaction to the building at the time it was built (1927):
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-F...9%252520PM.jpg
ncmodernist

Mstimc Dec 27, 2015 3:19 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tovangar2 (Post 7281206)
Thank you HossC.

T

archInform has an excellent page with critical reaction to the building at the time it was built (1927):

It's a free country but I've never been a big fan of mid-century modernism, nor its antecedent, Brutalism. As the photos show, they don't stand the test of time well and can easily look tacky and cheap unless perfectly maintained. I read the critical reviews, and the word I kept coming back to was "box". A box is a box no matter how many windows you stick on it. Sermon over. :rolleyes:


All times are GMT. The time now is 4:22 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.