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Bailey Oct 25, 2019 8:59 PM

Texas Triangle
 
To continue the theme of the other posts, for the non Texans- let me paint a picture of what is happening in the state.

Today, as of 2019, FIVE of the THIRTEEN most populated cities in the United States of America, the #1 economic superpower in the world, are located in Texas.

Not only are they located in Texas, they are located inside what is called the 'Texas Triangle'.

Those cities, of course, are:

Houston - 4
San Antonio- 7
Dallas- 9
Austin- 11
Ft. Worth- 13

Within that Texas Triangle, you will find TWO of the FIVE largest Metropolitan Areas in the United States. Those two, of course, are the Metroplex (Dallas + Ft. Worth) at #4 and the single city seat Metro of Houston at #5.

All of the projections that I hear, for the population of Texas in the year 2050, have Texas around the 50-55 million projection. The majority (90%+), will be located within the Texas Triangle.

What does that mean for the Texas cities....we shall see how it develops but, living in Houston, I can say the Inner loop & Uptown is going vertical at an alarming rate, and mass transit is increasing in Houston. I imagine the same is happening Dallas.

Austin, is going through an obvious growth spurt and surprisingly, I haven't seen the same happen to San Antonio but....IT WILL. It is a huge rising stock!

So, instead of thinking about the Houston and Metroplex passing the 3 in front of them, think about what WILL happen to the Texas Triangle.

Obadno Oct 25, 2019 9:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bailey (Post 8729545)
To continue the theme of the other posts, for the non Texans- let me paint a picture of what is happening in the state.

Today, as of 2019, FIVE of the THIRTEEN most populated cities in the United States of America, the #1 economic superpower in the world, are located in Texas.

Not only are they located in Texas, they are located inside what is called the 'Texas Triangle'.

Those cities, of course, are:

Houston - 4
San Antonio- 7
Dallas- 9
Austin- 11
Ft. Worth- 13

Within that Texas Triangle, you will find TWO of the FIVE largest Metropolitan Areas in the United States. Those two, of course, are the Metroplex (Dallas + Ft. Worth) at #4 and the single city seat Metro of Houston at #5.

All of the projections that I hear, for the population of Texas in the year 2050, have Texas around the 50-55 million projection. The majority (90%+), will be located within the Texas Triangle.

What does that mean for the Texas cities....we shall see how it develops but, living in Houston, I can say the Inner loop & Uptown is going vertical at an alarming rate, and mass transit is increasing in Houston. I imagine the same is happening Dallas.

Austin, is going through an obvious growth spurt and surprisingly, I haven't seen the same happen to San Antonio but....IT WILL. It is a huge rising stock!

So, instead of thinking about the Houston at Metroplex passing the 3 in front of them, think about what WILL happen to the Texas Triangle.

... it will get denser?

pj3000 Oct 25, 2019 9:21 PM

Texas will turn Blue.

Bailey Oct 25, 2019 9:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Obadno (Post 8729555)
... it will get denser?

I'm thinking Houston and Dallas will add millions and continue their rampage to becoming mega American Alpha cities. They will go vertical and urban in a way that will please most on this site.

Austin will still grow, but will take a step back to address the infrastructure problems associated with rapid growth.

San Antonio is the wild card....look for this city to boom..really boom..a la Austin. A booming San Antonio metro will just morph into a bigger Austin metro.

As for the rest, I expect to see much of the rest of the Texas Triangle to start to fill it at lesser density levels, but hopefully in a way to prevent the issues associated with sprawl.

Either way, the Triangle will continue to become one of the most important regions of the United States. It's even more apparent if you consider Houston's "influence" along the Gulf Coast and beyond.

Texas just isn't slowing down anytime soon.

suburbanite Oct 25, 2019 9:32 PM

I was in Texas for the first time this year and it was hotter than I ever imagined. I fear for the well-being of 50 million people living there during whatever a heat wave looks like in 2050.

jd3189 Oct 25, 2019 9:45 PM

This is interesting. A regional rail should be constructed ( if not already there) to connect all these cities to one another. Also something should be built to connect the Triangle to other cities that could benefit outside like El Paso, Amarillo, and Corpus Cristi.

Bailey Oct 25, 2019 9:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by suburbanite (Post 8729587)
I was in Texas for the first time this year and it was hotter than I ever imagined. I fear for the well-being of 50 million people living there during whatever a heat wave looks like in 2050.


True, it does get hot...but the heat here is less of an issue than the extreme cold in most places. We've learned to live around the heat...its the outsiders who aren't used to it.

dimondpark Oct 25, 2019 11:33 PM

Population growth rates are slowing everywhere in the US, including Texas.

This article in the Hill goes into detail...
https://thehill.com/homenews/state-w...sity-in-coming

JAYNYC Oct 25, 2019 11:36 PM

One of the largest implications I see is that more effort should have been focused on building a major regional airport between Austin and San Antonio. There was talk around this, but Austin was eventually "gifted" Bergstrom AFB back in '91, paving the way for AUS (Austin Bergstrom International) and the rest is history.

Today, AUS is a first-class international airport, one that suits a thriving, rapidly growing city like Austin. Meanwhile, SAT (San Antonio International) recently expanded, and though the airport is growing and being renovated, it "feels" (and looks) like it belongs in a medium-sized city like Birmingham or Norfolk.

As the two cities experience continue to attract new residents and businesses, and as their suburbs push closer and closer towards each other, the metros will essentially connect, and a regional transportation center along the lines of DFW could serve as a foundation for greater economic prosperity across the region.

TexasPlaya Oct 25, 2019 11:46 PM

The border region has also boomed until recently, there are several million people there depending on what you count.

urban_encounter Oct 25, 2019 11:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JAYNYC (Post 8729717)
Meanwhile, SAT (San Antonio International) recently expanded, and though the airport is growing and being renovated, it "feels" (and looks) like it belongs in a medium-sized city like Birmingham or Norfolk. .

San Antonio’s airport feels and looks like a medium sized city because it is a medium sized city (or rather a mid sized market). I say that as somebody who lived and attended school there and loves San Antonio. But Airport authorities usually do not build facilities that the market can’t support because air carriers help bear the costs of airport construction. SAT has done a good job keeping up with growth without overreaching. In the end keeping costs under control will be much more attractive to lure future air service to other cities and grow passenger traffic.

bossabreezes Oct 26, 2019 12:05 AM

I was literally just thinking about this today.

I think Waco has some future potential to boom as well, as it's the midway point from Dallas to Austin.

Texas is impressive for it's giant metros. They have not developed in any kind of sustainable way (and in most cases are still not righting this wrong), but nonetheless, still impressive.

I have a feeling Dallas will continue it's roaring growth. I think Austin is going to stall, mainly due to it's insane price point for an inland, non coastal city. It's very expensive, and while the city has a strong job market, I don't see this pricetag as being sustainable long term. Either the metro will stop growing or the suburbs will sprawl very far out from the city to meet demand for lower cost housing.

TexasPlaya Oct 26, 2019 12:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bossabreezes (Post 8729737)
I was literally just thinking about this today.

I think Waco has some future potential to boom as well, as it's the midway point from Dallas to Austin.

There are a handful of mid tier cities that are growing handsomely due to a large university, the military, or recreation like Waco, San Marcos, Conroe, New Braunfels, College Station, Temple, and Canyon Lake. They are also well connected to the big 4 metros.

Bailey Oct 26, 2019 1:44 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jd3189 (Post 8729607)
This is interesting. A regional rail should be constructed ( if not already there) to connect all these cities to one another. Also something should be built to connect the Triangle to other cities that could benefit outside like El Paso, Amarillo, and Corpus Cristi.

A privately funded bullet train is currently being planned. It will connect Houston and Dallas.

Dariusb Oct 26, 2019 2:42 AM

I wouldn't be surprised if the cities along the Interstate 35corridor(D/FW, Waco, Killen/Temple, Austin, San Antonio) all grow into each other or very close to doing so by 2050. I also think that the Texas Triangle will attract not just people out of state like it has been but other slower growing parts of the state will probably lose population to the Triangle.

BG918 Oct 26, 2019 2:51 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dariusb (Post 8729845)
I wouldn't be surprised if the cities along the Interstate 35corridor(D/FW, Waco, Killen/Temple, Austin, San Antonio) all grow into each other or very close to doing so by 2050. I also think that the Texas Triangle will attract not just people out of state like it has been but other slower growing parts of the state will probably lose population to the Triangle.

It will be interesting to see what type of spillover growth occurs further north into Oklahoma along the 35/75 corridors.

http://www.america2050.org/images/Texas_Triangle.png

AviationGuy Oct 26, 2019 2:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by suburbanite (Post 8729587)
I was in Texas for the first time this year and it was hotter than I ever imagined. I fear for the well-being of 50 million people living there during whatever a heat wave looks like in 2050.

Yep, it's hot (and getting hotter) from June-September, and in some years you can add May and October. This October has been horrendously hot, although it's fairly cold for now and northwest TX had about 6 inches of snow yesterday.

People complain about the hot summers, but about half the year (and sometimes more) is mild to cool, and cold at times. But generally very pleasant except for some extended rainy periods. Don't forget, too, that northwest and west TX can have blizzards, although usually short lived and followed by nice weather.

JManc Oct 26, 2019 3:07 AM

I said this in another thread but the explosive boom of the past is largely in the past for Texas. We are ageing and birthrates are declining across the board. We are still growing at a steady pace but the growth is stabilizing and the population is maturing; Houston for example is less and less of a transient city. People come here with intent of staying, not merely passing through. And the rest of the country is healthier economically to offer transplants more options. Houston at 7 million is more than enough but I'm sure we will hit 10 million (ugh) at some point but it will take longer to get there...

Dariusb Oct 26, 2019 5:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BG918 (Post 8729849)
It will be interesting to see what type of spillover growth occurs further north into Oklahoma along the 35/75 corridors.

http://www.america2050.org/images/Texas_Triangle.png

Very interesting.. Since Dallas's suburbs are growing north along Central Expressway (75) towards Oklahoma and parts of 75 are being upgraded to interstate standards, I wonder will that corridor one day become part of the interstate system?

ThePhun1 Oct 26, 2019 5:51 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by urban_encounter (Post 8729730)
San Antonio’s airport feels and looks like a medium sized city because it is a medium sized city (or rather a mid sized market). I say that as somebody who lived and attended school there and loves San Antonio. But Airport authorities usually do not build facilities that the market can’t support because air carriers help bear the costs of airport construction. SAT has done a good job keeping up with growth without overreaching. In the end keeping costs under control will be much more attractive to lure future air service to other cities and grow passenger traffic.

San Antonio has a bigger population but Austin has more movers and shakers (government or otherwise) and a richer, more educated workforce per capita. That essentially makes them equals.


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