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tovangar2 May 23, 2017 1:53 AM

Maryknoll info here

Los Angeles Mission Office
222 S. Hewitt, #6
Los Angeles, CA 90012
Phone: 213-747-9676
E-mail: losangeles@maryknoll.org

See also St Francis Xavier Chapel Japanese Center


The building is in the Arts District, a block and a bit away from Angel City Brewery.


Maybe the shrine is still there in the courtyard:
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/_S...Q=w687-h468-no
google maps

It's the same building as the historic photos (it's got that dentil detailing in the brickwork):
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/KA...A=w929-h596-no
gsv

The arched entry has been closed off with a gate and a door and the windows may have been changed out:
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/GI...A=w623-h515-no
gsv

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/rp...g=w677-h455-no
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/OL...w=w680-h329-no
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/4s...g=w677-h309-no
ladbs

PCAD has a page on Kieffer. He did many homes for the well-to-do.

Does anyone know what "Grantlock Brick" is?

ScottyB May 23, 2017 6:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tovangar2 (Post 7812243)
Maryknoll info here

Los Angeles Mission Office
222 S. Hewitt, #6
Los Angeles, CA 90012
Phone: 213-747-9676
E-mail: losangeles@maryknoll.org

See also St Francis Xavier Chapel Japanese Center


The building is in the Arts District, a block and a bit away from Angel City Brewery.


Maybe the shrine is still there in the courtyard:
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/_S...Q=w687-h468-no
google maps


Does anyone know what "Grantlock Brick" is?

Groutlock brick.
noun
1.
a brick chamfered on its inner angles to allow space for vertical and horizontal reinforcing rods sealed in grout.

I'm gonna wish my brick house was made with them when the next big one hits.

tovangar2 May 23, 2017 6:46 AM

:previous:

Thx!

tovangar2 May 23, 2017 7:26 AM

Where the State of California Building used to be
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Beaudry (Post 6602914)

.
For some reason the beloved State of California Building always makes me think of Thomas Ince:
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/QU...g=w525-h502-no
sony

I miss them both, and I even miss the State of California Buildings footprint:
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/Wc...w=w816-h617-no
google maps

Anyway, after seemingly endless design changes, the "new" park, really an annex connecting City Hall Park with Grand Park (called "First and Broadway Park"), will break ground next year and finish in 2020.

Downtown News
Mia Lehrer Associates



.

oldstuff May 23, 2017 3:08 PM

Regarding Mansheffer Drugs. I find a Charles H. Mansheffer, who was a druggist. He was born in New York in 1865. He graduated from Albany College of Pharmacy in 1890 and came to California before 1910 when he appears in the census as a druggist's clerk. He had married Mildred (Millie) ____ in New York in 1891. By 1920 he is listed in the census as the owner of a drugstore. A 1921 directory shows the store located at 6631 Hollywood Blvd., at the corner of Cahuenga. That same directory shows his home located at 1242 Gower. A Googlemobile search shows the house still there, although the front is covered by an iron fence, backed by large sheets of plywood so nothing can be seen. An aerial view shows an ordinary 1920's vintage frame house on a regular sized lot. Charles died in 1925 and is buried in Hollywood Forever Cemetery.

We had discussed Charles Mansheffer here in 2014 when it was noted that he had moved his pharmacy a block down the street (page 1246)

HossC May 23, 2017 6:45 PM

I think Julius Shulman's pictures of these small commercial buildings are among my favorites. This is "Job 234: Stiles Oliver Clements, Lockwood Shekelford [sic] Advertising Agency Offices, 1948".

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...1.jpg~original

The other shot just shows the entrance from a different angle.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...2.jpg~original

Both from Getty Research Institute

The Lockwood Shackelford Advertising Agency was at 2001 Beverly Boulevard. The April 2014 GSV image (below) shows the building still pretty much intact, but not being cared for. Some of the earlier GSV images even show graffiti on the front.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...3.jpg~original
GSV

Since then, the building has had a makeover, losing several original features (who approves these alterations to a Stiles Oliver Clements design?). The July 2014 GSV image at least shows the original entrance roof simply being covered by the new one. Also, a matching awning along the side has already been removed.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...4.jpg~original
GSV

tovangar2 May 23, 2017 7:00 PM

:previous:

Crikey, they're so proud of it too:
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/qG...A=w958-h595-no
2001beverly.com

Flyingwedge May 23, 2017 7:37 PM

Jevne home at NW corner of 9th and Burlington
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 7811636)
http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/102...923/siwSAi.jpg
https://www.flickr.com/photos/33756661@N07/

"Exterior front corner view of the Victorian Shingle style residence of wholesale grocer Hans Jevne at 849 South Burlington Avenue, on the northwest corner
of 9th Street and Burlington Avenue, Los Angeles, circa 1890. Three women are standing in the doorway. Samuel and Joseph Carter Newsom were the architects.
The house was finished in 1887 at a cost between $10,000 and $12,000."
-ozfan22


The October 10, 1886, LA Times had some detail on the Jevne home. The "They" at the start of the article are the Newsom brothers:

http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...c.jpg~original

ProQuest via LAPL

Tourmaline May 23, 2017 7:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HossC (Post 7812894)
I think Julius Shulman's pictures of these small commercial buildings are among my favorites.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...4.jpg~original
GSV

Too bad there aren't a few additional shots of the structure's general surroundings. From our perspective, it would be interesting to see the neighborhood as it was . . . rather than it is.:shrug: Bet when JS took those photos, parking may have been more readily available.;)

There is a Chevron station to the west of the :previous: structure. In front of the station is a curious "smart" street lamp. => https://www.google.com/maps/@34.0665...!6m1!1e1?hl=en


The lamp is said to to be a wireless operation and, of course, it is fitted with LEDs. http://applications.nam.lighting.phi...from-ericsson/

http://applications.nam.lighting.phi...Pole-img01.jpghttp://applications.nam.lighting.phi...Pole-img01.jpg


Although I am a convert to LED lighting, one wonders whether they are truly the panecea for all lighting ills and whether additional radio waves carry any potential ills. :shrug: http://www.livestrong.com/article/18...enon-lighting/ http://www.livestrong.com/article/18...enon-lighting/

Can't help but notice the similarity to a kitchen sink soap pump dispenser, so maybe the new lighting will keep the street well lit and clean.:P


http://img.auctiva.com/imgdata/1/0/1...2_o.jpg?nc=662

ethereal_reality May 23, 2017 7:59 PM

re: Maryknoll Mission

http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/102...924/7x2STl.jpg
library_congress

Quote:

Originally Posted by tovangar2 (Post 7812243)
The building is in the Arts District.

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/GI...A=w623-h515-no
gsv

Thanks for your help t2.

I also found this in the 1923 city directory.

http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/640...923/aYwoCF.jpg

This places is just north of the old Hollenbeck Home.

It's gone now, but the International Institute next door has survived (or could this be the old mission?) -but only if the street numbers were changed--

http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/102...922/fdXAu7.jpg
gsv

The International Institute was established in Boyle Heights in 1914 as a branch of the YWCA (Young Women’s Christian Association).
One of the Institute’s earliest projects was to meet “Japanese picture brides” at the LA Harbor and help them resettle into their new lives
in Los Angeles.

International Institute of Los Angeles
http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/102...923/Q6A0Cv.jpg
gsv

and in 1932
http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/102...922/WJXD30.jpg
https://www.laconservancy.org/locati...te-los-angeles

"The International Institute came to this site in the 1920s, but this building was completed in 1932. It is Spanish Colonial Revival in style,
with white stucco walls and a red tile roof. The building features two courtyards, one at the front behind the wall along Boyle Avenue,
and one just inside the doors."


The architects of this building were Webber & Spaulding, one of the most prominent architecture firms in Los Angeles in the 1920s.

__

Philip Mershon May 23, 2017 8:25 PM

https://www.google.com/maps/d/viewer...942327887&z=16

Hey folks, I'm doing some research on the area that is known today as the Media District in Hollywood (boundaries indicated in the google map). I have a bunch of addresses that I know the history of and several more that I want to research further. But, in an effort to leave no stone unturned, I thought I'd come to you guys. Do you have a short list of addresses in that area that you think I shouldn't miss and a couple words on why it's important in your view? I'm, of course, looking for entertainment industry connection but also general community interest, lgbt interest, govt buildings, pretty much the gamut. :help:

tovangar2 May 23, 2017 9:15 PM

Curlicues
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Tourmaline (Post 7812993)
There is a Chevron station to the west of the structure. In front of the station is a curious "smart" street lamp.
The lamp is said to to be a wireless operation and, of course, it is fitted with LEDs. http://applications.nam.lighting.phi...from-ericsson/

What an odd, ungainly-looking electrolier. I don't have enough knowledge to understand why the pole must be so swollen:
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/Xw...Q=w421-h635-no
phillips

I had to laugh though at the vestigial nod to our historic streetlamps. A distant, but embedded memory, which makes little sense in this application, like molded "stitching" on plastic luggage handles.:
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/UL...w=w324-h500-no
(detail)

.................................................................

Thank you for the other Maryknoll location e_r. Always nice to see a Webber and Spaulding on the thread.

HossC May 23, 2017 9:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HossC (Post 7812894)

I think Julius Shulman's pictures of these small commercial buildings are among my favorites. This is "Job 234: Stiles Oliver Clements, Lockwood Shekelford [sic] Advertising Agency Offices, 1948".

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...1.jpg~original

Getty Research Institute

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tourmaline (Post 7812993)

Too bad there aren't a few additional shots of the structure's general surroundings. From our perspective, it would be interesting to see the neighborhood as it was . . . rather than it is.:shrug: Bet when JS took those photos, parking may have been more readily available.;)

I can show you an aerial view of the area from the same year as the Shulman photo. I've arrowed 2001 Beverly Boulevard in the center.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...Boulevard1.jpg
Historic Aerials

HossC May 23, 2017 10:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tovangar2 (Post 7812384)

Anyway, after seemingly endless design changes, the "new" park, really an annex connecting City Hall Park with Grand Park (called "First and Broadway Park"), will break ground next year and finish in 2020.

Downtown News
Mia Lehrer Associates

That's not the only park that's visualized on the second site. Here's their vision for the Piggyback Yard.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...1.jpg~original
Mia Lehrer + Associates

There's also this makeover for the area around Union Station, which seems to include the removal of the Mozaic Apartments. The possibility of a quick teardown was mentioned in the comments of this la.curbed article about Geoff Palmer back in November 2014.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...2.jpg~original
Mia Lehrer + Associates

tovangar2 May 23, 2017 10:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Philip Mershon (Post 7813023)
https://www.google.com/maps/d/viewer...942327887&z=16

Hey folks, I'm doing some research on the area that is known today as the Media District in Hollywood (boundaries indicated in the google map). I have a bunch of addresses that I know the history of and several more that I want to research further. But, in an effort to leave no stone unturned, I thought I'd come to you guys. Do you have a short list of addresses in that area that you think I shouldn't miss and a couple words on why it's important in your view? I'm, of course, looking for entertainment industry connection but also general community interest, lgbt interest, govt buildings, pretty much the gamut. :help:

There's some info at these links:

Norish Los Angeles:

http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...ostcount=32129

http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...ostcount=32133

http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...ostcount=32137

http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...ostcount=32138

http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...ostcount=32140

http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...ostcount=32142

http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...ostcount=32195

http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...ostcount=32205

Silent Locations:
(John Bengtson has much knowledge about the area. His email is at the site)

https://silentlocations.wordpress.co...in-and-keaton/

https://silentlocations.wordpress.co...nd-convict-13/

https://silentlocations.wordpress.co...close-to-home/

https://silentlocations.wordpress.co...-school-fence/

https://silentlocations.wordpress.co...ales-it-tells/

https://silentlocations.wordpress.co...-neighborhood/

Marilyn Monroe attended the Vine Street School when she was at the Los Angeles Orphanage/Hollygrove across the street, 1935-37.

Look into the Cahuenga Valley Lemon Exchange, which was at the SE corner of Santa Monica and Cole. It was very important to the history of this area. Hollywood owes much to the lemon (which fared better than oranges in the area).

You might want to search "Colegrove" too.

tovangar2 May 23, 2017 11:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HossC (Post 7813121)
There's also this makeover for the area around Union Station, which seems to include the removal of the Mozaic Apartments. The possibility of a quick teardown was mentioned in the comments of this la.curbed article about Geoff Palmer back in November 2014.

I will be glad to see the back of the Mosaic. I hope it happens. Housing is one of our three big problems, but surely we can do better than that.

It's too bad the scale of Union Station has been interfered with by surrounding development. Also, that three-story (at #1 below) totally blocks one's view of the station when arriving from the south. I wish it had never been built:
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/q0...=w1003-h582-no
gsv

Are they really going to bury the freeway (#2)? Three cheers if they are.

And does this mean we can rebuild Lugo House (#3)? I'm not usually a fan of recreations, but I'd be down with that. Anyone else have an opinion?:
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/v_...w=w696-h411-no
mla (annotated detail)

A 1950 proposal, which coincidentally features the "original plaza":
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/Mi...w=w718-h518-no
flickr and JScott

BifRayRock May 24, 2017 1:35 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HossC (Post 7813099)
I can show you an aerial view of the area from the same year as the Shulman photo. I've arrowed 2001 Beverly Boulevard in the center.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...Boulevard1.jpg
Historic Aerials







Interesting neighborhood that deserves further attention.

A few doors north on Westlake Avenue, 202, is a 1925-home which cries out for a "piano moving sequence." Fortunately, the rear access appears to be a simple matter, unless the alley is blocked.:yes: Sitting so high, one hopes it has an enormous basement. I am glad this old gal is still around. Too bad there aren't more survivors like her.

Front
http://i357.photobucket.com/albums/o...c.jpg~originalGoogleSVU


Back
http://i357.photobucket.com/albums/o...9.jpg~originalgoogleSVU



tovangar2 May 24, 2017 5:17 AM

202 N Westlake
 
:previous:

I was looking at that one too BRR. There's often untouched blocks, or isolated gems, behind our jumbled commercial streets.

Zillow offers this info FWIW:

"Great family home built in Hollywood in 1910 and moved to its present location in 1920. This 5/2 Craftsman in Echo Park/Hi-Fi area retains many original features and is just awaiting your restoration imagination. During the Jazz Age, it is said that Count Basie, Josephine Baker and other illuminaries in the arts movement were regular guests of the original owners. Although the walls cannot talk, they do boast incredible wainscotting with high plate rails, beautiful leaded glass built-ins in the formal dining room and library, immense stone gas fireplace, as well as window seats and built in bureaus in the bedroom closets. Additional original features include stairwell ball finial, original wood floors, coffered ceilings and pocket doors, some light fixtures and heating registers. Plumbing and electrical are all updated and in good working condition. Nice sized kitchen and master bath are ready for you to re-design to your liking. Large basement bonus room perfect for art or music studio offers plenty of additional storage. Rapidly developing neighborhood with great investment potential. Walk to Echo Park, Lassens, shops and restaurants. High on a hill, this house has wonderful views of Los Angeles and Hollywood, breathtaking sunset views from the spacious front porch and 2nd story balconies! Lofty attic can be finished into a third floor living space."

One of the few times I've heard of a house moving east, but the owner lived across the street, then at No. 203, so I'm sure he had his reasons.

Last sold in 2002 for $275K per Redfin.

New foundations were put in in 1925, so that's more likely the move year.

Interior pix at the link

The house next-door to the right was built in 1907 (per permits, Redfin says 1910). And the one next door to that in 1906. Both have been stuccoed.
There's others of that era on the block and surrounding streets.

They say Echo Park. I'd call it Crown Hills.




ETA:

Huh. The same owner, Thomas Thurman, also moved 217 N Westlake to this block from 1610 N Normandie in 1929
to get it out of the way of a handsome Paul Kingsbury apartment building.

....and a different owner moved 129 N Westlake from 450 E 4th St in 1925. It replaced a 1913 church.

Another was moved from Sunbury, out of the way of the Harbor, in '51.


This is a very strange block.

ethereal_reality May 24, 2017 5:53 AM

I don't believe we have seen this photo on NLA.

"California Lingerie Manufacturing Co., Los Angeles California 1931."

http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/128...922/C5CgdU.jpg
www.vintage2068.rssing.com




I found this address in the 1930 directory.

http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/320...924/AXx3gi.jpg
lapl

Do you think this address is the manufacturing or a sales office (Room 302)? -or perhaps both.




I'm not sure how much the Garment District boundaries have evolved since in the 1930s.

Garment / Fashion District (present day?)

http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/640...923/CVsyRC.jpg
http://bridallovely.com/room-design-...-district-map/

note that 'Silks' (light purple) have their own little area.



_


for search purposes:
California Lingerie Co. 347 S. Spring R 302

Flyingwedge May 24, 2017 6:06 AM

Wills home at 501 Buena Vista on Fort Moore Hill
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by MichaelRyerson (Post 7811998)

https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8247/8...594a0cdb_o.jpgUnion Station Construction Begins 1934


(1934) - A steam shovel hissed on April 19, 1934, and bit into Fort Moore Hill at Spring Street and Sunset Boulevard (actually the steam shovels, there are two, are over on Justicia Street and N. Broadway where it exits the tunnel) as a part of ground breaking exercises for the start of work on the new $8,000,000 Union depot for Los Angeles. The photo shows the ceremony in progress, the speakers' stand (with horizontal stripes) between two steam shovels which turned the first shovels-full of earth. In the background is Fort Moore Hill with the (Mary) Banning House at the right and 'the home of Dr. Lemoyne Wills on the upper left--- crammed with treasured antiques from China, razed a few years after this photo was taken. (thanks rick m). The intersection of Spring Street and Sunset Boulevard is in the right foreground. Dirt amounting to 50,000 cubic yards will be moved to fill in at the new depot site.

LAPL

I checked back through the thread, and I couldn't find that we've looked closely at what is generally referred to as the
home of Dr. William LeMoyne Wills (1853-1933):

http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...u.png~original

SCWHR-P-050-9656 at Seaver Center

The home was located at the NE corner of Broadway and Fort Moore Place (formerly Fort Street and Rock Street), but
its address was always on Buena Vista. The 1910 Baist Map shows the home (with the red dot) at 501 Buena Vista, its
address since 1891. On the SE corner of Broadway and Fort Moore Place is the Milo Baker home (with a 6 on it):

http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...h.jpg~original

Historic Mapworks


In this c. 1900 photo looking south, the Wills home is on the right, and the Baker home is in the middle, with the dome:

http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...u.jpg~original

00061421 at LAPL


This c. 1898 (or perhaps earlier?) shot looks north across Fort Moore Place at the Wills home, with the Baker home
behind the photographer and Sonora Town in the distance:

http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...r.jpg~original

00055093 at LAPL


The home was built not by W. L. Wills but by his father, John Alexander Wills (1819-1891). The elder Wills -- if you haven't read the
bio at the link -- originated the phrase, "those twin relics of barbarism -- polygamy and slavery." The Willses -- William, John, and
John's wife, Charlotte LeMoyne Wills (1824-1908) helped establish the Cremation Society of Southern California and the first crematory
in Los Angeles (and possibly just the second one in the United States), at Rosedale Cemetery in 1887. The Wills family papers are at
the Huntington Library.

BTW, the first cremation in Los Angeles was on June 16, 1887. The first body cremated was that of a woman who had died six months
previously; her remains were disinterred to break in the furnace.

Charlotte Wills is also important because she was a close friend of Caroline Severance, who tells us that the Wills home was designed
by Mary Alston Channing Saunders, then-wife of Charles Willard Saunders.

In the fall of 1886 the Willses moved into their new Fort Hill home at 101 Buena Vista (it was later renumbered 501):

http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...ps9vrer1rl.jpg

September 28, 1886, Los Angeles Times at ProQuest via LAPL


The 1887-88 Smith & McPhee Los Angeles Directory is the first to show the Wills family on Fort Hill (William LeMoyne
[Wills, not Willis] might be listed twice; the family had been at 209 S. Hill prior to moving to Buena Vista Street):

http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...psspbxnlzc.jpg

ProQuest at LAPL


After John Wills died . . .

http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...psn6mywo3j.jpg

November 30, 1891, Los Angeles Herald @ CDNC


. . . apparently there was some discord in the Wills home that eventually turned into a lawsuit that went to the
California Supreme Court in 1913 (below, the son is William LeMoyne, the mother is Charlotte, and the daughter
is Madeline Frances or "Fanny"):

http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...psmfshh7sn.jpg

Casetext.com also The Pacific Reporter @ GoogleBooks


What I gather from reading the above document is that after John Wills died, ownership of the home on Fort Hill
passed to his widow, Charlotte. In 1895 she put the house in a trust, with William and Fanny "in equal undivided
ownership and interest," but with Fanny as trustee. In 1903 the trust was dissolved and ownership of the home
reverted to Charlotte, who then conveyed the home to Fanny "absolutely and in fee simple." So although 501 Buena
Vista is often called the home of Dr. William L. Wills, he was only half-owner for eight years, through a trust.

Anyway, Fanny lived on in the house until about the end of 1930. This photo is dated c. 1900, but I think it's a lot
closer to 1930. I also believe this side of the house faces Fort Moore Place:

http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...pswiulyubz.jpg

00017225 at LAPL


Fanny didn't want to move:

http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...m.jpg~original
http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...4.jpg~original
http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...4.jpg~original

March 23, 1930, Los Angeles Times @ ProQuest via LAPL


December 11, 1930, Los Angeles Times:

http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...o.jpg~original
http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...l.jpg~original
http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...q.jpg~original

ProQuest via LAPL


This photo, taken December 25, 1930, might show the old adobe wall "crumbling back into the earth" that's
mentioned in the above article:

http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...ps2wtuaojk.jpg

00026473 at LAPL ("Crumbling adobe structure in the backyard of the Wills home, located at 501 N. Buena Vista")


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